Hardware

controlcontrol Posts: 309Member
Hi,

I have looked at the stickys regarding Hardware for a home lab during my CCNA study, and I see posts are years old. My question is, is the hardware still relevant for me sitting the exam next year, or what sort of equipment do I need to ensure I have the required hardware for passing the CCNA?

Thanks icon_smile.gif

Comments

  • 7255carl7255carl Posts: 1,544Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Hi control,
    you will find that the current CCNA material is based around 1841 routers and 2960 switches, these are available from the usual sources (ebay etc) but will set you back a good chunk of cash, i am currently studying CCNA and using 2600 routers(x3) and 2950 switches(x3) which cover the vast majority of what you will require and at a fraction of the cost,

    welcome to TE and good luck with the CCNA studies

    Carl
    W.I.P CCNA Cyber Ops
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users
    control wrote: »
    Hi,

    I have looked at the stickys regarding Hardware for a home lab during my CCNA study, and I see posts are years old. My question is, is the hardware still relevant for me sitting the exam next year, or what sort of equipment do I need to ensure I have the required hardware for passing the CCNA?

    Thanks icon_smile.gif


    I think Mike would say you need 3-4 routers, and 3 switches. That Said I have 3 1721s (max mem and 12.4 advanced,) 1 2610 (Frame relay switch but I don't use it that much) and 2 2950s (latest os). If I had a suggestion to make to you it would be either this:

    3 3640s (with 1T wics and possible a FE port)
    1 2610 (or something to act as a FR switch)
    1 3550 (this will be my next purchase, along with some crypto cards for my 1721s)
    2 2950 or 60 (which ever you can afford)

    I think you should be able to cover all of the objectives if you had the aforementioned equipment along with cables, wics, rack, etc. I would suggest to you that if money is a problem, you can use 1721s to do just able everything, they are generally cheap on ebay, very quiet but the are not mountable (which becomes very important if you are strapped for space like I am icon_wink.gif). The aforementioned list gives you a clear upgrade path to the ccnp.

    Now if you want to go the routerless, gns3 route, you could go with just the switches (and maybe an extra one). Gns3 requires either a beast of a windows box, or a well speced Linux box. It can be a pain to set up and you may encounter other issues (non ccna releated issues). If you do some googling you can find plenty of sites to help you out. Me personally I think you should go with the aforementioned list or 1721s if you want something cheaper. Real gear has taught me things I would never know using Packet Tracer or GNS3, and I think you should use it at least up to the CCNA. From there you might want to ditch it. Just remember to copy the ios (via x modem* or tftp) to you machine so you can use the GNS3.

    How much do you work with cisco on a daily bases?


    *If you can avoid this, please do because this **** takes for ******* ever. OMG long story short, an hour+ wait time is not uncommon.
  • controlcontrol Posts: 309Member
    Thanks to you both.

    Just to make you aware, I am completely new to CISCO so please excuse my lack of knowledge in all things CISCO.
    I'm from a server / desktop /voice background.
    We do have Cisco Switches / Routers onsite but closest I get to adminstering them is patching cables!

    For the routers, what are the minumin interfaces required? e.g Are serial ports a must?
    Also the Cisco IOS - do I need a specific version for the routers, and do the switches use the same IOS or is this completely different?
    I have a good few books for study but to be honest, none seem to explain or answer my questions above and seem to assume prior knowledge also.

    Thanks in advance
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users
    control wrote: »
    Thanks to you both.

    Just to make you aware, I am completely new to CISCO so please excuse my lack of knowledge in all things CISCO.
    I'm from a server / desktop /voice background.
    We do have Cisco Switches / Routers onsite but closest I get to adminstering them is patching cables!

    For the routers, what are the minumin interfaces required? e.g Are serial ports a must?
    Also the Cisco IOS - do I need a specific version for the routers, and do the switches use the same IOS or is this completely different?
    I have a good few books for study but to be honest, none seem to explain or answer my questions above and seem to assume prior knowledge also.

    Thanks in advance

    Serial ports or t1 ports are a must for Frame-relay, ppp, and hdlc. I think 1 serial port+ 1 FAST ethernet port (technically router on a stick needs a FE port).
    The 12.4 Train of IOS' are you best bet and if you can get a 12.4 Advanced IP Services, you have the mother load. Try to get 12.4 at least for your "main routers" and 12.3 for your FR switch (at least). Anything lower and you start running the risk of commands not being supports and other stuff.
    Lack of knowledge is ok, I am taking my CCNA on Monday (wish me luck). I started the journey several months ago and due to changing jobs, getting sick, changing cars, and other things, It got put to the back burner. I have taken the test and failed it by a few points. But I have learn some interesting things. My new job allows me to work in with routers daily, even if I only get to use the show commands. You can do it, it will take sometime, but you can kill this thing. If I had to make one suggestion to you, I would say take the 2 test route. Makes the information more palatable. Most people go this route. I am not because I simple want to kill it all in one blow.
    Just focus on why you want to do this and then you will be able to get it done.
  • controlcontrol Posts: 309Member
    Thanks a lot for your time and getting back to me knwminus!
    Much appreciated

    All the best for Monday
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