WIC1T or WIC2T

Jas21Jas21 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Sorry for a newbie question, but can I do with 2 x WIC1T cards what you can do with 1 x WIC2T ???

I have 2 x 2621XM both with 1 x WIC1T card and I want to get another router to do frame relay - should I get WIC2T cards for them all, or put another WIC1T card in the spare slot?

Thanks!

Comments

  • jdfriesenjdfriesen Posts: 45Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Yes, 2 x WIC-1T will be the equivalent of 1 x WIC-2T. The differences are just the connector type, and that you're using 2 slots for the WIC-1T's, versus just 1 for the WIC-2T.
  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIPosts: 1,854Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    There isn't any difference in functionality between the two, the only difference is port count. If you care about port density, get the WIC-2T, otherwise go with which ever is cheaper per port.
  • Jas21Jas21 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    OK that's cool - so same but different - and different cable - DB60 to Smart Serial

    Cheers
  • lwwarnerlwwarner Posts: 144Member
    The cable type just depends on what you are connecting to. I currently have only WIC-2T serial ports in my lab so all of my cables are SS-to-SS. I like the SS cables better than the old bulky DB60 cables. I use a 2620 with 2x WIC-2T cards in it as my 4-port frame relay switch. This same 2620 also has an NM-16A in it and doubles as my terminal server.
  • tierstentiersten Posts: 4,505Member
    alan2308 wrote: »
    There isn't any difference in functionality between the two, the only difference is port count.
    WIC-1T can only do sync serial at a maximum of 2Mbps. The WIC-2T can do 8Mbps on each port concurrently if you plug it into a suitable router.

    Not that it matters for a lab :)
  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIPosts: 1,854Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    tiersten wrote: »
    WIC-1T can only do sync serial at a maximum of 2Mbps. The WIC-2T can do 8Mbps on each port concurrently if you plug it into a suitable router.

    Not that it matters for a lab :)

    I meant actual features, but the difference in potential speed is good to know in case someone is thinking beyond a lab setup.
  • ZeroHunterZeroHunter Posts: 148Member
    lwwarner wrote: »
    The cable type just depends on what you are connecting to. I currently have only WIC-2T serial ports in my lab so all of my cables are SS-to-SS. I like the SS cables better than the old bulky DB60 cables. I use a 2620 with 2x WIC-2T cards in it as my 4-port frame relay switch. This same 2620 also has an NM-16A in it and doubles as my terminal server.

    I could not agree more with you, I think that the little bit extra you pay for the WIC-2T (in my case WIC-2A/S's) is easily made up for in what you save in cable cost. I find that the old, larger, and heavier DB-60 cost more then the Smart Serial Cables.

    Also I am doing the same thing (2) WIC-2A/S's in a NM-2W make up my Frame Relay.

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  • Jas21Jas21 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    OK so cable confusion

    I need the following:

    DCE/DTE Smart Serial cables (for the WIC-2T to WIC-2T connections)

    and

    Serial to Smart Serial cables (for the NM-4A/S to WIC-2T connections)

    Can someone please link to either diagrams or links for sale so I know what I'm buying?!
  • Jas21Jas21 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    That's great, cheers
  • Jas21Jas21 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Duh - so I got the cables as linked ^

    My question now - how to cable up?

    I have 3 x routers - each with 1 x WIC2T and 1 (which I intended to do frame relay/clocking duties) has NM-4A/S serial interface

    So I have the DCE end of the DCE to SS cables in the 1 NM-4A/S serial interface

    The other end I take it into 1 of the WIC2T slots on the other routers?

    And the remaining 1 slot in the WIC2T on each router, into the other routers

    Is that correct?

    Thanks
  • Patel128Patel128 Posts: 339Member
    Jas21 wrote: »
    Duh - so I got the cables as linked ^

    My question now - how to cable up?

    I have 3 x routers - each with 1 x WIC2T and 1 (which I intended to do frame relay/clocking duties) has NM-4A/S serial interface

    So I have the DCE end of the DCE to SS cables in the 1 NM-4A/S serial interface

    The other end I take it into 1 of the WIC2T slots on the other routers?

    And the remaining 1 slot in the WIC2T on each router, into the other routers

    Is that correct?

    Thanks


    Yup, that is exactly what I am doing in mine. I made a serial/ethernet topology before i did mine just to see what all of the layouts i needed. I plugged all of the SS coming from the NM-4A/S in to 0/0 on the WIC-2Ts. and then i got 2 SS to SS cables and plugged Router 1's 0/1 (on WIC-2T) to Router 2' s 0/1 (on WIC-2T) and i did the same for Routers 3 and 4.
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  • Jas21Jas21 Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    ^ cheers - does it matter if the back to backs are DCE in the same slots - i.e. if lets say Router 1 is acting as frame relay switch, then I take it all DCE ends should be in the one - then the back to back cables from the WIC2T's - slot 0 DCE to DTE in slot 1 on router 2 - slot 0 on router 2 to slot 1 on router 3...then slot 0 on router 3 to where?
  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIPosts: 1,854Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Jas21 wrote: »
    ^ cheers - does it matter if the back to backs are DCE in the same slots - i.e. if lets say Router 1 is acting as frame relay switch, then I take it all DCE ends should be in the one - then the back to back cables from the WIC2T's - slot 0 DCE to DTE in slot 1 on router 2 - slot 0 on router 2 to slot 1 on router 3...then slot 0 on router 3 to where?

    When you're cabling up things, all you really care about is that the router that the DCE end plugs into provides clocking for the line. It doesn't really matter which end gets the DCE end, or how many DCE ends one router gets. In a lab environment at least, providing clocking for multiple serial lines isn't going to put a detrimental strain on a router.

    When I'm labing something up, I just add a clock rate on every serial interface that I configure. The interfaces with a DTE end will just ignore it. That way I don't have to worry about remembering which way I ran the cable, and it helps to remember about clock rates.
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