Which Office is predominant? 2003 or 2007?

binarysoulbinarysoul Member Posts: 993
Hey guys,

I'm just wondering if you've across many companies that have Office 2007 (I haven't).

I understand the new interface for Office 2007 is such a turn off (I can see end users pulling their hair upon seeing Office 2007). But again, it's possible some companies upgraded.

p.s. there are products that allow you to have old interface for office 2007.

Comments

  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber Member Posts: 1,480 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Most of our Office licenses are 2003, our tech trainers wanted nothing to do with 2007 or 2010 to have to train people on that as well. And on the other hand of things, unless you're in an Exchange environment or use any of MS's collaboration software (we're no to both) then what does one really gain much from a later version of Office?
  • tierstentiersten Member Posts: 4,505
    2003 at work for me. I've got Office 2010 at home and I've actually gotten used to the ribbon interface.
  • Repo ManRepo Man Member Posts: 300
    Mostly 2003 where I work except users in Finance who need Excel 2007 due to row limitations.
  • mark_s0mark_s0 Member Posts: 82 ■■■□□□□□□□
    We're mostly an Office 2007 shop. Mainly because more and more people are asking to be upgraded to it. It's got to the point now where any images that are rolled out, it will have Office 2007.
    Office 2003 will only be installed alongside Office 2007 when requested.

    At first people were a bit anxious about trying it due to the ribbon interface but give them a week or so and they were fine.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Member Posts: 2,333 ■■■■■■■□□□
    mark_s0 wrote: »
    At first people were a bit anxious about trying it due to the ribbon interface but give them a week or so and they were fine.

    Likewise at my work. It's actually made them more productive because you can see everything on the ribbon bar. People just dont like change.
  • PsoasmanPsoasman Senior Member Member Posts: 2,687 ■■■■■■■■■□
    2003 for now. I actually like 2007 better now that I have played around with it. Once you get used to it, the ribbon is pretty intuitive. It also helped that part of my degree required some courses in office 2007.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Office 2007 has been in our environment for over a year now. You have to special request 2003 inorder to get it on your machine, which requires a business reason. Some of our older legacy systems binary files interface with 2003, with 2007 you need a plug / interface to get it to read these certain file types. They might be ASCII I am not 100% certain.
  • it_consultantit_consultant Member Posts: 1,903
    We are almost entirely Office 2007 across my client base. We had to upgrade 6 users to Outlook 2010 because that is the only version of outlook that supports two native exchange accounts in the same profile. We have a terminal server which has Office 2010 standard, I imagine as more people use that (I am trying to get people off of client VPNs) they will start asking for an upgrade.
  • chmorinchmorin Member Posts: 1,446 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Office 2007 here.

    Now Access... thats another story >.>
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  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I still think 2003 is the most widely used. Where I work, they are in progress of testing 2010 for rollout, we skipped over 2007.

    Like Psoasman I think I prefer 2007, but I am not opposed to 2003. I haven't used 2010 much, but from what I see they did another large makeover to further confuse the mass public. I am extremely worried about how many phone calls we will be getting when 2010 hits.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher A cornfield in OhioMember Posts: 4,299 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Devilsbane wrote: »
    I still think 2003 is the most widely used. Where I work, they are in progress of testing 2010 for rollout, we skipped over 2007.

    Like Psoasman I think I prefer 2007, but I am not opposed to 2003. I haven't used 2010 much, but from what I see they did another large makeover to further confuse the mass public. I am extremely worried about how many phone calls we will be getting when 2010 hits.

    2007 to 2010 is mostly cosmetic (color and shading). The only big difference is the inclusion of a file tab, which takes the place of the orb. Users transitioning to 2010 from 2007 should have only minor questions. The improvements to the print preview interface alone should make end users happy, IMO.

    Have you guys seen these?
    Interactive: Word 2003 to Word 2007 command reference guide - Word - Microsoft Office

    Interactive: Word 2003 to Word 2007 command reference guide - Word - Microsoft Office
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    2007 to 2010 is mostly cosmetic (color and shading). The only big difference is the inclusion of a file tab, which takes the place of the orb. Users transitioning to 2010 from 2007 should have only minor questions. The improvements to the print preview interface alone should make end users happy, IMO.

    Have you guys seen these?
    Interactive: Word 2003 to Word 2007 command reference guide - Word - Microsoft Office

    Interactive: Word 2003 to Word 2007 command reference guide - Word - Microsoft Office

    Thats good for me since I am familiar with 2007, but the company is going from 2003. We get a couple calls a day of how to do things (which I don't think we technically support, but for something small its easier just to do it than say no). We are either going to have to send the whole company to training or hire extra people to work on the help desk taking their calls about how to use spell check or something ridicuously easy like that.

    I've seen the 2003-2007, but not the 2007-2010. Thanks for the link.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher A cornfield in OhioMember Posts: 4,299 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Even that might be helpful for people going from 2003 t0 2010.
  • MentholMooseMentholMoose Senior Member Member Posts: 1,524 ■■■■■■■■□□
    phoeneous wrote: »
    People just dont like change.
    Correction: people don't like change for change's sake. Seriously, is there any downside whatsoever to letting people use the old menu system if they want?
    MentholMoose
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  • jojopramosjojopramos Member Posts: 415
    Our company is using Office 2007 already and the IT group is using Office 2010. User's have no complain so far...
  • RomBUSRomBUS Member Posts: 699 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I used 2003 for the longest time at home...from release till this summer when I got a new laptop...I am now using 2007.. its actually not bad because Ive used it at work and fiddled around with it before actually owning it. I now dont have to worry about having the new "x" extensions for files.

    I use Office 2007 at work though some users 2k10
  • it_consultantit_consultant Member Posts: 1,903
    You would be surprised how few people complain when they get Office 2007 / 2010. The ribbon interface takes about ten seconds to get used too, after that there is no way they will go back to 2003. My users collective IQ is in the medium to low range so if they can figure it out, anyone can.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher A cornfield in OhioMember Posts: 4,299 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Correction: people don't like change for change's sake. Seriously, is there any downside whatsoever to letting people use the old menu system if they want?
    Yes.
    1. The GUI used in 2007/2010 is the result of decades of research into how people actually use computer applications and will increase productivity if the users get just a little bit of retraining. The controls are better organized and more naturally positioned.

    2. It would be counter productive and cost prohibitive to include two GUI systems in the Office suite.

    If you read a book on design like the Design of Everyday Things you'll see very clearly how the Ribbon conforms much better to the concepts discussed in that book. The problem is most users have a decade or more experience with the old interface and are used to it's poorer layout.
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