7yrs in IT, Can't find a JOB. PLEASE HELP!!!

FHERNANDEZFHERNANDEZ Posts: 9Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello Everyone,
Please guide me in the right direction icon_exclaim.gif

I am currently unemployed for close to a year now and desperate to get back in the field. have had no luck in finding contract/full time employment.

I have 7 years of experience in the IT field.
I held roles in:
  • Desktop Support (1 year)
  • Software QA Analyst (3 years)
  • Technical Project Lead (3 years )
My background consists of: managing resources, QA, training staff, and being the hands on subject matter expert / technical lead for HW/SW upgrade projects (Windows 2000/XP/Vista OS environments). I also have basic networking experience.

I have an Associate's degree in Computer Support and network administration but NO CERTIFICATIONS icon_cry.gif

I have started self training on the comptia triple certifications (a+, net+, sec+) in order to get some certifications on my resume.

Also planning on taking a college course in order to obtain the "PMI CAPM Certification" (I would like the PMP but I do not meet the prerequisites).

  1. Am I on the right track? if not... What certifications should I get based on my experiences to put me in the best place to continue my career?
  2. Will the certifications that I am training on, going to help me get back on the field in a good technical, lead or management role in IT.
PLEASE HELP! icon_rolleyes.gif

Comments

  • brianeaglesfanbrianeaglesfan Posts: 130Member
    All of the CompTIA certs are considered to be entry-level, as is the CAPM. That's not to say though that they don't have value, and given that they lose their lifetime status after this year it may be worthwhile to pursue them. Given your experience I'd afterwards probably shoot for a mid to senior-level MS cert, like MCSA, MCSE, MCITP:SA, or MCITP:EA, if that's the path you want to continue down.

    In this job market employers can be picky as there are many talented folks vying for a few jobs, so anything you can do to make yourself stand out is good. I'd also consider going back to school for a BS or BA. In the meantime you might have to settle for getting a foot in the door somewhere by taking a position you're otherwise overqualified for, and try to work your way up. Good luck.
    Complete: MSMIS, MBA, EPIC certified
    In progress: CPHIMS, CAPM
  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Posts: 2,803Mod Mod
    Unfortunately that is the result of the current economic environment and the state of IT. Whats most likely hurting you is your lack of higher education, I would know. I also have just an A.S. in Information Technology and although I do have a Network+ to go along with my almost 6 years of IT experience, I cannot even get an interview. I even had one employer flat out tell me that I was their most qualified candidate experience wise and they would love to hire me but I need a bachelors degree because they were requiring it. Also with so few IT jobs to go around and so many people looking for work, employers are being super choosy and going for the most qualified candidates. The fact that we only have an Associates automatically weeds us out because there are people applying with bachelors, masters, MBA's, etc.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, eJPT, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CSAA, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: Python, OSCP Prep
    Next Up:​ OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (Python), Bash Scripting, Virtual Hacking Lab Coursework
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCPosts: 889Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    As said already on here, you need to improve your marketability by getting those certs. At least the A+ and N+ would be good, Security + isn't bad either. Anything that can help you improve your resume is a bonus. There are many companies that do require a A+ and with it being a relatively easy cert to gain it definitely can help you out.

    Touch out to old co-workers and use LinkedIn and join your local IT group. You need to network some more to get yourself noticed and use everything you can to land that position.

    Sadly, in this economy, it's a battle for the positions out there, but you may need to take a more entry level position that pays crap just so that you are working and hopefully you can move up in your new company or use that experience to help you land an even better job more in line with what you are used to.

    I had to suck it up for about 6 months working crap entry level jobs just to keep myself working and add to my experience and it has helped out quite alot as I recently landed a new position doing what i want to do (Desktop support) and will allow me to grow with my new company. Also the pay is a nice increase over what I was making before I was laid off.

    Keep on working hard and send out your resume for positions even if you are overqualified for them. And if you must, look out to another area and relocate if they have jobs that you want to do there.
  • thenjdukethenjduke Posts: 894Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Go for your B.S. degree. I got turned away from one job because I did not have it. They were trying to get me in without having it. Too bad I didn't because would have been a great job. I am working towards my B.S. now.
    CCNA, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDST, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, Working towards Networking BS. CCNP is Next.
  • sambuca69sambuca69 Posts: 262Member
    The thing that stinks is once you are away from IT for a long time, you almost "reset" to that of a complete newcomer to the field, in the eyes of potential employers.
  • djkdawgdjkdawg Posts: 2Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    FHERNANDEZ wrote: »
    Hello Everyone,
    Please guide me in the right direction icon_exclaim.gif

    I am currently unemployed for close to a year now and desperate to get back in the field. have had no luck in finding contract/full time employment.

    I have 7 years of experience in the IT field.
    I held roles in:
    • Desktop Support (1 year)
    • Software QA Analyst (3 years)
    • Technical Project Lead (3 years )
    My background consists of: managing resources, QA, training staff, and being the hands on subject matter expert / technical lead for HW/SW upgrade projects (Windows 2000/XP/Vista OS environments). I also have basic networking experience.

    I have an Associate's degree in Computer Support and network administration but NO CERTIFICATIONS icon_cry.gif

    I have started self training on the comptia triple certifications (a+, net+, sec+) in order to get some certifications on my resume.

    Also planning on taking a college course in order to obtain the "PMI CAPM Certification" (I would like the PMP but I do not meet the prerequisites).

    1. Am I on the right track? if not... What certifications should I get based on my experiences to put me in the best place to continue my career?
    2. Will the certifications that I am training on, going to help me get back on the field in a good technical, lead or management role in IT.
    PLEASE HELP! icon_rolleyes.gif

    just keep looking, i dont have that much experience and i dont have a degree, i used monster.com and found a desktop support/noc admin job and i was back in the working market with just an a+, but i am studying to get the more advanced certs!!
  • tomahawkeertomahawkeer Posts: 179Member
    I think this is my first post, so hopefully I can be helpful to you.

    I was recently not hired for a job, due to my lack of bachelors degree. I had the most experience, however they were requiring a BS. Even knowing the people doing the hiring (personally) they could not hire me even though they wanted too.

    In respect to finding a job, I would imagine if your having issues, you may be looking at higher end jobs, and with your experience level thats very possible, however, if you are in need of a job, dont be afraid to take a help desk job again. Its gets you back into the swing of things, and while the pay may not be what you are expecting, its better than nothing, and also more than likely better than unemployment.
  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Posts: 2,803Mod Mod
    thenjduke wrote: »
    Go for your B.S. degree. I got turned away from one job because I did not have it. They were trying to get me in without having it. Too bad I didn't because would have been a great job. I am working towards my B.S. now.

    Exactly. As myself and several others stated in this thread, a lack of atleast a Bachelors is detrimental. Its definitely holding me back.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, eJPT, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CSAA, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: Python, OSCP Prep
    Next Up:​ OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (Python), Bash Scripting, Virtual Hacking Lab Coursework
  • ipconfig.allipconfig.all Posts: 428Banned
    the market gets harder and harder, I have being looking for work for nearly a year and I have some I.T experience along with I.T certifications and no degree. icon_sad.gif
    Im a depressed loser :sad: none wants me.
  • ElvisGElvisG Posts: 167Member
    One thing that a lot of people don't do is get their resume professionally done. The cost is about $100 +/-. I can not recommend people do this enough. This is specialty true with mid to smaller companies.

    One website I would recommend is...

    resumetointerviews.com
  • keeranbrikeeranbri Posts: 97Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I guess I should not feel bad, however i am the other way around. I have my Bachelors degree in Technical Management, but I have no certifications under my Belt. I currently work in call center environment for 3 1/2 years, but it is not help desk. I'm doing consumer collections. I am working on getting my A+ and MCDST, do you think those are good starting certifications? or should I just go for the network+.

    I wanted to get out my work so bad, because I definetely do not like callilng people and harrasing them for money, but at the same time, I am glad that I have a job and getting the customer service experience that usually help desk positions require, right?

    do you think the certifications is just holding me back from that entry level IT position?
  • hex_omegahex_omega Posts: 183Member
    I'm not sure what the curriculum is for Technical Management. It might be best that you gain a few entry level certs to complement that degree.
  • votekvotek Posts: 7Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I agree with everyone who said pursue your B.S in Computer Science. The importance of higher education is their ability to teach you how to learn. The concepts being taught at most colleges can be applied to the ever changing technological landscape. I also agree with getting a microsoft cert, MCITP or something of that sort.

    I see a lot of individuals in my classes who have been laid off and somehow managed to get unemployment to pay for their education. I would look into that perhaps?

    Personally, I'm close to finishing my B.S in computer science and I was able to land a job because my friend was able to get my foot in the door. This is after putting 20+ applications in and interviewing at several other jobs. The takeaway is, a good recommendation can go a long way. I wish you the best.
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