**JUNOS router emulation in GNS3**

yes, this is it my friends. The big break we've all waited patiently for. May I present to you the newest version of GNS3 which incorporates Junos router emulation:

GNS3 0.7RC1 | GNS3

Use the following tutorial for installation. Again, not quite as easy to install just yet, but your patience will pay off.

Olive reloaded or how to emulate Juniper routers | GNS3

Man, the JNCIP and JNCIE are looking pretty nice right about now :]
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Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    It may be time to give GNS3 another shot. Thanks for the link!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • ilcram19-2ilcram19-2 Posts: 436Banned
    OMG that is the coolest thing ever
  • TheShadowTheShadow Posts: 1,057Registered Members
    Aldur can we have your thoughts pretty please :)
    Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of technology?... The Shadow DO
  • AldurAldur Juniper Moderator Posts: 1,460Registered Members
    This does look promising. I'm gonna play around with it and let you guys know what I think.
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
  • TheShadowTheShadow Posts: 1,057Registered Members
    Thanks I am sure we will look forward to it.
    Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of technology?... The Shadow DO
  • hoogen82hoogen82 Posts: 272Registered Members
    There is a guy in groupstudy who was helpful in providing graphical frontend for Qemu..Vladmir K

    RapidShare Webhosting + Webspace

    The link he provided..

    And some tips provided.

    This version correctly works with multicast on fxp interfaces with JunOS prior to 9.1 or em interfaces with 9.1 or later

    Application use udp-sockets for connections between router interfaces (you
    can see it in parameter list, example sport=10001 dport=10004)
    If you run another copy of application or incorrectly closed previous copy,
    it can utilize already used port and qemu cannot build udp-sockets.
    You can check used udp-ports with command

    netstat -all
    ...
    UDP pn-15:10001 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10002 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10003 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10004 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10005 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10017 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10018 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10019 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10020 *:*
    UDP pn-15:10021 *:*
    ...

    You need change base udp port number (10000 by default) to another value in
    topology properties.


    // cant figure out how to move devices around..
    Click mouse button on router. Yellow square appear in a router center. Move
    the pointer of mouse to the square (the cruciform mouse cursor will
    appear), click left mouse button and, holding, move router.

    //i cant use more than 1 fxp interface...
    you can use 8 fxp a 8 em interfaces. In router properties you can set field
    "fxp interfaces count" in range 1-8 (1 when you create router)
    Field "Interfaces count (total)" is sum em+fxp interfaces
    IS-IS Sleeps.
    BGP peers are quiet.
    Something must be wrong.
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    yes, this is it my friends. The big break we've all waited patiently for. May I present to you the newest version of GNS3 which incorporates Junos router emulation:

    GNS3 0.7RC1 | GNS3

    Use the following tutorial for installation. Again, not quite as easy to install just yet, but your patience will pay off.

    Olive reloaded or how to emulate Juniper routers | GNS3

    Man, the JNCIP and JNCIE are looking pretty nice right about now :]

    Cool. I will try this. Do you need a Junos image?
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Registered Members
    yes, this is it my friends. The big break we've all waited patiently for. May I present to you the newest version of GNS3 which incorporates Junos router emulation:


    I bet this was the break Juniper was waiting for also. After I finish up my CCNP i'm going to take a long look at Juniper. I'm on them everyday, but since they are the heavy lifters of the network I dare not venture pass the show commands. This will put a lot of us in a position to learn more about how things work on this side of the world.
    Currently Reading

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  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    shodown wrote: »
    I bet this was the break Juniper was waiting for also. After I finish up my CCNP i'm going to take a long look at Juniper. I'm on them everyday, but since they are the heavy lifters of the network I dare not venture pass the show commands. This will put a lot of us in a position to learn more about how things work on this side of the world.

    You could have used Olive but I couldn't be bothered with all the p1ssing aroung setting all that up.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Registered Members
    Turgon wrote: »
    You could have used Olive but I couldn't be bothered with all the p1ssing aroung setting all that up.


    You hit it on the head. I didn't have time to be trying to figure out Olive's and GNS3/Dynamips is Free99 no gear to buy for each olive.
    Currently Reading

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  • seraphusseraphus Posts: 307Registered Members
    Turgon wrote: »
    Cool. I will try this. Do you need a Junos image?

    Yes, just as you need(ed) a real IOS.



    Olive reloaded or how to emulate Juniper routers | GNS3
    Lab first, ask questions later
  • routepoisonroutepoison Posts: 10Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    That is great news!

    I wonder is it possible to emulate SRX series ?
  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Registered Members
    shodown wrote: »
    I bet this was the break Juniper was waiting for also.
    Not really. JunOS has been running inside VMs for years now since it is a FreeBSD based x86 box. GNS3 just puts a GUI on the front of QEMU which does the actual work of emulating a x86 box.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Registered Members
    tiersten wrote: »
    Not really. JunOS has been running inside VMs for years now since it is a FreeBSD based x86 box. GNS3 just puts a GUI on the front of QEMU which does the actual work of emulating a x86 box.


    I respectfully disagree. You can do all that stuff and get it up, however I have only seen the uber geeks doing that. Most of the normal IT guys that I know haven't touched a VM or a olive. GNS3 has been huge for most. Its easy to setup and get going. A lot of people just don't want the hassle of trying to fight with systems and work arounds to get them going.
    Currently Reading

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  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Registered Members
    shodown wrote: »
    I respectfully disagree. You can do all that stuff and get it up, however I have only seen the uber geeks doing that. Most of the normal IT guys that I know haven't touched a VM or a olive. GNS3 has been huge for most. Its easy to setup and get going. A lot of people just don't want the hassle of trying to fight with systems and work arounds to get them going.
    Have you actually read the guide? The JunOS for GNS3 guide is the same as the step by step guides on how to install FreeBSD + JunOS on a VM.

    It doesn't require an "uber geek" to set this up. If you're comfortable with the IOS and JunOS CLI then you're perfectly capable of following the guides and making your own JunOS VM or Olive.
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned
    Um, if you aren't an uber geek, what the hell are you doing trying to emulate a cli router os? ;)
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    I thought about building out an Olive a couple of years ago, but once I looked into it I was put off by the hardware requirements and time required messing around to get it working. Similarly with dynamips I put it off as I always had real hardware at my disposal. I think I will have a go at the GNS thing this weekend.
  • tarintarin Posts: 2Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hi friend, I am interested in the software from the guy of groupstudy but the link that you have posted is just only for the patched version of qemu, not for the graphical front end :) I have gone to groupstudy but the link that Vladimir posts is not longer avalaible..

    Thanks in advance.
  • TheShadowTheShadow Posts: 1,057Registered Members
    I don't know which one offhand but everything in groupstudy is archived month to month for several years. Trace them down from the main web page.
    Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of technology?... The Shadow DO
  • tarintarin Posts: 2Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks TheShadow, but in this case it is impossible, the author of the software uploaded it to Rapidshare and posted the link at groupstudy. This link is not longer avalaible due to a lack of activity (no frequent download). I guess that some of you guys have downloaded this software to try it.. it will be great if you share this free software :)

    Thanks!
  • rfult001rfult001 Posts: 407Registered Members
    Don't know if this is the same frontend he posted but it works:
    Download Qemu Manager
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Posts: 4,024Registered Members
    shodown wrote: »
    I respectfully disagree. You can do all that stuff and get it up, however I have only seen the uber geeks doing that. Most of the normal IT guys that I know haven't touched a VM or a olive. GNS3 has been huge for most. Its easy to setup and get going. A lot of people just don't want the hassle of trying to fight with systems and work arounds to get them going.

    Alright, please understand that I'm not trying to pick on you, but you have a few misconceptions. As tiersten has pointed out, GNS3 is just another VM monitor under the hood. Getting this up and running in VMWare is not much more difficult. This just happens to be a very well written guide.

    And most normal IT guys won't be touching, much less configuring, a core router. If you're not an ubergeek, you're not touching my network. This mindset of everything needing to be quick and easy in regards to learning network engineering as a trade disturbs me.
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    Alright, please understand that I'm not trying to pick on you, but you have a few misconceptions. As tiersten has pointed out, GNS3 is just another VM monitor under the hood. Getting this up and running in VMWare is not much more difficult. This just happens to be a very well written guide.

    And most normal IT guys won't be touching, much less configuring, a core router. If you're not an ubergeek, you're not touching my network. This mindset of everything needing to be quick and easy in regards to learning network engineering as a trade disturbs me.

    I just couldn't put the time aside with so much going on elsewhere but you make a fair point.

    Im afraid that trend has been going on for a while and it's separating the men from the boys in networking. Back in 2001 the developers I supported had CCO documents covering things like TCP intercept and used snoop to debug problems with transaction software connections. So you really had to make an effort to stay on top. Prior to that just getting something working which is considered simple today like a sound card for example might require a lot of effort. We spent a lot of time working with readme files and inadequate documentation. There is a lot more separation between technicians and end users these days and with the 'two clicks and its done' mentality it's not surprising many engineers dont know what proxy arp does or can follow a TCPdump properly. You don't learn it all from study tracks. You have to do it and work it out in the field. Ease and speed is not always conducive to that.
  • CCIEWANNABECCIEWANNABE Posts: 465Banned
    I will be setting this up shortly on my GNS3 server. I'll post videos of it working when I get it done. Like others have said, this isn't solely GNS3/Juniper, you still have to download Freebsd and run stuff in it and tie that into a "cloud" node in GNS3. So what you end up with if you are using all Juniper nodes in GNS3 is a Bunch of Cloud nodes I guess :]

    I think the makers are trying to simplify the product and interaction with Juniper devices. So, this being the first version incorporating Juniper devices may seem kinda "rough". I guarantee they will come out with later versions that are much easier to install. Maybe like an all-in-one mega download with freebsd and all the other apps, since they are all FREE this makes it easy for them to do.

    Time to lab it up!!
  • taradotarado Posts: 1Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks rfult001 but qemu manager is not what I am looking for :) I guess that Vladimir's software helps you to create and link virtual machines emulating routers (something like gns3), and solves the multicast problem.. I have solved this problem manually, creating and linking routers "by hand", but I think it would be much better If I had a tool that simplifies this task so I can focus in creating my labs :)
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Registered Members
    Alright, please understand that I'm not trying to pick on you, but you have a few misconceptions. As tiersten has pointed out, GNS3 is just another VM monitor under the hood. Getting this up and running in VMWare is not much more difficult. This just happens to be a very well written guide.

    And most normal IT guys won't be touching, much less configuring, a core router. If you're not an ubergeek, you're not touching my network. This mindset of everything needing to be quick and easy in regards to learning network engineering as a trade disturbs me.


    I know everybody has there views on how they see and view things, but you must understand that I'm viewing this from a completely different stand point. I hate going to far in different directions when there is already a path that I want to get. You can either rent real routers our buy them. I don't want to spend a day or 2 trying to get a olive to work, I really don't want to be bothered with it. As far as the Juniper in a VM I have never toyed with it, but it maybe a simple setup. I know I got GNS3 setup in 10 min. It took me over a day to get Dynamips setup. Now that they will continue to work on JUNOS for GNS3 I will take a stab at it as soon as my CCNP is finished. Bottom line I know this is what will work for me. Others may have different needs. My main point about my main statement stand. This will help out Juniper I think more than the previous was to emulate there products in the past.
    Currently Reading

    CUCM SRND 9x/10, UCCX SRND 10x, QOS SRND, SIP Trunking Guide, anything contact center related
  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Registered Members
    shodown wrote: »
    I don't want to spend a day or 2 trying to get a olive to work, I really don't want to be bothered with it. As far as the Juniper in a VM I have never toyed with it, but it maybe a simple setup. I know I got GNS3 setup in 10 min. It took me over a day to get Dynamips setup.
    Whilst using Dynamips directly isn't very userfriendly because of the configuration files necessary, the steps you did to get JunOS running inside QEMU/GNS3 is exactly the same as if you was trying to get it running in any other VM system. That is my point. You've already done the necessary steps so you've not actually made it any easier.
    shodown wrote: »
    Now that they will continue to work on JUNOS for GNS3 I will take a stab at it as soon as my CCNP is finished.
    They could provide a FreeBSD VM disk image but you'd still be required to install the JunOS portions yourself via the CLI. The PIX/ASA images are ready to run because they contain the Finesse/Linux OS inside the image so you don't actually need anything else.
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Registered Members
    Maybe like an all-in-one mega download with freebsd and all the other apps, since they are all FREE this makes it easy for them to do.
    I doubt the Juniper software is FREE. Same for the Cisco IOS and PIX/ASA Images. icon_rolleyes.gif

    If someone can't follow step by step instructions and is relying on someone else creating a simple All-In-One software solution for them, they probably don't have much of a future in any advanced IT position.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Posts: 4,024Registered Members
    shodown wrote: »
    I know everybody has there views on how they see and view things, but you must understand that I'm viewing this from a completely different stand point. I hate going to far in different directions when there is already a path that I want to get. You can either rent real routers our buy them. I don't want to spend a day or 2 trying to get a olive to work, I really don't want to be bothered with it. As far as the Juniper in a VM I have never toyed with it, but it maybe a simple setup. I know I got GNS3 setup in 10 min. It took me over a day to get Dynamips setup. Now that they will continue to work on JUNOS for GNS3 I will take a stab at it as soon as my CCNP is finished. Bottom line I know this is what will work for me. Others may have different needs. My main point about my main statement stand. This will help out Juniper I think more than the previous was to emulate there products in the past.

    Have you even set this up? You're missing a few points. You say you don't want to spend a day or two getting an olive to work... setting up JUNOS in GNS3 is setting up an olive. You say you've never toyed with Juniper in a VM.... if you've set it up in GNS3, yes, you have. QEMU is, conceptually, the same as VMWare - it emulates a processor and hardware environment so you can run a guest os.

    For your benefit, I sincerely suggest you become familiar with how the software you're using works. Otherwise, you'll just become a zombie that can read and follow instructions, you won't really learn anything. When you get that frantic call at 3am about the network being broken, there's not a book that's going to tell you how to fix it.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Registered Members
    Have you even set this up? You're missing a few points. You say you don't want to spend a day or two getting an olive to work... setting up JUNOS in GNS3 is setting up an olive. You say you've never toyed with Juniper in a VM.... if you've set it up in GNS3, yes, you have. QEMU is, conceptually, the same as VMWare - it emulates a processor and hardware environment so you can run a guest os.

    For your benefit, I sincerely suggest you become familiar with how the software you're using works. Otherwise, you'll just become a zombie that can read and follow instructions, you won't really learn anything. When you get that frantic call at 3am about the network being broken, there's not a book that's going to tell you how to fix it.


    If you have read my past post I have said that I have never toyed with it. I looked at the blogs of people who have setup olives and said I wouldn't toy with it due to the problems people have had.

    Also I have never did the VM thing. I just saw that GNS3 had it available, and that they were planning on making it easier in the future which to me is great I don't like using my time to fumble with those things, I like to get something up and going right away.

    I think we are going to have to agree to disagree on how we conduct business. You guys know what works for you, and I have know what works for me. We are all here to get better at our craft, but we have different methods to our madness. Nones it better than the others., Just because some don't want to fumble around with emulators doesn't mean they aren't capable at the job. I'm stepping out of this post cause I don't' like the direction that I see it going. I wish everybody the best on stepping into the world off juniper. Our entire core of our network runs on on Juniper and I plan on getting certified I can't wait to get started actually. Good luck everybody.icon_thumright.gif
    Currently Reading

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