Is N+ 2009 beyond a beginner's cert now?

LTParisLTParis Member Posts: 43 ■■□□□□□□□□
I am going over the various ways to get the certifications that I desire. Right now I am planing to go MCTP (Vista) > MCSA > MCSE > MCITP:EA. Because I already have my A+ I can still choose a CompTIA S+ or N+ certification to fullfil one test requirement.

I have read through a number of sources that N+ is simply a beginner's certification, like the A+ and is not worth the time or investment if you are experienced (I have 8 years of Sys Admin plus an additional 5 years of help desk and web dev). I have read some comments that the N+ 2009 exam seems to have shed some of it's outdated material, and I am wondering if it may carry some more weight in my certification push.

I know right now I am not ready for the CCENT or CCNA. I am way too rusty (10 years of certification hibernation).

Professionally I don't think I have hurt from the lack of modern certifications. I have always done well obtaining jobs when needed, but at a minimum this will satisfy some personal desire to quantify my experience, however many years I have under my belt already.

So N+ 2009 too basic for the seasoned IT person? Should I just focus on a standard MS elective test and go for something like MCSA + Messaging instead?

Comments

  • qwertyiopqwertyiop Member Posts: 725 ■■■□□□□□□□
    If i were you I would just go for it. If not the certification atleast the material.
  • TXOgreTXOgre Member Posts: 27 ■□□□□□□□□□
    LTParis wrote: »
    I am going over the various ways to get the certifications that I desire. Right now I am planing to go MCTP (Vista) > MCSA > MCSE > MCITP:EA. Because I already have my A+ I can still choose a CompTIA S+ or N+ certification to fullfil one test requirement.

    I have read through a number of sources that N+ is simply a beginner's certification, like the A+ and is not worth the time or investment if you are experienced (I have 8 years of Sys Admin plus an additional 5 years of help desk and web dev). I have read some comments that the N+ 2009 exam seems to have shed some of it's outdated material, and I am wondering if it may carry some more weight in my certification push.

    I know right now I am not ready for the CCENT or CCNA. I am way too rusty (10 years of certification hibernation).

    Professionally I don't think I have hurt from the lack of modern certifications. I have always done well obtaining jobs when needed, but at a minimum this will satisfy some personal desire to quantify my experience, however many years I have under my belt already.

    So N+ 2009 too basic for the seasoned IT person? Should I just focus on a standard MS elective test and go for something like MCSA + Messaging instead?

    With your experience, you should be able to walk into that test and pass it without any studying at all. It's pretty easy for someone with experience. I have about the same amount of experience as you do, so I did a quick review of the topics and scheduled my test right away. I passed without an issue and no in-depth studying or review.

    I'm not paying for my certifications, and I'm not sure if I would have paid for the Net+ knowing what I know now. The money might be better spent on a Sec+ if you're doing an MCSE...unless you're just looking for more letters to put on your resume ;)
    A+ Net+ Sec+ MCSE
  • LTParisLTParis Member Posts: 43 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Like you my company will reimburse me for my exams so cost isn't an issue right now. I could probably walk in and pass, but I want to make sure that I am ready for the gotchas like some of the oddball connectors and I really want to get the OSI model down pat (always had a problem flipping a few protocols on the layers). I've downloaded the study guide from here and that will probably give me a good refresher into everything.

    When I get back into a comfortable groove with testing I will probably study up for the S+ as well.

    I know there is a NDA on N+ 2009 right now. Is there any intersting advice that one can give for this new test? Anything that is getting more coverage (like IPv6) that those wanting to take '09 should look at?
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Alligator wrestler Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    LTParis wrote: »
    ....

    I know there is a NDA on N+ 2009 right now.


    icon_rolleyes.gif

    What do you mean, now? There has been a NDA on certification exams since..their inception (for CompTIA) and probably MS too.
    Is there any intersting advice that one can give for this new test? Anything that is getting more coverage (like IPv6) that those wanting to take '09 should look at?

    Read the objectives. If it is listed, it is fair game to ask the question about the topic.
    Plantwiz
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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    The CCENT is mostly networking theory with a relatively small amount of Cisco-centric material and IOS configuration. I'd go after that if I were you; I don't think the Network+ is any less of an entry-level cert than it always has been. Even if it did change dramatically, HR would never know icon_lol.gif

    My vote is for CCENT. If I can do it, so can you!
  • TravR1TravR1 Member Posts: 332
    Ccent! :d
    Austin Community College, certificate of completion: C++ Programming.
    Sophomore - Computer Science, Mathematics
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Member Posts: 2,077 ■■■■■■□□□□
    As you progress in your MCSA you are going to find a lot of networking concepts that the CCNA covers very strongly. I dont think I could have passed my 70-291 withouth my CCNA background first.

    You could consider mixing up your path a bit, but they just adds extra time until you can add the all important CCNA and MCSA entries to your resume.
    70-620 >> CCENT >> 70-270 >> 70-290 >> CCNA >> 70-291
    -Daniel
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    The simple answer: no, Network+ is not an advanced cert. However, judging by your statements, it seems like you're judging the difficulty-levels of these exams by what you've heard about them and not by the actual material and content of the tests, themselves. Someone who has spent four or five years building and repairing PCs might find the A+ very easy, but a sysadmin who really only works within the OS and/or on networking equipment would have a harder time with it, just as a newbie would. As for the Network+, they upgrade the objectives every few years, so don't think that the difficulty increases or decreases just because they announce an update.

    My suggestion, go to a bookstore and check out the books for some of these exams. Compare CCENT next to Network+, see how they stack up with your interests and goals. Honestly, if you're not ready for CCENT , you're not ready for Network+ either, the difficulty-levels are comparable. I'd also check and see what's in demand in your area, do a quick search on some job-boards and see what employers are asking for, that should give you an idea of where you should be going. Another, if not the most, important factor is your area of interest. It sounds like you've been doing mostly sysadmin work, not necessarily network engineering, system building, etc. If you want to continue with that, then look into Microsoft and Linux certs, they'll be more inline with what you've been doing.

    The Cisco certs are quite useful, but they're a whole different world than the MS certs and you make it sound like you're trying to figure out what a good "first mid-to-pro level" cert would be. The MCSA is a good choice, especially if you're continuing on to the MCSE after. (And, of course, the MCITP is an obvious goal if you intend to move towards Windows Server 2008 in the future.) Keep in mind, though, the A+/Network+ combination as an elective only works for the MCSA, not necessarily for the MCSE. You'll want to look into the Security+ certification if you want to have an elective for both.

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  • sirgoolsirgool Member Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Very useful information. Nicely put. Thanks..

    I'm a newbie here working on N+.
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