Need some direction here

2URGSE2URGSE Member Posts: 220 ■■■□□□□□□□
Here is the deal. I'm currently studying for my Cisco CCNA exam. I am interested in networking, but as time goes by I realize that I'm more interested in defeating malware and data recovery.

With that being said, I want to complete my CCNA, since I scored 66% and felt I was really close, so it would be a waste to stop now.

I started researching the CEH path and found the Official exam book.

I also have other books on the shelf such as Hacking Exposed 3rd edition, Hacking Exposed for Wireless, Hacking Exposed Cisco Systems and a few other books about network security and social engineering.

I've done work removing malware in a Corporate environment as well as Data Recovery.

I have my A+ and Network+ and wondering if I should seriously consider the CEH track since that's what I'm into and what kind of jobs I can land.


Thanks,
A+
Network+
CCENT (formally CCNA certified)
ICE (Imprivata Certified Engineer)

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    The CEH has very little to do with malware and data recovery, and the books you listed don't really either. What is it you ultimately want to be doing? What kind of programming skills do you have?
  • 2URGSE2URGSE Member Posts: 220 ■■■□□□□□□□
    dynamik wrote: »
    The CEH has very little to do with malware and data recovery, and the books you listed don't really either. What is it you ultimately want to be doing? What kind of programming skills do you have?

    I don't have much programming experience. I'm trying to get some free online training on a malware removal forum.

    I have experience with most Anti-Virus products, favorite one is Kaspersky. I'm on their forum and they have a unique way of removing malware using AVZ for logging, GSI logging and then Malwarebytes.

    I also have experience using GetDataBack and Active Disk Killer.

    I've set up a little computer lab in my garage (See my post in the CCNA section) and I'm toying around with LCD, John the Ripper and some port scanning.

    I want to do something in security, I'm interesting in ethical hacking since I like to solve problems.

    I like helping people remove malware and also retrieve their data if their system crashed.

    I'm currently reading the Hacking Exposed about Cisco Systems, pretty interesting book.

    I guess you can say I'm interested in any combination of the above.
    A+
    Network+
    CCENT (formally CCNA certified)
    ICE (Imprivata Certified Engineer)
  • TrainingDazeTrainingDaze Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    why not first getting your feet wet in security and go for the CompTIA trilogy by earning the Security+? (especially since the "lifetime certification" window is about to close)
  • 2URGSE2URGSE Member Posts: 220 ■■■□□□□□□□
    why not first getting your feet wet in security and go for the CompTIA trilogy by earning the Security+? (especially since the "lifetime certification" window is about to close)

    I started reading about it, but got distracted with the Cisco and the fact I didn't pass.

    Gosh sometimes my mind is all over the place.
    A+
    Network+
    CCENT (formally CCNA certified)
    ICE (Imprivata Certified Engineer)
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    What you're describing sounds like technician-level work. There's nothing wrong with that, but if you really want to really delve into malware, you're going to need an in-depth knowledge of operating systems, networking, and programming (including assembly). I think the CCNA and Security+ are good, general certifications you can work towards while you figure out what path you want to follow.
  • TrainingDazeTrainingDaze Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    My .02 cents would be to focus your efforts and close the deal with the CCNA first. You're close now and it's best to finish this before starting a new (or several new) endeavor(s).

    In the meantime, if you want to actually work in security then it would be wise to go to job boards (indeed, dice, monster) and see what positions are most interesting to you and what corresponding experience/education/certs are required.

    If you are not looking to launch a career in security but are just intrigued by various aspects of it, then by all means keep learning and reading books, blogs, and boards.

    At this point, the best advice would be to set short term (< 6 months), medium term ( <2 yrs) and long term ( 5+ yrs) goals for yourself so you really focus on where you are at now and what you need to specifically do to be where you want to be. Don't let yourself feel overwhelmed and good luck on your studies. icon_study.gif
  • TrainingDazeTrainingDaze Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    dynamik, could you recommend a favorite book for really establishing a strong base in tcp/ip?
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586 ■■■■□□□□□□
    dynamik, could you recommend a favorite book for really establishing a strong base in tcp/ip?

    I think most people have Amazon.com: The TCP/IP Guide: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Internet Protocols Reference (0689145704709): Charles M. Kozierok: Books as there favorite book around here on the subject.


    I also found this helpful: http://www.sans.org/security-resources/tcpip.pdf?ref=3871
  • TrainingDazeTrainingDaze Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    thanks wasted for sharing, very helpful :D
  • 2URGSE2URGSE Member Posts: 220 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I got the official exam book.

    Very very interesting I must say. I'm already at chapter 4.

    I do see some things that are on the CCNA like the TCP 3 hand shake, so some things are already known to me.
    A+
    Network+
    CCENT (formally CCNA certified)
    ICE (Imprivata Certified Engineer)
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Member Posts: 658 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Unless you have foundational knowledge, Malware analysis is way way out of reach. GIAC states that Malware is an Advanced Certification of knowledge as does Carnegie Mellon CERT. To get to that level you need to understand both IT and engineering at a software level. Until you have done that you have no chance of understanding Malware.

    I am not saying this to be mean but just letting you know you need to get your foundation straight before hitting your goals. The good thing is that people in this forum are willing to help you get there. Cheers.
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,547 Admin
    I just noticed that this thread does not mention the SANS GREM (GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware) certification. Anyone looking into specializing in reverse engineering Malware should be aware of it.

    GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware (GREM)
    GREM Certification Bulletin
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