What Certification should I get?

crazychrono100crazychrono100 Member Posts: 30 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi guys,

I've been working as a desktop support for almost a year now. I currently have no certification right now so I'm thinking of getting some to solidify my resume for future jobs. Which certs should I look to get?

Comments

  • Sounds GoodSounds Good Member Posts: 403
    A+ should suit you well
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  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    Hi guys,

    I've been working as a desktop support for almost a year now. I currently have no certification right now so I'm thinking of getting some to solidify my resume for future jobs. Which certs should I look to get?

    It all depends on what you want to do. While the usual recommendation (A+, Net+ & Sec+) would suit you well (and provide a good baseline), you have to decide what you want to do an where you want to go with your career.

    If you like systems then look into the MCITP:EA or SA. If you want networking then get some networking experience and work towards a CCNA.

    But in the end it all comes back to you, how much time are you willing to sacrifice for studying outside of work and what you want to do.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Depends on your environment and your experiences.
  • it_consultantit_consultant Member Posts: 1,903
    If you have already been doing help desk for a year, I would skip the CompTIA path and decide whether you want to invest time in Cisco or Microsoft and start on one of those paths. I think the client MS exam plus the PRO enterprise support (or whatever they are calling it now) is a good place to start.
  • crazychrono100crazychrono100 Member Posts: 30 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I like your what you suggest it_consultant. I don't think i would want to spend time and money getting the A+ cert since that wouldn't really help further my career. However, the network+ is intriguing to me. Having some network knowledge would definitely help no matter where I end up in my career. But yeah i think I would definitely look to study for the Microsoft certs. Those seem a little more advance certs and pretty popular requirement for job listings that i've seen.
  • ssampierssampier Member Posts: 224
    I think one member of this forums suggests you have the A+ and Network+ knowledge but not actually shell out the cash for the tests. I think it's a solid plan since those tests underpin both Microsoft and Cisco tests (less A+ for Cisco, however).

    I am actually surprised how often people assume you need A+ and Network+. I was just asked today if I had any certifications. I rattled off my certs (see sidebar).

    He indicated CCNA is a good way to go and Network+, too. I was thinking, "What???"
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  • it_consultantit_consultant Member Posts: 1,903
    Network+ gets a bad rap because it sounds similar to A+. I haven't taken the test but I have seen the study materials, a lot of it is very good information and relate well to the networks I have worked on. I recommend skipping the A+ but simply studying for Net+ is not a bad idea. Its the only study material I have seen, other than Cisco, that can explain IPv4 in a logical and correct fashion.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Certifications should reflect two things:
    * Your experience
    * The direction you want to move your career

    Since you are talking about solidifying your resume I suggest you begin with the certifications that will demonstrate your experience. IT_Consultant's suggestionof Net+ is great. I would argue that the following would be very good for you"

    MCITP Enterprise Desktop Support Tech 7
    MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator 7

    Three exams to get you the two certs above. They will clearly keep you in a support type of role.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Network+ gets a bad rap because it sounds similar to A+. I haven't taken the test but I have seen the study materials, a lot of it is very good information and relate well to the networks I have worked on. I recommend skipping the A+ but simply studying for Net+ is not a bad idea. Its the only study material I have seen, other than Cisco, that can explain IPv4 in a logical and correct fashion.


    It is teaching me a whole lot. Infact I am going to sit for this exam before the end of the year and enroll in a CCNA program at the community college.
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Member Posts: 2,077 ■■■■■■□□□□
    So describe your desktop support experience? Image management? App support?

    Anyhow most people now days will start with something like MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician is a good start. CCENT would also be a good move. I would avoid Comptia based on my experience.
    -Daniel
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Daniel333 wrote: »
    So describe your desktop support experience? Image management? App support?

    Anyhow most people now days will start with something like MCITP: Enterprise Support Technician is a good start. CCENT would also be a good move. I would avoid Comptia based on my experience.
    One of my buddies is about to take the CCENT soon (NerdyDad on TE) he says CCENT is Net+ with a Cisco slant. Any of you guys with CCENT agree? I'm thinking about taking just as a way to brush up on my networking skills. (Sorry to hijack)
  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Member Posts: 1,649 ■■■■■■■■□□
    One of my buddies is about to take the CCENT soon (NerdyDad on TE) he says CCENT is Net+ with a Cisco slant. Any of you guys with CCENT agree? I'm thinking about taking just as a way to brush up on my networking skills. (Sorry to hijack)

    That would be my take, but I did the one exam CCNA. When I originally started to study for it, I took the Network+ as a gauge...
    AZ-204 [ ] AZ-400 [X] AZ-500
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  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Member Posts: 1,649 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Certifications should reflect two things:
    * Your experience
    * The direction you want to move your career

    Since you are talking about solidifying your resume I suggest you begin with the certifications that will demonstrate your experience. IT_Consultant's suggestionof Net+ is great. I would argue that the following would be very good for you"

    MCITP Enterprise Desktop Support Tech 7
    MCITP Enterprise Desktop Administrator 7

    Three exams to get you the two certs above. They will clearly keep you in a support type of role.

    You will at least have the client side done towards the MCITP Enterprise Administrator with that. Once you get those done, you could start working towards MCITP Server Administrator as a path you want to move your career, and then once you have some experience under your belt you could knock out the rest of the EA, which would only be two exams at that point.
    AZ-204 [ ] AZ-400 [X] AZ-500
    2020 Goals: Azure Developer Associate, Azure DevOps Expert, Azure Security Associate
  • NorbieNorbie Member Posts: 105
    One of my buddies is about to take the CCENT soon (NerdyDad on TE) he says CCENT is Net+ with a Cisco slant. Any of you guys with CCENT agree? I'm thinking about taking just as a way to brush up on my networking skills. (Sorry to hijack)

    I would say the CCENT is Network+ on steroids. I think the Network+ is a fairly simple test and would be for anyone after a limited amount of studying...CCENT was a lot harder to me at least.

    I think Network+ is a lot of information but the ccna stuff is putting that information to work (and a lot more than that).
    "Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm." - Winston Churchill
  • snokerpokersnokerpoker Member Posts: 661 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A+, Network +, and throw in a client OS exam from M$ depending on what your shop uses. That would be a nice trio of certs for any Desktop Support Tech.
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