my Technical Support Performance. advice

laptoplaptop Posts: 214Registered Members
The first 2 weeks was basic training.

The 3rd week I was scheduled to pick up calls. So far, I had to keep asking my coworkers for assistance. It's proprietary technology so everything I learned from school or books isn't used much. The thing here is that there are two-three other new employees who started about the same time as me...and it seems like they don't ask for help too often. I'm not sure if they are making BS answers as they go. But, I ask for help almost every other calls because Im afraid to make a mistake using my own decision.

Do you think I should just do the work and let the mistake come? or ask as many questions as possible to minimize problems and learn this way? When you started your first technical support position to handle incoming calls, approx how long were you able to be comfortable with everything?

Thanks

Comments

  • nelnel Posts: 2,859Registered Members
    firstly, there is nothing wrong whatsoever about asking for help. infact, i admire a person who can. guys where i work still dont know the infrastructure inside out and that after 10 years of working here. You'll never be able to know everything.

    if you are working on proprietary software to your industry i would be asking about some kind of development structure - things like training, shadowing people, any knowledge base articles available internally, documentation and so forth. Be proactive and demostrate you are willing to learn. I wouldnt worry too much about the others - just concentrate on your performance. Little things like taking notes about how a problem has been fixed will go noticed, where if your asking about the same issues a million times then they may question why you havent had the ability to either a) learn how to fix it and retain the knowledge or b) are too stupid enough to not make notes on these things :).

    Also, ask the new guys how they are doing, maybe they could help you out when a time comes...you's are a team after all. No doubt they may need your help somewhere along the line! After speaking to them it may be apparent they are struggling too. Its still early doors so dont beat yourself up too much.
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
  • phantasmphantasm Posts: 995Registered Members
    I tell all of the new guys that when they're not asking questions I get worried. The reason being is that no amount of ceritifcations or schooling can help when you're on your first call and troubleshooting it yourself. I work in a NOC for a nationwide ISP, so we have a whole host of hardware and what have you.

    Often times the new people will leave work after the first day looking like a deer lost in the headlights. It's OK, we fully expect our new guys to be there for 6 months before having a clue. So ask questions, don't be the guy who doesn't and F's it all up.

    Myself, as a "senior" tech, I walk around and check on the new guys to make sure they're not doing something wrong and to answer any questions they have.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Posts: 4,212Registered Members
    phantasm wrote: »
    Myself, as a "senior" tech, I walk around and check on the new guys to make sure they're not doing something wrong and to answer any questions they have.

    You as a "senior" tech also probably ask your own share of questions. Even if you already have an idea of the answer and are just looking to bounce some ideas of of other people. Questions are good.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • phantasmphantasm Posts: 995Registered Members
    Devilsbane wrote: »
    You as a "senior" tech also probably ask your own share of questions. Even if you already have an idea of the answer and are just looking to bounce some ideas of of other people. Questions are good.

    I ask a boatload of questions. Mostly directed at the Engineers and Tier II people. However when working with our new people I ask them questions as well to help them think about what they're troubleshooting.

    As for the OP, don't be too hard on yourself. Anything proprietary or new takes time to get comfortable with.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • KikodeKikode Posts: 74Registered Members ■■□□□□□□□□
    My experience on taking calls to troubleshoot is that it's more of a headache then it's worth. I have worked on phone support for two different companies and they both sucked I will never support residential customers again. Once I transitioned into a business help desk it was much better. Because people couldn't play dumb and act like they don't know how to use a mouse. Really I didn't mind the work and learned alot but the reason phone support jobs have me jaded is the terrible work conditions and lousy pay. I now work hands on with the technology I love and learn so much more working hands on. I hope this doesn't sound demeaning about your Job but it frustrates me to see these support centers take advantage of educated people. Then again if you are new at IT support then I say learn as much as you can and ask as many questions as you can. Then once you've put in some time move to greener pastures.
  • rogue2shadowrogue2shadow Posts: 1,501Registered Members
    There was a great quote I once heard from a friend of an old boss: "For the first 6 months, you're supposed to be annoying, for the first year, you should be learning, after that you should be proficient"

    In essence, its okay to ask questions for as long as you need to become proficient. Its better to double check than to just "get the job done". In the long run, its only helping you because you are actually going through the issue raise/mitigation scenarios in a thorough manner and they will see it.

Sign In or Register to comment.