Should I attempt to take this exam?

VinUnleadedVinUnleaded Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hello

I just got my A+ certification after 2 weeks of reading a study guide. Ive been building home computers for family and friends. Some experience in setting up and maintaining network of several computers with the WAN/LAN configurations but no college training at all. My question is: based on those experiences, do you think its possible to get the Network+ and CCNA certifications by reading study guides?
I really want to get this job in my company that requires the CCNA certification. Im currently in the customer care area and in the second year of my BAS degree. I havent learned anything related to the IT field yet, just a whole bunch of general courses and some Javascript and C#. I'm planning on spending my spare time reading study guides but I'd hate to waste my time attempting the impossible

Any thought?

Comments

  • cisco_certscisco_certs Posts: 119Member
    You can try to take it.

    Why dont you try and pass the Network + then jump to CCNA?
    I believe that CCNA study guide is enough to pass the exam.
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    Personally, I wouldn't bother with the Network+ exam. From what I've heard and read, most of the information in there is outdated and pretty useless in the real world.

    IMO you'd be better off doing the ICND1 and go from there.
  • VinUnleadedVinUnleaded Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    wbosher wrote: »
    Personally, I wouldn't bother with the Network+ exam. From what I've heard and read, most of the information in there is outdated and pretty useless in the real world.

    IMO you'd be better off doing the ICND1 and go from there.

    Thanks for the quick responses guys.
    wbosher: Does CCNA cover everything Network+ does? Will I miss any important information if I skip it?
  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIPosts: 1,854Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Just by simply reading books? Absolutely not. You're going to need to get some hands on and apply what you've read. Setting up a home network isn't going to cut it.

    You can use a simulator, or you can use real gear, but you're going to have to actually do it.

    But above all, welcome to the forum! My goal is not to scare you off, its very possible to learn the CCNA material by self studying. Its just going to take more work than you seem to believe.
  • VinUnleadedVinUnleaded Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    alan2308 wrote: »
    Just by simply reading books? Absolutely not. You're going to need to get some hands on and apply what you've read. Setting up a home network isn't going to cut it.

    You can use a simulator, or you can use real gear, but you're going to have to actually do it.

    But above all, welcome to the forum! My goal is not to scare you off, its very possible to learn the CCNA material by self studying. Its just going to take more work than you seem to believe.

    thanks alan. Where do I find a simulator for such topic?
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    Thanks for the quick responses guys.
    wbosher: Does CCNA cover everything Network+ does? Will I miss any important information if I skip it?

    No, because Network+ includes a lot of ancient crap that no-one uses any more (eg Appletalk icon_rolleyes.gif). I studied for it about three or four years ago, so it may have changed since then.

    It probably can't hurt to read through the book to get some grounding in networking in general, but I wouldn't bother sitting the exam. It costs twice as much as CCNA, and an employer probably wouldn't recognise it as much as a Cisco qual.
  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIPosts: 1,854Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    thanks alan. Where do I find a simulator for such topic?

    Start here and grab a copy of GNS3.

    Go here to use it. The labs begin with setting up GNS3 and go through all of the CCNA exam topics.
  • VinUnleadedVinUnleaded Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    alan2308 wrote: »
    Start here and grab a copy of GNS3.

    Go here to use it. The labs begin with setting up GNS3 and go through all of the CCNA exam topics.

    Thank you for all your help guys.
  • ehndeehnde Posts: 1,103Member
    Another vote for ICND1. Skip Network+. Your job wants a CCNA, you said it yourself. And you sound like a pretty smart guy, but don't underestimate Cisco exams. Everyone on techexams will tell you Cisco exams are harder than most of the CompTIA exams.

    Drawing on my own experience I know that Microsoft exams are harder than CompTIA exams.

    You should be able to subnet fairly quick for the ICND1. Lab experience will really help you. Also try to study from more than one source. If you want a really thorough text try picking up Odom's book. It's well written and thorough.
    Climb a mountain, tell no one.
  • MonkerzMonkerz Posts: 842Member
    You really need to crack open the book and start learning before fiddling with a simulator(packet tracer) or emulator(GNS3). My guess is, you are where a was a few years ago. I thought I had some experience with networking from setting up home networks. Boy was I in for a surprise. There is a lot more to it than just unpacking a linksys wireless router, assigning an IP address, plugging in some cables, joining workstations and servers to a domain, and sharing resources.

    I started with Net+, which did enlighten me. I had a broad understanding of networking when I passed the Net+ exam. But, and I mean a huge BUT, CCNA is Net+ on serious steroids. In fact, I think we have a saying here that states CCNA=Net+^9. If you have the "experience" I did, setting up a generic SOHO, CCNA will require you to go through the book 2 or 3 times and labbing after every chapter. It took me 6 months of dedicated study/lab time each night before I felt I was comfortable with sitting for the exam.
  • WillTech105WillTech105 Posts: 216Member
    I actually went backwards. I got my ICND1 THEN went for my Net+.

    Once you clock a few years under your belt, IMO A+ and Net+ are useless. Especially if you already have ICDN1. Alot of the material in Net+ is already presented in ICDN1 and ICND2.

    A+ and Net+ are mainly for people who want to break into the field and have no exp or only are interns. I only got them later in my career for complicity sake.

    As for if you feel you are ready, for ICND1 you can pass it with a normal Cisco 851 router. Connect to it, play around with the commands, and you should be fine. ICND2 is a beast compared to ICND1 -- don't take it lightly.
    In Progress: CCNP ROUTE
  • VinUnleadedVinUnleaded Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Ive been in Customer Care for 3 years now and feel so lost until I found this forum. Again thank you for all your inputs.
  • jbylsmajbylsma Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    The CCNA is not just a certification but a right of passage for a network tech. With that said its no small feat. Don't be discouraged, its an attainable objective as any other cert however the time investment on this one may be far greater.

    Depending on how much networking experience you have a wouldn't recommend starting with a book. Start with a good CBT and graduate to a book and practice questions. Buying a small cisco router and switch, in my opinion, is a must if you really want to know the IOS.

    If you have the resources take a college level CCNA course.

    Good luck in your studies! :)
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    I went ahead and did A+ just to prove to myself I could do it, I did Net + because I was very weak on my networking skills. With that said, I agree with the CCNA route. Net + is for people new to the industry or people who have a small understanding but who want to fill in the knowledge gaps. I was in that boat. I was actually doing network analyst type work, I still am actually, and network + helped, but I am still learning on the job. If I had the CCENT or higher I would be so much better at my job.
  • ibcritnibcritn Posts: 340Member
    Hello

    I just got my A+ certification after 2 weeks of reading a study guide. Ive been building home computers for family and friends. Some experience in setting up and maintaining network of several computers with the WAN/LAN configurations but no college training at all. My question is: based on those experiences, do you think its possible to get the Network+ and CCNA certifications by reading study guides?
    I really want to get this job in my company that requires the CCNA certification. Im currently in the customer care area and in the second year of my BAS degree. I havent learned anything related to the IT field yet, just a whole bunch of general courses and some Javascript and C#. I'm planning on spending my spare time reading study guides but I'd hate to waste my time attempting the impossible

    Any thought?

    Start learning! Get CBT Nuggest for CCNA and couple the video training with Packet tracer.

    Be prepared to not learn much of value from your degree. I find that most colleges don't do a good job teaching you hands on. Maybe see if your college offers Cisco Networking Academy.
    CISSP | GCIH | CEH | CNDA | LPT | ECSA | CCENT | MCTS | A+ | Net+ | Sec+

    Next Up: Linux+/RHCSA, GCIA
  • wbosherwbosher Posts: 422Member
    ibcritn wrote: »
    Start learning! Get CBT Nuggest for CCNA and couple the video training with Packet tracer.

    Be prepared to not learn much of value from your degree. I find that most colleges don't do a good job teaching you hands on. Maybe see if your college offers Cisco Networking Academy.

    I agree, CBT Nuggets are a great source for CCNA.
  • agpltagplt Posts: 39Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I won't say anything new or anything special but go to CCNA path it's real thing, also it's very challenging with a lot information, a lot and some information is really heavy, but if it would be easy it won't be so interesting and so appreciable, just get cbt nuggets with Jeremy Cioara, he makes studies much easier and funnier i mean he explains fundamentals really good. After that i suggest you to get Todd Lammle CCNA Network Study guide. For more information you can check in forum, there's a lot topic in this field. Just have patience and motivation, also work hard and i believe you will be successful ! icon_cheers.gif Don't forget to practice on real things or simulations ! it's really important, i am now in study progress and i will take test not so soon that's for sure... i have a lot of gaps... but i believe in myself either, !
    Currently working on:
    - CCNA
    Future plans:
    - CCNA Security
    - CCNA Voice


    Currently reading:

    - Todd Lammle “CCNA: Cisco Certified Network Associate Study Guide, 5th Edition (640-801)
    Currently watching:
    - CBTnuggets Cisco 640-822 Jeremy Cioara

    2011 10k challenge
    Pages read: 137
  • ibcritnibcritn Posts: 340Member
    wbosher wrote: »
    No, because Network+ includes a lot of ancient crap that no-one uses any more (eg Appletalk icon_rolleyes.gif). I studied for it about three or four years ago, so it may have changed since then.

    I certainly agree with skipping Network+ IF your goals are going into cisco certs. It does help to have Network+ knowledge going into CCENT/CCNA training, but you don't need it. Network+ didn't mean too much to employers for me and if you plan on going into CCNA id skip it.

    I am not bashing Network+ it is certainly a good cert to have I just think that once you have CCENT or CCNA having Network+ is kinda mute.
    CISSP | GCIH | CEH | CNDA | LPT | ECSA | CCENT | MCTS | A+ | Net+ | Sec+

    Next Up: Linux+/RHCSA, GCIA
  • VinUnleadedVinUnleaded Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    ibcritn wrote: »
    I certainly agree with skipping Network+ IF your goals are going into cisco certs. It does help to have Network+ knowledge going into CCENT/CCNA training, but you don't need it. Network+ didn't mean too much to employers for me and if you plan on going into CCNA id skip it.

    I am not bashing Network+ it is certainly a good cert to have I just think that once you have CCENT or CCNA having Network+ is kinda mute.

    The only reason I considered taking Network+ is because I thought it was necessary in order to transition to CCNA. If skipping Network+ is the recommendation here then no Network+ it is
  • shaX 07shaX 07 Posts: 65Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    The only reason I considered taking Network+ is because I thought it was necessary in order to transition to CCNA. If skipping Network+ is the recommendation here then no Network+ it is

    I agree with others in that if you are planning to do CCENT and/or CCNA than you may want to skip over Network+. If anything, once you have your CCNA, you could easily pass Network+. I wouldn't say that Network+ is an easy exam/cert, as it is not a cakewalk but it is certainly not on the level of CCNA.

    I just passed my Security+ and Network+ last week, 2 days apart. I got my A+ in July and i've been working in IT for a year and a half, mainly desktop support with no professional networking experience.
    Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+, Server+
    Vendor Certs: Epic Client Systems Management, Epic Client Systems Management w/ Hyperspace Web
    College: B.S. - Computer Information Systems
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