Microsoft Cert Path Help?

over9000over9000 Member Posts: 30 ■■□□□□□□□□
I finished the CompTIA Trinity! :D However, I'm a little confused on what to do next. I ultimately want to do database stuff, but I also want to get some more hands on experience too (a more technical Help Desk Job or Network job while studying for SQL Server exams). I'm scared I'm just getting paper certs right now.

I'm thinking about getting the MCDST cert, then MCSA, or just getting some OS certs in hopes of getting a better Help Desk job and then I'll start studying to be a Database Developer in the future.

Another quick question: How hard is it to get an entry level developer job with just SQL certs. If I'm going about this the wrong way, then any advice would be appreciated. (Don't want to get the certs and have no job offers either!! icon_cry.gif)

Comments

  • ehndeehnde Member Posts: 1,103
    over9000 wrote: »
    I finished the CompTIA Trinity! :D However, I'm a little confused on what to do next. I ultimately want to do database stuff, but I also want to get some more hands on experience too (a more technical Help Desk Job or Network job while studying for SQL Server exams). I'm scared I'm just getting paper certs right now.

    I'm thinking about getting the MCDST cert, then MCSA, or just getting some OS certs in hopes of getting a better Help Desk job and then I'll start studying to be a Database Developer in the future.

    Another quick question: How hard is it to get an entry level developer job with just SQL certs. If I'm going about this the wrong way, then any advice would be appreciated. (Don't want to get the certs and have no job offers either!! icon_cry.gif)

    You're not getting paper certs. Your 3 comptia certs are more than enough to get a helpdesk job. Helpdesk experience would make you qualified to work helpdesk moreso than new helpdesk type certs. Once you have a helpdesk job, you don't need more helpdesk certs to become a DBA. If you want to be a DBA get oracle certifications and/or MCDBA MCDBA Certification | Microsoft Certified Database Administrator

    The helpdesk should be a stepping stone for you because you want to be a DBA, don't bother with MCDST. Get started working towards your dream job now!
    Climb a mountain, tell no one.
  • HypntickHypntick Member Posts: 1,451 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I'm in a similar boat to you. Got some help desk experience but that's about it. It's something I notice a lot "X years experience required!" Well how are you supposed to get that experience if there aren't many/any entry level jobs in that field.

    A lot of people say you need to know people and network. Unfortunately my network consists of other entry level guys trying to get that valuable job experience. I did hear from a recruiter once that basically said, put your certs at the top of your resume, you don't have a lot of experience and your certs will help you stand out more.

    That's what i'm banking on right now, while trying to find something more in admin i'm plugging away on certs to make myself more marketable. I may not have the work history to back me up, but if I ever land that interview I can prove I know what I know.
    WGU BS:IT Completed June 30th 2012.
    WGU MS:ISA Completed October 30th 2013.
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    If you want to get into DBA, I don't know how valuable an MCDST (or windows 7 equivalent) will do for you unless you are planning on a desktop support position as a stepping stone.

    I'd want to get into MCSA/MCITP:SA material and use that as your platform to move over. Hopefully RK sees this topic, I'm sure he will have some good advice for you.
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298 ■■■■■■■■■■
    ehnde wrote: »
    You're not getting paper certs. Your 3 comptia certs are more than enough to get a helpdesk job. Helpdesk experience would make you qualified to work helpdesk moreso than new helpdesk type certs. Once you have a helpdesk job, you don't need more helpdesk certs to become a DBA. If you want to be a DBA get oracle certifications and/or MCDBA MCDBA Certification | Microsoft Certified Database Administrator

    The helpdesk should be a stepping stone for you because you want to be a DBA, don't bother with MCDST. Get started working towards your dream job now!

    The MCDBA is defunct. Please do a Google search on the MCITP: DBA cert for the current certifications.

    Now for this thread in general - let's pull this back a notch here. One does not go from desktop support to DBA via certification alone and it is foolish to think that going from desktop support directly to DBA is really going to be very possible unless you are also finishing some sort of University level degree while doing the support role. If the OP is looking for an eventual Production DBA position (meaning the care, feeding, and support of a SQL Server and not really the development, creation and optimization of databases) then I would first suggest starting off with a 3 year goal of becoming a server admin. If the OP is looking for a developer sort of role within SQL Server then I suggest that he first start looking at developer positions and learning some .Net in conjunction with SQL. That is an entirely different sort of skill set, though.
    If you are looking to eventually become a DBA I suggest you start with this certification path:

    Year 1 - 2011
    MCITP EDST 7 – start studying to be a server admin. Work hard at your current job and show ambition!
    MCITP: EDA7 to show higher technical ability than just a phone support role. Easy certs for one year! The key here is focus on career.

    Year 2 - 2012
    Server+ and MCITP: Server Admin
    This needs to be accompanied by serious career mobility. You need to be busting into the server admin role by this time. Even if it means a smaller company where you are looking at being a one man show running Exchange, SharePoint, SQL, and everything on the network. Start participating in the local SQL Server users group.

    Year 3 – 2013
    Storage and SQL Server certifications. For a DBA knowing technologies like iSCSI is important. Just an entry level cert would be fine as you don’t need to be a storage admin. Then start focusing on the SQL Server stuff. At this point Denali (What's New (SQL Server "Denali")) should be the current version – I guess SQL Server 2012? Now you can start looking for roles in larger environments where you will be touching SQL Server as a part of your job. You might not have the title of DBA but being the server admin in charge of the SQL systems will be a step in that direction. By 2014/2015 I would then start looking at SQL Server specific jobs.

    This is not something you should just jump into. Have a serious but obtainable plan to advance your career!
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Hypntick wrote: »
    A lot of people say you need to know people and network. Unfortunately my network consists of other entry level guys trying to get that valuable job experience. I did hear from a recruiter once that basically said, put your certs at the top of your resume, you don't have a lot of experience and your certs will help you stand out more.

    Check out the users groups for specific technologies you are interested in. But you cannot just go to the meetings. You have to participate. Ask question and even present!

    SharePoint:
    sharepoint users group - Google Search=

    SQL Server:
    sql Server PASS - Google Search=

    MS Exchange Server:
    exchange server users group - Google Search=

    The point is get out in the community and start to represent yourself!
  • NinjaBoyNinjaBoy Member Posts: 968
    IMO, it really does depend on what "role" of the DBA you see yourself doing. Microsoft has a DBA route already and if you want to go down that route I would recommend doing that...

    MTA: Database Fundamentals -> MCTS (relating to SQL) -> MCITP: Database Administrator 2008 and/or MCITP: Database Developer 2008

    Most, if not all, of the DBA's that I know only have certs relating to DB's (regardless of whether it's MS, MySQL or Oracle). DBA's do not need to know how to design an AD, a VDI, or a multi-site/multi-domain infrastructure.

    But that's just me...

    -Ken
  • DevilsbaneDevilsbane Member Posts: 4,212 ■■■■■■■■□□
    haha I told you so!

    And as for networking, we all start somewhere. My first network consisted of some other freshman level college students, a couple professors, and a family friend. That network has grown and includes a lot more people now. Just hang in there
    Decide what to be and go be it.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298 ■■■■■■■■■■
    NinjaBoy wrote: »
    IMO, it really does depend on what "role" of the DBA you see yourself doing. Microsoft has a DBA route already and if you want to go down that route I would recommend doing that...

    MTA: Database Fundamentals -> MCTS (relating to SQL) -> MCITP: Database Administrator 2008 and/or MCITP: Database Developer 2008

    Most, if not all, of the DBA's that I know only have certs relating to DB's (regardless of whether it's MS, MySQL or Oracle). DBA's do not need to know how to design an AD, a VDI, or a multi-site/multi-domain infrastructure.

    But that's just me...

    -Ken
    No, they don't - generally. But we do need to understand AD and GPOs, DNS and networking - DBAs are also not simply hatched out of thin air.

    Of the SQL Servers that my company uses I set up every single one. I also set up the VMWare systems and configured the SAN that all of this runs on. I administer our AD, I administer our DNS but I am also one of the guys who runs the SQL Servers.

    If you think all a DBA ever does is manage SQL Server you are incorrect. A production DBA must first be an exceptional server administrator. Many DBAs have additinal responsabilities that go out of the realm of SQL. All DBAs need to be able to communicate properly with the other teams in IT. I have to be able to talk to the networking guys in a way they understand and can respect. I need to be able to talk to the server guys as well. I also have to have some sort of understanding of what they do.

    Just as an example: if a sys admin wants me to place an active directory group in a SQL Server group I need to understand what that means as I no longer have control of the SQL Server group.
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