How does one manage satelite wan connections?

tdeantdean Posts: 520Member
i saw a job description and they mentioned the fact they have 5 different locations. one is connected via vpn, another satelite.... i dont even know what that means? how would i manage that? what if it goes down? am i outside climbing all over a huge antenna to see what wrong??

icon_silent.gif

Comments

  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Member
    tdean wrote: »
    i saw a job description and they mentioned the fact they have 5 different locations. one is connected via vpn, another satelite.... i dont even know what that means? how would i manage that? what if it goes down? am i outside climbing all over a huge antenna to see what wrong??

    icon_silent.gif


    You have your dish and associated gear then you have your modem. From there you will have a modem connection to your router. We had them in the navy. Not all that complex.
    Currently Reading

    CUCM SRND 9x/10, UCCX SRND 10x, QOS SRND, SIP Trunking Guide, anything contact center related
  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Member
    What shodown said. If anything goes wrong then you get whoever is providing that satelite link to come in and fix it. This is after the basic checks of is the box still on? Does the box have any error lights? Has somebody gone out to check that the dish doesn't have snow/leaves on it? The dishes are generally very small as well.

    All it means is that they've got a location which has bad connectivity in that area from the various carriers. This generally means it is located in the middle of nowhere or the local carriers just don't service that area.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Member
    tiersten wrote: »
    What shodown said. If anything goes wrong then you get whoever is providing that satelite link to come in and fix it. This is after the basic checks of is the box still on? Does the box have any error lights? Has somebody gone out to check that the dish doesn't have snow/leaves on it? The dishes are generally very small as well.

    All it means is that they've got a location which has bad connectivity in that area from the various carriers. This generally means it is located in the middle of nowhere or the local carriers just don't service that area.


    Thanks I did leave out some details. I had it all in my head, just forgot to bang the keys with my thoughts.icon_thumright.gif
    Currently Reading

    CUCM SRND 9x/10, UCCX SRND 10x, QOS SRND, SIP Trunking Guide, anything contact center related
  • mgeorgemgeorge Posts: 777Member
    Cisco has a SATCOM network module called the NM-1VSAT-GILAT

    1.5Mbps up 10Mbps down and works with several satellite internet providers.

    Check it out;
    Cisco IP VSAT Satellite WAN Module - Products & Services - Cisco Systems
    There is no place like 127.0.0.1
  • hermeszdatahermeszdata Posts: 225Member
    tiersten wrote: »
    All it means is that they've got a location which has bad connectivity in that area from the various carriers. This generally means it is located in the middle of nowhere or the local carriers just don't service that area.

    There are many enterprises that run VSAT connections as a failover even having T1 or OC connections. This became evermore popular after Katrina.

    John
    John
    Current Progress:
    Studying:
    CCNA Security - 60%, CCNA Wireless - 80%, ROUTE - 10% (Way behind due to major Wireless Project)
    Exams Passed:
    CCNA - 640-802 - 17 Jan 2011 -- CVOICE v6 - 642-436 - 28 Feb 2011
    2011 Goals
    CCNP/CCNP:Voice
Sign In or Register to comment.