Mathematics involvement in computer science.

I am interested in pursuing a Bsc computer science degree. I know that Mathematics has a lot to do with the computer science discipline and in order for me to take some computer science courses i need prerequisites mathematics papers finished. The thing is I am below average in mathematics and I am not that really good at maths. I have I.T certifications and I love computing a lot it is my passion. My question is because of this could i really struggle in the computer science degree programme ?

Give me your thoughts on the involvement of mathematics and computer science.

Comments

  • RiskblingRiskbling Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I am interested in pursuing a Bsc computer science degree. I know that Mathematics has a lot to do with the computer science discipline and in order for me to take some computer science courses i need prerequisites mathematics papers finished. The thing is I am below average in mathematics and I am not that really good at maths. I have I.T certifications and I love computing a lot it is my passion. My question is because of this could i really struggle in the computer science degree programme ?

    Give me your thoughts on the involvement of mathematics and computer science.

    Yes, if you are not very good at mathematics you are going to struggle. However, that does not meet you will not be able to accomplish a Computer Science degree. You will just have to put your mind to it.

    Calc I, II, III
    Discrete Mathematics
    Linear Algebra
    Differential Equations

    Are the typical math class Computer Science grads will take.
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    As stated above math is a big portion of CS...if this is for a Bachelors though you can take the courses in the program.
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Alligator wrestler Mod Posts: 5,057 Mod
    ... The thing is I am below average in mathematics and I am not that really good at math...

    First, if I were you, I'd work on how I described my math ability.

    Second, since you believe this is a struggle, work on ways to make it less of a struggle. Perhaps hire a tutor or repeat some classes (check with the professors or your university if they offer courses with a mere pass/fail or if you can sit in for no-credit if there is space).

    If you really desire to pursue this track, and Math is a struggle, then find a way to make it not as much of a struggle. You may improve by just having more practice or different perspectives and hearing/doing it a few times.

    On the other hand, if after more attempts to become more proficient and it still doesn't make sense for you, maybe look for another way to be involved in the field, but one that doesn't require you doing the math as much.

    Your advisor should be better able to help recommend ways for you to succeed.
    Plantwiz
    _____
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    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSOM GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,671 Admin
    Many universities have a CIS (Computer Information Systems) program that replaces higher math with business classes other, less theoretical and more practical learning. Check into it.
  • shednikshednik Member Posts: 2,005
    JDMurray wrote: »
    Many universities have a CIS (Computer Information Systems) program that replaces higher math with business classes other, less theoretical and more practical learning. Check into it.

    That is another option to look into but I would first decide what your career goals are...I have my undergrad in a program similar to what JD is talking about. If I would have known I would later decide I want to stay close to the academic/research side of things later in my career I think a degree in CS may have been better for me in the long run. I'm lacking a bit in the math section for my masters and having to do alot of supplemental research and learning since most of my fellow students were CE/CS/EE undergrads and they had plenty of math to cover the material. So keep that in mind if you look into the CIS program...it's not a bad program choice but just gauge what you goals are down the line.
  • skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    My CS bachelors program only requires up to precalculus, and some other math classes if you go for certain non required topics/classes. We're also required to either take discrete mathematics from the math department, or discrete structures within the CS department. My program is obviously not all that math intensive.

    The only area where higher math comes in is the grad program, where you need Calc III for one class & statistics for another class...but only one of those classes is required and only for the MIS concentration - the straight computer science masters track doesn't require any more math.

    So the math intensity level will vary from program to program. Don't let math scare you or psyche you out or keep you from going for a CS degree if that's what you want. You can DO it!
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  • ipconfig.allipconfig.all Banned Posts: 428
    Thank you all for your advice !!! yeah computers is my passion and I will do it !!! One more question is the computer science stressful? I know some people who does engineering and medicinal they get a lot of work and some drop out of it. I want to know will the computer science programme be stressful and will it be a challenge to graduate?

    Please share your experience.
  • SepiraphSepiraph Member Posts: 179 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Well IMO practical programming doesn't really require that much mathematics at all unless you were doing numerical analysis. Most control structure does require the use of Boolean logic but that's pretty basic math, and of course it requires one to think logically about solving a programming problem so it is quite akin to doing mathematics.

    Theoretical computer sciences (e.g. Theory of computing, Computational Complexity theory, Quantum computing) are the areas that require all the heavy mathematics.

    Anyway it'd be best to check the course requirement at your University, some may even allow you to design your own course!
  • KaminskyKaminsky Member Posts: 1,235
    I am interested in pursuing a Bsc computer science degree. I know that Mathematics has a lot to do with the computer science discipline and in order for me to take some computer science courses i need prerequisites mathematics papers finished. The thing is I am below average in mathematics and I am not that really good at maths. I have I.T certifications and I love computing a lot it is my passion. My question is because of this could i really struggle in the computer science degree programme ?

    Give me your thoughts on the involvement of mathematics and computer science.

    I remember having to PROVE 1 + 1 = 2. 5 pages of formula to do it at the time. Completely rediculous but back then there wasn't much going on it IT so they padded it out a lot with mathematics.

    These days there are far more interesting IT courses out there that don't require so much maths but if you think about the profession itself, a logical mathematics/physics mind is a standard requirement for degree level.

    Still, I managed it back then and I was cr.p at maths. Either choose a degree course without too much heavy maths (not too hard to find these days) or train yourself up in maths prior to going.
    Kam.
  • skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Thank you all for your advice !!! yeah computers is my passion and I will do it !!! One more question is the computer science stressful? I know some people who does engineering and medicinal they get a lot of work and some drop out of it. I want to know will the computer science programme be stressful and will it be a challenge to graduate?

    Please share your experience.
    well, in my whopping 1.5 semesters of being in a part time CS program, it hasn't been all that stressful. But I've seen some of my fellow students crack under the pressure of spreading themselves too thin. I work part time and go to school part time and do certs also, and I try to find time to spend with the hubby and dog as well. It's been working out pretty well so far but I haven't gotten too deep into the program. I take my first 300 level classes this fall, and my first 400 level classes in spring. I have a BS already so I've got it a bit easier than some folks - most of my core prerequisites are taken care of, and I'm (hopefully) switching over to the masters program this fall.

    I think anything that's worth doing is challenging, but if you really want it and put some effort into it, it can be done. I don't think CS is as demanding as med school and not quite as heady/intensely mathematical as engineering, but it's challenging in its own way and that will vary by the program you're in. My program is heavy in programming, and I'm really loving it so far.
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  • skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    Kaminsky wrote: »
    I remember having to PROVE 1 + 1 = 2. 5 pages of formula to do it at the time. Completely rediculous but back then there wasn't much going on it IT so they padded it out a lot with mathematics.
    Sounds like my discrete structures class, where we had to prove that a +b = b + a, a = a, etc. I didn't see the point at first, but it was a great exercise in logic and problem solving.
    Currently Studying For: Nothing (cert-wise, anyway)
    Next Up: Security+, 291?

    Enrolled in Masters program: CS 2011 expected completion
  • XcluzivXcluziv Member Posts: 513
    skrpune wrote: »
    My CS bachelors program only requires up to precalculus, and some other math classes if you go for certain non required topics/classes. We're also required to either take discrete mathematics from the math department, or discrete structures within the CS department. My program is obviously not all that math intensive.

    The only area where higher math comes in is the grad program, where you need Calc III for one class & statistics for another class...but only one of those classes is required and only for the MIS concentration - the straight computer science masters track doesn't require any more math.

    So the math intensity level will vary from program to program. Don't let math scare you or psyche you out or keep you from going for a CS degree if that's what you want. You can DO it!

    I wish we could have stopped at precal.

    I would say that you need a leasta decent background in math in order to finish up. In my current matriculation thus far I have taken courses like: Cal I &II, Statistics, Linear Algebra, and Discrete Mathematics. All which are passable but you have to work at it. For CS electives you can take some other CS classes but also math classes will count too. I know BIS majors only have to worry about Cal if you wanted to go that route.
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  • XcluzivXcluziv Member Posts: 513
    skrpune wrote: »
    Sounds like my discrete structures class, where we had to prove that a +b = b + a, a = a, etc. I didn't see the point at first, but it was a great exercise in logic and problem solving.

    Yeah, thats how it was in my discrete math class.....if not P then Q, if and only if...yadayadayada.....had me like this icon_scratch.gif @ first then I caught on...that good ole logicicon_rolleyes.gif
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  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,089 ■■■■□□□□□□
    ipconfig.all

    buy jason gibson's videos on math they are decents priced and very very good.

    i used these and class room training on advanced math but my son used these and he loved them and he is doesnt like math..

    Math Tutor DVD - Math Help, Algebra Help, Calculus Help, Physics Help, and everything in between.

    great to supplement your class and books

    in my CS degree I had to go up to Calc II. , Lin Alg, Discrete Math, Stat.
    Physics and Chemistry also but this guys is awesome!
    Everything is a system and if you can understand systems, it is much easier.
    step 1, step2 etc....kind of like baking a cake! ;) a lot of cake! hahhaha
    Computer Science really helps you think better..
    I am not a great programmer but I have done some cools things
    and I know it has improved my thought process maybe not my typing skills or grammer ahahhaha hahahaa ;)
  • SepiraphSepiraph Member Posts: 179 ■■□□□□□□□□
    skrpune wrote: »
    Sounds like my discrete structures class, where we had to prove that a +b = b + a, a = a, etc. I didn't see the point at first, but it was a great exercise in logic and problem solving.

    The point is that certain rules of mathematics that we have taken for granted are just that, they can be broken and this leads to interesting and useful results. e.g. vector multiplication is anti-commutative. The rules themselves determine the structure of rings, fields, group etc.
  • brad-brad- Member Posts: 1,218
    I did my B.S. in CIS.

    We did have to take all the calculus courses, but the rest we could substitute statistics and business statistics.

    They were difficult, and in the end, pretty much useless in the area of study. Granted I work in more of a database and admin/helpdesk role, but I havent needed to integrate or differentiate anything...or use any of that knowledge at all. It's just part of being a well rounded student...which is sometimes nice, sometimes just an obvious $$ machine for universities.
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