Virtualization Learning

Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
For someone looking to learn more about Vmware/Virtualization has anyone read this book?
Amazon.com: Mastering VMware vSphere 4 (Computer/Tech) (9780470481387): Scott…

I also looked at this book as well to help me learn about the security aspects of virtualization:

Amazon.com: VMware vSphere and Virtual Infrastructure Security: Securing the Virtual Environment (9780137158003): Edward…

Most of our servers are virtualized and even though our other admin supports it, I want to learn more about it.

Comments

  • kalebkspkalebksp Posts: 1,033Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    The Mastering book is excellent, I haven't read the security one but have been meaning to.

    Read the books, try to strike up a conversation with the people that mange your VM environment so you can understand how it's setup, and maybe test it out a little at home. You can try out ESX/ESXi in Workstation 7.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    kalebksp wrote: »
    The Mastering book is excellent, I haven't read the security one but have been meaning to.

    Read the books, try to strike up a conversation with the people that mange your VM environment so you can understand how it's setup, and maybe test it out a little at home. You can try out ESX/ESXi in Workstation 7.

    Thanks. It is me and the other admin. On the one hand, I don't want him to think I want to take his job but on the other hand, I'd like to get the VCP someday (he has gone to the training but hasn't done the VCP).
  • kalebkspkalebksp Posts: 1,033Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    On the one hand, I don't want him to think I want to take his job

    Having only one person understand an environment is a horrible business practice. It's the human equivalent of a single point of failure, and it's generally a lot harder to replace a person than a piece of equipment. You and the other admin should try to share as much information as possible, both verbally and in written documentation. If this isn't a current practice start doing it yourself, write documentation about everything you setup and all the systems you work with.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    kalebksp wrote: »
    Having only one person understand an environment is a horrible business practice. It's the human equivalent of a single point of failure, and it's generally a lot harder to replace a person than a piece of equipment. You and the other admin should try to share as much information as possible, both verbally and in written documentation. If this isn't a current practice start doing it yourself, write documentation about everything you setup and all the systems you work with.

    You are 100% correct. I only have worked here for about a month so I haven't really got into that part of the network. We willingly share info with each other, its just we hasn't gotten to this part.
  • astorrsastorrs Posts: 3,139Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    This book is also great. Edward (you might also know him as Texiwill on the VMware Communities and elsewhere) is always looking at things through a security magnifying glass, and was definitely the right person to write the book. His co-authors Tim and Tom contribute their expertise on a couple chapters as well.

    You might also want to check out the bi-weekly podcast he hosts: Virtualization Security Roundtable - "this podcast provides an open forum to discuss all things related to Virtualization, Virtual Environment, and Cloud Computing Security."
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Thanks for the tip! Any other things you recommend?
  • down77down77 Posts: 1,009Member
    While books are a great source of learning material, also make sure you keep up with someof the industry blogs to stay on top of the changes and learn some potentially undocumented tips and tricks along the way. Here is a great "launch pad" of sites to get you started.

    http://thevpad.com/

    I'm actually using a number of the more reputable blogs as part of my study material for the VCAP (will be required for work).
    CCIE Sec: Starting Nov 11
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    down77 wrote: »
    While books are a great source of learning material, also make sure you keep up with someof the industry blogs to stay on top of the changes and learn some potentially undocumented tips and tricks along the way. Here is a great "launch pad" of sites to get you started.

    vLaunchPad

    I'm actually using a number of the more reputable blogs as part of my study material for the VCAP (will be required for work).

    Very cool. Thanks for the links. Will you be documenting you journey to the VCAP? *hint hint*
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Are these books a pretty good introduction to vSphere? I have an interest in beginning to learn about the technologies but I don't currently work with them.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    xmalachi wrote: »
    Are these books a pretty good introduction to vSphere? I have an interest in beginning to learn about the technologies but I don't currently work with them.

    Well the one books title is Mastering Vsphere so my uneducated guess would be yes. Since I posted this I have talked with my coworker and he said that book is pretty good.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    Well the one books title is Mastering Vsphere so my uneducated guess would be yes. Since I posted this I have talked with my coworker and he said that book is pretty good.

    Appreciate the response. I just asked my Dad about the book and he said without a doubt. It didn't occur to me until after I posted that I had seen this book somewhere before. I guess I'll have to borrow it from him and give it a read.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    xmalachi wrote: »
    Appreciate the response. I just asked my Dad about the book and he said without a doubt. I guess I'll have to borrow it from him and give it a read.

    How much are you going to be working with VMware?
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    How much are you going to be working with VMware?

    I don't work with it at all currently but I would hope to in the future. I'd like to know a little about it though so mostly right now it is just expressing interest in something that I could work with in the future. Virtualization is one of those growing technologies that I think we are all bound to work with. It has been discussed at my current place of employment but I think it is very unlikely that we implement it.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    xmalachi wrote: »
    I don't work with it at all currently but I would hope to in the future. I'd like to know a little about it though so mostly right now it is just expressing interest in something that I could work with in the future. Virtualization is one of those growing technologies that I think we are all bound to work with. It has been discussed at my current place of employment but I think it is very unlikely that we implement it.

    On my weekend job I get to clone machines, work with a few vms, and a little else. I am questioning if I should even bother to put this on my resume. I might just to put it as a keyword. On my weekday job I do less as our other admin takes care of that. I am mostly interested in it from a security aspect and the virtual switching and so on. I might try to position myself to do more in the coming months.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    On my weekend job I get to clone machines, work with a few vms, and a little else. I am questioning if I should even bother to put this on my resume. I might just to put it as a keyword. On my weekday job I do less as our other admin takes care of that. I am mostly interested in it from a security aspect and the virtual switching and so on. I might try to position myself to do more in the coming months.

    I've interviewed for a couple of jobs with the government and I am often asked if I have any experience with virtualization. That is one of the main reasons I want to push and learn more about it. I think that it will be a great booster on any resume because it has become so widespread. I mean nothing that you learn is going to limit your IT career. So just reading these books and learning the material is never going to hurt us. I don't know that I will ever actually go after the VCP but I think that having the knowledge could certainly come in handy.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Well I am now putting up an ESX box at my main job for IDS/IPS (alienvault), MRTG and whatever else I want to put up. This should be good experience.
  • vColevCole Posts: 1,574Member
    knwminus wrote: »
    Well I am now putting up an ESX box at my main job for IDS/IPS (alienvault), MRTG and whatever else I want to put up. This should be good experience.

    Awesome! That's the best way to learn!icon_thumright.gif
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    Yep. I honestly think that I might want to do the VCP in the future. Since virtualization is "the future", having a good understanding of it would be excellent for a wannabe infosec tech. There aren't any partner schools around, maybe I could get my job to pay for it OR I might even out of pocket it, if I think its worth it.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■□□□□□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    Yep. I honestly think that I might want to do the VCP in the future. Since virtualization is "the future", having a good understanding of it would be excellent for a wannabe infosec tech. There aren't any partner schools around, maybe I could get my job to pay for it OR I might even out of pocket it, if I think its worth it.

    Honestly, if there was a community college around me that offered the VCP courses I would do it in a second. The reality for me right now is that I don't have a job that would ever foot the bill for it right now. Maybe I a future employer would be more willing I guess. I also don't ever see myself wanting to foot the bill for it.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    xmalachi wrote: »
    Honestly, if there was a community college around me that offered the VCP courses I would do it in a second. The reality for me right now is that I don't have a job that would ever foot the bill for it right now. Maybe I a future employer would be more willing I guess. I also don't ever see myself wanting to foot the bill for it.

    Before I started working here, they sent the other admin to VMWare training. It would take a lot for them to justify sending me as well. I am going to grab the books mentioned earlier and play with my ESX server.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    So I have about 232 gb in my data store and I am adding a few isos to it, along with VMs and such. I guess this is why people store Isos on local storage and not the San(?). I can see how this would fill out a lot of space very quickly.
  • MentholMooseMentholMoose Senior Member Posts: 1,550Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    knwminus wrote: »
    So I have about 232 gb in my data store and I am adding a few isos to it, along with VMs and such. I guess this is why people store Isos on local storage and not the San(?). I can see how this would fill out a lot of space very quickly.
    A datastore on a SAN or NAS is preferred for ISOs since with a local datastore you could only access the ISOs from that particular host. It's not a problem if you have one host, but with several, dozens, or even hundreds of hosts it would not be practical.
    MentholMoose
    LFCE - MCITP: EDA7, VA, SA, EA - MCSA:S 2003 - CCA (PVS 5, XD 3 / 4 / 5, XS 5 / 6) - VCP 4 / 5
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Posts: 5,031Inactive Imported Users ■■■■■■■■□□
    A datastore on a SAN or NAS is preferred for ISOs since with a local datastore you could only access the ISOs from that particular host. It's not a problem if you have one host, but with several, dozens, or even hundreds of hosts it would not be practical.

    I see. My mistake. Storage Vmotion is also lost when you use to local storage VM.

    I have decided that I must have a VCP. VMware is the s!ht. It is so freaking complicated and mystical. Must. Know. More. It is kinda sad that I won't get to touch it too much here but as I learn hopefully I can develop that skill set.
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