Pinging the TFTP Server

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  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    Simfish wrote: »
    Configured to duplex full on each of the routers. Still no cigar (when I tried to ping the PC from the router, one time with the router connected directly to the PC via ethernet, and the other time with the switch connected to the PC via ethernet).

    You will need a x-over cable to connect the PC directly to a router, but you probably already know that. :)

    If you can console into the switch, and ping the routers from there, then the connection between the switch and the routers is ok. Lets for a moment completely remove the routers from the picture, because we know they work fine.

    Lets just concentrate on the ethernet connection from your PC to the switch. It looks like the problem is in this area.
    tiersten wrote: »
    Yes. Getting a reply to pinging the loopback interface doesn't indicate anything about any other interface in your machine. The other interfaces may be working or they may not be working. You can't determine it via the loopback interface.

    So the issue could be either the ethernet cable or your NIC, as the switchports seem fine if you can ping the routers through the switch.

    Can you try another known working straigh-through cable to go between your PC and the switch? Can you try another PC?
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    wbosher wrote: »
    127.0.0.1 is the loop back address, it's reserved for testing purposes.

    If you are having problems with your network, PING 127.0.0.1 proves the network card and the TCP/IP software is working correctly. You will get a response from 127.0.0.1 even if your computer isn't connected to anything.

    So it seems that the PC is ok.

    If the routers can connect to the switch, then the switchports are ok. Have you tried using one of the same working switchports that the routers are using? Just to completely rule out a dodgy switchport.

    If the switchports are ok (confirmed as above), that only leaves the cable or a sloppy or loose connection.

    Yep, tried using the same working switchports. Even tried the ethernet cables that I knew for sure, worked.

    I'm thinking about trying to work my setup onto the desktop that's sitting right next to me, as opposed to this laptop. Does anyone think that might be redundant though? Still trying to pinpoint the source of the problem...
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    Simfish wrote: »
    Yep, tried using the same working switchports. Even tried the ethernet cables that I knew for sure, worked.

    I'm thinking about trying to work my setup onto the desktop that's sitting right next to me, as opposed to this laptop. Does anyone think that might be redundant though? Still trying to pinpoint the source of the problem...

    See my post above.

    Looks like we're typing at the same time. icon_lol.gif
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    wbosher wrote: »
    Can you try another known working straigh-through cable to go between your PC and the switch?

    Tried that. I'll see if working with the desktop (different computer) works though.

    Possibly unrelated, but I also have a Linksys router (not part of my lab setup) that's giving internet connection throughout my home...any use for that here? Because if the PC connection to the switch occupies the ethernet cable slot, then you can't really get Internet unless you have WiFi (or you connect the modem to something...), right?
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    Simfish wrote: »
    Tried that. I'll see if working with the desktop (different computer) works though.

    Possibly unrelated, but I also have a Linksys router (not part of my lab setup) that's giving internet connection throughout my home...any use for that here? Because if the PC connection to the switch occupies the ethernet cable slot, then you can't really get Internet unless you have WiFi (or you connect the modem to something...), right?

    Don't worry about that at the moment, one problem at a time.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Simfish wrote: »
    Going to address this first, then try the other solutions suggested.

    IP Addresses are 192.168.1.57 on Router A, 192.168.1.54 on Router B, and 192.168.1.52 on Router C (all these routers are connected to the switch). Subnet mask on each of the routers is 255.255.255.0

    And yeah, I can ping each of the routers while consoled into the switch.

    Going back to post 15 on page 1:
    1. IP: 192.168.1.51
    Subnet: 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.1 (also indicated by some hexadecimal address)

    None of your routers, nor the switch is 192.168.1.1.
  • chmorinchmorin Posts: 1,446Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    You seem to have all of your routers configured with interfaces within the same subnet. (Which is bad).

    Please draw us up a physical and logical representation of the network you are configuring. Include cable types, IP Addresses, and interfaces.

    Networking is a precise thing. We are having to fish out the information from you and when you are still receiving errors we would like a way to confirm what you are actually working with.

    You can scan a piece of paper for all we care, we just need an accurate representation of what you are currently working with to help. Much of what has been brought up in this topic is network fundamentals related, and when that is the problem it makes fixing the actual problem difficult.
    Currently Pursuing
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  • miller811miller811 Posts: 897Member
    chmorin wrote: »
    You seem to have all of your routers configured with interfaces within the same subnet. (Which is bad).

    Please draw us up a physical and logical representation of the network you are configuring. Include cable types, IP Addresses, and interfaces.

    Networking is a precise thing. We are having to fish out the information from you and when you are still receiving errors we would like a way to confirm what you are actually working with.

    You can scan a piece of paper for all we care, we just need an accurate representation of what you are currently working with to help. Much of what has been brought up in this topic is network fundamentals related, and when that is the problem it makes fixing the actual problem difficult.

    Basically all he is trying to do it TFTP an IOS from a router to his PC or PC to router....

    Step one be able to ping A PC from A router....

    Nothing can be accomplished until that is completed.

    Everything else is secondary.... other routers, switches, etc...

    This is not rocket science.
    I don't claim to be an expert, but I sure would like to become one someday.

    Quest for 11K pages read in 2011
    Page Count total to date - 1283
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    Going back to post 15 on page 1:



    None of your routers, nor the switch is 192.168.1.1.

    Ah, I see. Seems like we might be getting warm. How should I remedy this scenario? Make the switch or one of the routers have an IP or 192.168.1.1? Does it have to be any router in particular (namely, the default gateway router as indicated by the switch)?

    Thanks!
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    wbosher wrote: »
    You will need a x-over cable to connect the PC directly to a router

    No you don't.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Simfish wrote: »
    Ah, I see. Seems like we might be getting warm. How should I remedy this scenario? Make the switch or one of the routers have an IP or 192.168.1.1? Does it have to be any router in particular (namely, the default gateway router as indicated by the switch)?

    Thanks!

    One of two ways:

    1. Change one of the routers to 192.168.1.1
    2. Change your pc's default gateway to one of the routers ip's (.52, .54, .57)
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    phoeneous wrote: »
    No you don't.

    icon_scratch.gifEverything I've read or heard says otherwise, maybe with the exception of a L3 switch.
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    phoeneous wrote: »
    No you don't.
    Yes you do..... unless you're connecting to a port on a router's expensive switch module that supports Auto-MDIX.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    miller811 wrote: »
    This is not rocket science.
    Agreed icon_lol.gif
    Simfish wrote: »
    MacBook Pro, but with Windows 7
    Has the Ethernet port on this worked with anything else before? Did you ever have it plugged into your Linksys and did it work then? Or have you only used that MacBook wireless?
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    mikej412 wrote: »
    Yes you do..... unless you're connecting to a port on a router's expensive switch module that supports Auto-MDIX.

    Which I do. This whole time I thought it was any router ethernet interface....
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    One of two ways:

    1. Change one of the routers to 192.168.1.1

    Just did this...still no cigar. Anyone else all for me trying to work my setup onto the other computer? Or, any other ideas to troubleshoot?

    Thanks for all the help so far! :D

    Just to check: The PumpKIN program (as well as HyperTerminal of course) should be running in the background in order for the connection between the PC and the switch/router to work? Regardless...I can never seem to get this ping to work.
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    mikej412 wrote: »
    Agreed icon_lol.gif


    Has the Ethernet port on this worked with anything else before? Did you ever have it plugged into your Linksys and did it work then? Or have you only used that MacBook wireless?

    Yeah, funny thing, there was a quite a stretch of time when my wireless wasn't configured, so I had to connect the Ethernet port directly to the Linksys router...and it serviced the Internet well. So I'm not sure what could be the problem with connecting to my lab setup and pinging...
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    Simfish wrote: »
    Just did this...still no cigar. Anyone else all for me trying to work my setup onto the other computer? Or, any other ideas to troubleshoot?

    Thanks for all the help so far! :D

    Just to check: The PumpKIN program (as well as HyperTerminal of course) should be running in the background in order for the connection between the PC and the switch/router to work? Regardless...I can never seem to get this ping to work.

    Me personally, I would try another PC. It seems to me that this is where the problem lies as you can't ping either the router or the switch. In fact you can't even get a light up on the switch!

    You should just be able to ping using a command prompt in Windows, no need for HyperTerminal just to ping a remote switch/router.
  • chmorinchmorin Posts: 1,446Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    miller811 wrote: »
    Basically all he is trying to do it TFTP an IOS from a router to his PC or PC to router....

    Step one be able to ping A PC from A router....

    Nothing can be accomplished until that is completed.

    Everything else is secondary.... other routers, switches, etc...

    This is not rocket science.

    Fair enough. The thing is obviously something in his environment is working if he has routers pinging each other. If we knew the environment it could only help us troubleshoot the issue and make suggestions.

    It is never a bad thing to want to see the whole picture.

    That being said, I will agree that this is a (supposedly) simple task. So we are going to practically have to draw out a how-to now instead of helping him troubleshoot.

    Step 1: Connect the two devices via cross over cable:
    sp3220100930220318.gif

    Step 2: Configure TFTP server with IP Address and Subnet mask, Gateway is not needed with a point to point connection with no need to transfer out of the subnet. (If you want a gateway, go ahead and make it 192.168.1.1 in this case).
    sp3220100930220454.gif

    Step 3: Assign the fast Ethernet interface on the router the ip address of 192.168.1.1 and apply the no shut command:
    Router>ena
    Router#conf t
    Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
    Router(config)#int fa0/0
    Router(config-if)#ip add
    Router(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
    Router(config-if)#no shut
    
    %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed state to up
    %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed state to up
    Router(config-if)#^Z
    Router#
    %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console
    Router#ping 192.168.1.101
    
    Type escape sequence to abort.
    Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.101, timeout is 2 seconds:
    .!!!!
    Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 5/5/5 ms
    
    Router#
    

    It should be able to ping after the ARP table catches up (the one missed ping).


    Troubleshooting Tips:

    1) Physical Connectivity. Do you have link lights? Are you using a cross-over cable? Are your interfaces up/up (see code).
    Router#show ip int brief
    Interface              IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol
     
    FastEthernet0/0        192.168.1.1     YES manual up                    up
     
    FastEthernet0/1        unassigned      YES manual administratively down down
     
    Vlan1                  unassigned      YES manual administratively down down
    Router#
    

    2) Logical connectivity. Are your IP Addresses correct? Can each node ping its own interface? Is the interface no-shut?

    If you have an idea, isolate the proposed problem and remove it. If it works, you win. If not, try again.
    EX: No link lights: Confirm interface is no-shut.
    EX: No link lights: Remove and change the cable.
    EX: Still no link lights? Use a different PC/NIC.
    EX: Still no link lights? Use a different router/interface.

    Hope this helps.
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    mikej412 wrote:
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  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    chmorin wrote: »
    EX: Still no link lights? Use a different PC/NIC.

    Really excited to post this. I setup the TFTP server and configured a static IP address and subnet on a different PC, and then had the ethernet cable hooked up to there from the switch (still did the HyperTerminal configurations on my laptop though, since HyperTerminal isn't working on that PC for whatever reason).

    First immediate difference that I noticed when I turned on my lab setup was that the switch light corresponding to the slot of the ethernet cable connected to my PC was turned on. Ran the ping, followed through the TFTP commands, and I was able to transfer files successfully.

    A little bit of rough edges to deal with here and there (such as requiring two computers to do these operations), but nothing that a little workaround can't handle! Awesome.

    Now...I'm currently running IOS IP 12.2(7b) on these routers. Think this should be sufficient for my CCNA prep, or anyone else have any suggestions on perhaps better IOS's out there?

    Thanks again everyone for all the help! Problem solved! :D
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Simfish wrote: »
    A little bit of rough edges to deal with here and there (such as requiring two computers to do these operations), but nothing that a little workaround can't handle! Awesome.

    But you don't need two pc's do what you are trying to do, you only need one.
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    But you don't need two pc's do what you are trying to do, you only need one.

    I realize that. But sometimes, ya just can't explain why programs don't want to work like they're supposed to on a computer :D
  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Member
    Simfish wrote: »
    I realize that. But sometimes, ya just can't explain why programs don't want to work like they're supposed to on a computer :D
    That isn't the attitude to take especially when you're trying to learn something as you won't learn the correct way to do something. No point learning a workaround when it should be working in the first place. You need to find out why it isn't working, how to fix it and how to prevent it going wrong in the future.
  • chmorinchmorin Posts: 1,446Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    tiersten wrote: »
    That isn't the attitude to take especially when you're trying to learn something as you won't learn the correct way to do something. No point learning a workaround when it should be working in the first place. You need to find out why it isn't working, how to fix it and how to prevent it going wrong in the future.

    Agreed. A workaround is only a temporary fix.
    Currently Pursuing
    WGU (BS in IT Network Administration) - 52%| CCIE:Voice Written - 0% (0/200 Hours)
    mikej412 wrote:
    Cisco Networking isn't just a job, it's a Lifestyle.
  • SimfishSimfish Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    tiersten wrote: »
    That isn't the attitude to take especially when you're trying to learn something as you won't learn the correct way to do something. No point learning a workaround when it should be working in the first place. You need to find out why it isn't working, how to fix it and how to prevent it going wrong in the future.

    I think I can justify this by saying that the solution is beyond the scope of my current knowledge, and that I'm convinced that I'll eventually find something the further along I go in my studying. I haven't tried any other terminal emulation programs, but that seems to be the solution from threads about this problem. I figured, I wanted to do most of my configuring anyways on the laptop, so this is not that bad.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Simfish wrote: »
    I realize that. But sometimes, ya just can't explain why programs don't want to work like they're supposed to on a computer :D

    I completely disagree and that's a terrible mentality to have. There is always a logical explaination to a problem, it's not like were conducting studies on the mating habits of african swallows, this is simple networking.
  • NetwurkNetwurk Posts: 1,155Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    On the odd chance that anyone looking at this thread is interested in setting up a TFTP server, here's a free one:

    TFTP, Free TFTP Server, TFTP Server: Free Network Monitoring Tools | SolarWinds

    Works on a PC or a server.

    Pinging one is a simple task, the only complication would be how strict most PC firewalls are by default. Start by turning off the firewall, disconnect from the internet first if you have concerns. Try to ping. If it works with the firewall off, you know where the problem is.

    Knowing cabling basics will help you rule out a physical layer problem. Keep some known good cables handy so that you can rule out patch/crossover cable issues.

    You can eliminate the need to keep known good cables handy if you have a cable tester. It's a cool lab accessory, here's a pic of one

    make-homemade-network-cable-tester-120X120.jpg

    Mine is an old one that doesn't have an extra tester for long distance. It works at home for my lab, but if you get one for on the job make sure you have the modern two device unit.

    And make sure the company pays for it if at all possible.

    :)
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