Apple Certified Support Professional (ACSP)

badboyeeebadboyeee Posts: 348Registered Members
I tried to get a Network Tech job at a school district but got blind sided by the amount of Mac based systems that they work with. I have all Windows based experience and have my A+/Network+ certs but the Mac part really killed my qualification.

I would like to be able to combat that requirement the next time an open job position at a school district comes up.

Would being a ACSP be a good solution? It requires only to take the Mac OS X Support Essentials v10.6 (Prometric exam: #9L0-403) exam.

Unfortunately I don't own a Mac and can't afford one at this moment.

How would I prepare for this exam? And/or how different would it be compared to taking the CompTIA certs?
2011 Certification Plans so far:
[Cisco: CCENT (ICND1)-> CCNA (ICND2)]
[MS: MCP-> MCDST-> MCTS / MCITP:ESDT7-> MCITP:EDA7]

Class taking:
[Cisco NetAcademy - Network Fundamentals (35%)]

Video currently watching:

[CBT Nuggets - CCENT w/ Jeremy (50%)]
[CBT Nuggets - 20-721 (40%)

Comments

  • /pub/beer//pub/beer/ Posts: 66Registered Members ■■□□□□□□□□
    I would try for the ACTC as well (after the ACSP). It will get more into the "server" level of administration. Look into things like ARD (Apple Remote Desktop), imaging, and maybe even something like Casper Suite from Jamf Software. Those would be things that a school district (or a company with large implementation of Macs) would like.

    You really need a Mac tho. You might be able to find an ISO for OSX 10.6 (or buy it cheap at the apple store). $29 for 10.6 in store.

    Then try to put together a hackintosh, or use virtual box, or try to find a cheap INTEL based mac mini on CL or something.

    I used to support mac's back 10 years ago and hated it. OS 9, crappy hardware, just awful to support. I got back into it 3 years ago when 10.5 was a huge jump over XP, since then I've been focusing much more on my linux knowledge. Linux, Unix, OS X are all very similar and the backend in OS X is very useful.

    As far as the exams and studying - get the peachpit books and follow along on a system. The exams are the same multiple choice setups as many other exams.
    Certification Goal:
    - ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • NinjaBoyNinjaBoy Posts: 968Registered Members
    Why not try the Apple Certified Associate - Mac Integration 10.6 exam first of all? I'm starting down the Apple route as we've got a few mac's in our Media Department, and I found this exam to be a nice ease into the supporting side, especially when integrating them into an AD environment.

    Now that I've passed it, I'm looking forward to the ACSP exam in the new year :)

    -Ken
  • /pub/beer//pub/beer/ Posts: 66Registered Members ■■□□□□□□□□
    NinjaBoy wrote: »
    Why not try the Apple Certified Associate - Mac Integration 10.6 exam first of all? I'm starting down the Apple route as we've got a few mac's in our Media Department, and I found this exam to be a nice ease into the supporting side, especially when integrating them into an AD environment.

    Now that I've passed it, I'm looking forward to the ACSP exam in the new year :)

    -Ken

    I've not even heard of that entry level exam. I got into the Apple certs earlier this year just as they transitioned to 10.6, I figured it was a good time to start. I wouldn't say that the exams were overall difficult. As stated before, it helps get your foot in the door for some Linux/Unix experience as well.
    Certification Goal:
    - ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • badboyeeebadboyeee Posts: 348Registered Members
    Thank you both for your replies. I will certainly look into this.

    I actually had an interview with a school yesterday. I was ready to answer any questions regarding Macs but to my surprise this school was trying to move away from Macs and be strictly PC.

    The interview went well, but if I don't get this job, it's probably because of my lack of experience working with students/children...

    I am currently pursuing my Security+ by year end and also keeping an eye out for another job. Not sure what my next cert should be afterward, I wanted to get my feet wet in MS, CCENT, and/or Apple for next year. Or should I try for a CompTIA Linux+ cert?
    2011 Certification Plans so far:
    [Cisco: CCENT (ICND1)-> CCNA (ICND2)]
    [MS: MCP-> MCDST-> MCTS / MCITP:ESDT7-> MCITP:EDA7]

    Class taking:
    [Cisco NetAcademy - Network Fundamentals (35%)]

    Video currently watching:

    [CBT Nuggets - CCENT w/ Jeremy (50%)]
    [CBT Nuggets - 20-721 (40%)
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Posts: 2,070Registered Members
    I completed the training for that cert under 10.5 and 10.6. ITS EASY. But sadly, nothing relating to Apple is cheap or free. Sorry man. You can float the equipment on your credit card?

    There is a book on ebay you can get for pennies. MacOS Support Essentials 10.5 or 10.6 they are almost identical, has everything you need to know and more. There is a free 4 hour training on Apple's site, dig around. Something like Intgrating Macintosh in Windows enviorments.

    In order to complete it though you need a couple things

    One Windows 2003 server configured as a DC
    One Windows XP Based Comp, dual boot ubuntu is also helpful
    Cheap Switch
    Shitty Mac, I got an old G3 laptop for $50.
    One Intel Macintosh with system 10.5 (I got my mac mini for $200, and love it!)
    The Snow Leopard OS ($30)
    Old Airport, wireless B will be fine. $20 on ebay?
    A mac/Windows comptable printer, (you might already have one!)


    When you are done you'll be able to resell it all for what you paid. So toss it on your credit card and mow through before the month is up.

    You MUST have a physical macintosh as some of the lab require you to hardware related things.

    There is a requirement for basic BASH knowledge. Most of it you can learn
    -Daniel
  • NinjaBoyNinjaBoy Posts: 968Registered Members
    /pub/beer/ wrote: »
    I've not even heard of that entry level exam...

    It's a new Apple cert, they just recently released the Mac integration cert for the 10.6 OS.

    -Ken
  • badboyeeebadboyeee Posts: 348Registered Members
    Daniel333 wrote: »
    One Windows 2003 server configured as a DC
    One Windows XP Based Comp, dual boot ubuntu is also helpful
    Cheap Switch
    Shitty Mac, I got an old G3 laptop for $50.
    One Intel Macintosh with system 10.5 (I got my mac mini for $200, and love it!)
    The Snow Leopard OS ($30)
    Old Airport, wireless B will be fine. $20 on ebay?
    A mac/Windows comptable printer, (you might already have one!)

    Okay after I'm done with my Security+ exam, I wanna turn my home network into some sort of lab.

    I already have a XP desktop that I built back in 2004 (set as an HTPC in my living room).

    I also have a Netbook that is XP based..

    Last summer I was in the process of building another desktop PC (AMD Phenom II X2 555 w/ 4gb ram). I'm actually almost finished, I need a dvd-rom. What OS should I install on this or how should I set this puppy up?

    I have an ATT Uverse router w/ built in switch that connects my internet, but I probably should get another switch (a Cisco one?).

    I also have another desktop tower PC (Athlon XP 1700+, 1gb??) I built in back in 1999, but its in storage (hard drive gone, I think PSU is bad)..

    I wanna be able to install Windows Server, Linux, and Mac OS X. I guess for the Linux and Mac OS X I can just run Virtual Box??

    For 2011, my plan so far is to do the Mac integration w/ PC cert, a MS cert (not sure which one), take a CCNA course throughout the year (hopefully results at least getting a CCENT cert), and maybe squeeze in Linux+ ..

    Need some guidance on what I should do here.. icon_scratch.gif
    2011 Certification Plans so far:
    [Cisco: CCENT (ICND1)-> CCNA (ICND2)]
    [MS: MCP-> MCDST-> MCTS / MCITP:ESDT7-> MCITP:EDA7]

    Class taking:
    [Cisco NetAcademy - Network Fundamentals (35%)]

    Video currently watching:

    [CBT Nuggets - CCENT w/ Jeremy (50%)]
    [CBT Nuggets - 20-721 (40%)
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Posts: 2,070Registered Members
    Hey guy,

    There isn't an easy answer here. Sadly there is no certification study path that fills in all the gaps. You MUST fall in love with this stuff. You must WANT to do this. XBox isn't your hobby, this is.

    There are so many directions you can head. But I honestly believe Cisco and Microsoft's certifications paths provide the concept and the real world experience to succeed.

    Consider starting with learning Windows XP. THE 70-271, 70-272 AND 70-270 video on vtc.com will really give you an idea of what this old old operating system and itg's big cousin windows 2003 can do. You don't need to certify up at all and it runs on any old comp just fine. From there, if I were you? Maybe I would consider the 70-290 cert for your Microsoft exam.

    No easy answer here. Tell me a little more about your training and experience?
    -Daniel
  • badboyeeebadboyeee Posts: 348Registered Members
    Daniel333 wrote: »
    Hey guy,

    There isn't an easy answer here. Sadly there is no certification study path that fills in all the gaps. You MUST fall in love with this stuff. You must WANT to do this. XBox isn't your hobby, this is.

    There are so many directions you can head. But I honestly believe Cisco and Microsoft's certifications paths provide the concept and the real world experience to succeed.

    Consider starting with learning Windows XP. THE 70-271, 70-272 AND 70-270 video on vtc.com will really give you an idea of what this old old operating system and itg's big cousin windows 2003 can do. You don't need to certify up at all and it runs on any old comp just fine. From there, if I were you? Maybe I would consider the 70-290 cert for your Microsoft exam.

    No easy answer here. Tell me a little more about your training and experience?

    Yes, I have a xbox360 but it hasn't been touched in months icon_lol.gif. So I will be dedicated to transforming my home network to some sort of lab. I'm really in need to update my IT knowledge and jazzy up my resume. I want to learn all this newer technology. Since I will be done with my CompTIA trifecta soon, I understand from after this point and on, that hands-on experience is crucial to pass the next-level of certifications.

    My skills are mostly XP based but I wouldn't say I'm equivalent to a MCP right now. Half of my job is being the IT guy for a small business (for the past 6 years). I'm not getting the experience I need and pay is low so I want to leave this ****. I tried to leave a couple years ago but was unsuccessful finding another job, then I became content with what I have considering the economy. But I can't take it anymore, I'm not getting anywhere with this job. I also have an IT degree from 2004 and you see my certs. I have years of experience implementing basic SOHO type networks. Most of my experience is windows client operating systems (XP mainly). I've dual booted XP and 2000 before but its been awhile. I also been building PC systems since I was in high school.

    So do you think I should go for MCSA instead of MCITP?? I'd probably be more comfortable doing XP / 2003 certs but I don't want to be outdated and have potential jobs wonder why I don't just go for W7 / 2008 at this point..

    I want to work my way up, I heard the Apple certs are easier so I can work on that for a month or two at most. So maybe at first just have Mac OS X set up virtually. I think that will make my resume better if I apply for another school district job. I'd probably need to add Windows Server to my network as well.. Then move on to starting MS and CCNA (probably just CCENT for this year). I know gaining these skills will take some time, this is what I have planned for the year 2011. What do you guys think?
    2011 Certification Plans so far:
    [Cisco: CCENT (ICND1)-> CCNA (ICND2)]
    [MS: MCP-> MCDST-> MCTS / MCITP:ESDT7-> MCITP:EDA7]

    Class taking:
    [Cisco NetAcademy - Network Fundamentals (35%)]

    Video currently watching:

    [CBT Nuggets - CCENT w/ Jeremy (50%)]
    [CBT Nuggets - 20-721 (40%)
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Posts: 2,070Registered Members
    I would just say build on the experience you have, and push it toward the experience you want.

    MCSA if you already are at that level is a great idea. Then just upgrade it to MCITP.
    -Daniel
  • roarkltdroarkltd Posts: 2Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'd like to disagree with some of the posters who indicated you need to buy all this expensive equipment in order to get an entry-level Apple cert. It'd be nice to have it, but you can get away with doing all of the ACSP exercises in the Peachpit book for Support Essentials with a single Mac. I suggest looking around eBay for an Intel-based machine with at least 2 GB and buying a copy of Snow Leopard on eBay also. That should be plenty.

    When you start getting into Server Essentials and some of the ACSA exams, you might need a little extra equipment. By extra I mean another Mac running Snow Leopard server. That's about it.

    Many school Districts rely heavily on Macs because of the old adage that they are easy to use, and the truism that they are mostly virus-free. In fact, it's a solid Unix-based platform. And once you start learning the command line, you can easily translate that knowledge to other Unixes.

    I recommend starting with Mac Integration Basics 10.6 and then moving on to Apple Certified Support Professional. Once you're able to actually land a job where you can get hands on experience for a couple of months, continue studying for the ACTC and the ACSA.

    Hope that helps.

    Apple Certification Videos
  • badboyeeebadboyeee Posts: 348Registered Members
    roarkltd wrote: »
    I'd like to disagree with some of the posters who indicated you need to buy all this expensive equipment in order to get an entry-level Apple cert. It'd be nice to have it, but you can get away with doing all of the ACSP exercises in the Peachpit book for Support Essentials with a single Mac. I suggest looking around eBay for an Intel-based machine with at least 2 GB and buying a copy of Snow Leopard on eBay also. That should be plenty.

    When you start getting into Server Essentials and some of the ACSA exams, you might need a little extra equipment. By extra I mean another Mac running Snow Leopard server. That's about it.

    Many school Districts rely heavily on Macs because of the old adage that they are easy to use, and the truism that they are mostly virus-free. In fact, it's a solid Unix-based platform. And once you start learning the command line, you can easily translate that knowledge to other Unixes.

    I recommend starting with Mac Integration Basics 10.6 and then moving on to Apple Certified Support Professional. Once you're able to actually land a job where you can get hands on experience for a couple of months, continue studying for the ACTC and the ACSA.

    Hope that helps.

    Apple Certification Videos

    Thanks for the recommendation. Checked out your website as well, you think I can pass Mac Integration Basics with just watching your videos and reading the study guide (pdf & website version)?

    Or should I get something like this to lab with:
    Apple Mac mini (1.83 GHz, 2 GB RAM, 80 GB HDD) - eBay (item 180611720267 end time Jan-18-11 19:22:12 PST)

    is there anything else cheaper?
    2011 Certification Plans so far:
    [Cisco: CCENT (ICND1)-> CCNA (ICND2)]
    [MS: MCP-> MCDST-> MCTS / MCITP:ESDT7-> MCITP:EDA7]

    Class taking:
    [Cisco NetAcademy - Network Fundamentals (35%)]

    Video currently watching:

    [CBT Nuggets - CCENT w/ Jeremy (50%)]
    [CBT Nuggets - 20-721 (40%)
  • zdravkozdravko Posts: 12Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    If you want ot pass the exam without spending additional 200$ for ACSP 10.10 you can download iLearn: Advance ACSP application on your iPhone/iPad this help me a lot to pass the exam with 90%. To study and understand Mac you need to answer all questions read the answer and explanation and also TEST ON YOUR MAC COMPUTER, so with experiment with your Mac you will learn how it will be in real environment.
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