Aiming For Thursday, May 13th...

superman859superman859 Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
So, I've read through Meyer's All-In-One Network+ book front to back and reviewed it. I've also gone through the 10 practice exams that they sell and can score around 90% on them first try (starting around test 4).

But I'm still nervous like crazy! It will be my first certification and I just don't know how to know if I am ready! What if those practice exams are easier than the real test? What if the book leaves out key concepts all together?

I have a voucher in hand...I just need to register for a date...I'm thinking May 13, because I'd like to get it before I leave town for the summer.

Anyone use just the Meyers book and perform well? I've seen a lot of people prepare with the sybex book, but haven't seen as many comments about the All-In-One book.
Degrees: B.S. Computer Science, B.S. Mathematics

Certifications: Network+, Security+

In-Progress: M.S. Computer Science, CEH

Comments

  • REID8968REID8968 Member Posts: 98 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Good luck! If you're doing that well on the practice exams, you should be ready. I used a variety of materials..especially the tech notes on this site! Be sure to go over them too.
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Sounds like you're ready. Be sure to know your ports and your different cables and such.
    Good luck!
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • superman859superman859 Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I know ports and cables well. The main things that I miss on practice exams are things I simply disagree with. To me, they just aren't clear enough I guess, and I put an answer that is right, but not what they are looking for.

    An example: "What Layer of the OSI seven layer model ensures reliable communication". The correct answer is supposedly "session", although I still think that is wrong. To me, I would say Transport (at least when considering TCP), because TCP ensure the reliable communication. Granted, UDP is also at the transport layer and does not, in which case it reliability would be placed at the application level.

    They say "the session layer handles the connection between two machines, ensuring reliable communication. The transport layer assembles and disassembles packets".

    Perhaps my understanding of the 7-layer model isn't as strong as it could be (mainly in the fields that differ from the TCP/IP model), but it's these little things that get me - not so much "know it or you dont" such as port numbers. These are the only things I really worry about.

    But oh well! I guess I should just take a chance and go take it! Thursday it is.
    Degrees: B.S. Computer Science, B.S. Mathematics

    Certifications: Network+, Security+

    In-Progress: M.S. Computer Science, CEH
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Looks like your good to go, worst case is that you don't pass but find out which areas you need to study.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • MonkerzMonkerz Member Posts: 842
    An example: "What Layer of the OSI seven layer model ensures reliable communication". The correct answer is supposedly "session", although I still think that is wrong. To me, I would say Transport (at least when considering TCP), because TCP ensure the reliable communication. Granted, UDP is also at the transport layer and does not, in which case it reliability would be placed at the application level.

    They say "the session layer handles the connection between two machines, ensuring reliable communication. The transport layer assembles and disassembles packets".
    The session layer's roll is to build and break down connections, thus handling the connection between two machines. That is why it is the correct answer.

    Kind of like an old style switchboard operator, patching calls together.

    The session layer says, "Hey, Transport Layer!, this one must be reliable!" :)
  • superman859superman859 Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Monkerz wrote: »
    The session layer's roll is to build and break down connections, thus handling the connection between two machines. That is why it is the correct answer.

    Kind of like an old style switchboard operator, patching calls together.

    The session layer says, "Hey, Transport Layer!, this one must be reliable!" :)

    Yes, it may build and break down the connections, but I don't see how that makes it reliable communication. To me, that just makes it possible communication. The reliable aspect comes from other mechanisms such as either TCP ACKs or app level code.
    Degrees: B.S. Computer Science, B.S. Mathematics

    Certifications: Network+, Security+

    In-Progress: M.S. Computer Science, CEH
  • MonkerzMonkerz Member Posts: 842
    Yes, it may build and break down the connections, but I don't see how that makes it reliable communication. To me, that just makes it possible communication. The reliable aspect comes from other mechanisms such as either TCP ACKs or app level code.

    What makes TCP reliable and UDP not? The connection. Sure TCP has flow controls and reliable data delivery services, but all in all the connection does it. What negotiates the logical connection prior to sending data? Session Layer...
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Hey superman, I hate to say it like this but I think you're probably more than ready for the test now and you're overthinking things. Usually when you understand the material well enough to question their answers you understand the material well enough to ace a CompTIA test. This is CompTIA Net+ and you're looking at it like it's CCNA material. Monkerz has been good explaining it because he's studying CCNA level material.
    Knwminus law states that CCNA = Net+ ^^9
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • superman859superman859 Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Well, we will see how it turns out today. I take it later this afternoon. I imagine I will end up missing some because of disagreements between me and the test (I'm stubborn sometimes!) or a few that I simply do not know, but I suppose that is why we can still pass with an 80%.
    Degrees: B.S. Computer Science, B.S. Mathematics

    Certifications: Network+, Security+

    In-Progress: M.S. Computer Science, CEH
  • rogue2shadowrogue2shadow CISSP, GXPN, OSCE, OSCP, OSWP, eMAPT, CEH, CNDA, A+, Network+, Security+ Member Posts: 1,501 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I wish you luck! I know you'll destroy it icon_cheers.gif

  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Good luck. I'm sure you'll come back here saying you nailed it and commenting on how easy it was. When I took it I felt underprepared and after 40 minutes it was over with a 865.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I don't think you will come back saying it was easy, but that doesn't mean you can't get a good score.

    Good luck
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • superman859superman859 Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Passed with 834.

    You're right - I wouldn't say it was easy but I still passed plenty well enough.

    For me, there was a lot of cabling / cable testing / hardware tools related questions and for some I didn't like my answer options so I just had to pick one (ex: One I would have picked "cable strippers" but that wasn't an option, even though it's definitely the best tool for the job). They needed an "other" option IMO! icon_lol.gif

    There were also a few scenarios I thought were not specific enough so it was unclear and I just had to take my best shot.

    Next up is Security+ and CEH.
    Degrees: B.S. Computer Science, B.S. Mathematics

    Certifications: Network+, Security+

    In-Progress: M.S. Computer Science, CEH
  • MonkerzMonkerz Member Posts: 842
    Congrats on the Pass!!! icon_cool.gif

    They want you to pick the best answer out of the answers available. That is why I don't understand CompTIA exams. They're rather easy, when you look at vendor specific exams. I think they should have been written exams, multiple choice don't challenge the candidate enough, IMO...

    Which command do you use to add, remove, or change a routing table's static routes on a Microsoft Windows 2000, or later, network?

    A. Bologna
    B. Route
    C. Homer
    D. Shamu
    E. Ipconfig
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    icon_cheers.gif Congrats icon_cheers.gif
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□


    For me, there was a lot of cabling / cable testing / hardware tools related questions and for some I didn't like my answer options so I just had to pick one (ex: One I would have picked "cable strippers" but that wasn't an option, even though it's definitely the best tool for the job). They needed an "other" option IMO! icon_lol.gif

    Probably would have been crimping tool
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • superman859superman859 Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
    earweed wrote: »
    Probably would have been crimping tool

    Perhaps you are right, provided the crimper contains the strippers and cutter (as most do, I suppose...although I've used them very little so this is why I don't know). The question was about which is best before adding the connector (thus before actually crimping)
    Degrees: B.S. Computer Science, B.S. Mathematics

    Certifications: Network+, Security+

    In-Progress: M.S. Computer Science, CEH
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I've never made my own connection with a crimping tool but the Labsim video showed it and their practice tests gave both as choices is how I guessed what you were probably asked. The last connector I made myself was RS 232 back in the 80's and I had to solder every %$%%$% wire.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • SelfmadeSelfmade Member Posts: 268
    Monkerz wrote: »
    Congrats on the Pass!!! icon_cool.gif

    They want you to pick the best answer out of the answers available. That is why I don't understand CompTIA exams. They're rather easy, when you look at vendor specific exams. I think they should have been written exams, multiple choice don't challenge the candidate enough, IMO...

    Which command do you use to add, remove, or change a routing table's static routes on a Microsoft Windows 2000, or later, network?

    A. Bologna
    B. Route
    C. Homer
    D. Shamu
    E. Ipconfig

    The answer is obviously bologna, cause I'm too hungry to add, remove, or change a routing table's static routes.
    It's not important to add reptutation points to others, but to be nice and spread good karma everywhere you go.
  • burner27burner27 Member Posts: 75 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Monkerz wrote: »
    Congrats on the Pass!!! icon_cool.gif

    They want you to pick the best answer out of the answers available. That is why I don't understand CompTIA exams. They're rather easy, when you look at vendor specific exams. I think they should have been written exams, multiple choice don't challenge the candidate enough, IMO...

    Which command do you use to add, remove, or change a routing table's static routes on a Microsoft Windows 2000, or later, network?

    A. Bologna
    B. Route
    C. Homer
    D. Shamu
    E. Ipconfig


    It's Shamu -duh!!!!! ;)
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