R&S CCIE written query

tinu_karkitinu_karki Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Ok i have decided to get the ball rolling for my CCIE R&S. I would ideally like to sit the written around Oct-Nov. As for the lab, I'm not even thinking about it yet. So far I've purchased CCIE R&S Certification guide by Odom. Just for the written exams would you recommend any other written materials?

Comments

  • burbankmarcburbankmarc Posts: 460Member
    Here's some books that I, and I'm sure others, would recommend

    Routing TCP/IP Vol I and II
    MPLS Fundamentals
    Internet Routing Architectures
    QoS Exam Certification Guide

    Here's the actual list that Cisco recommends:

    https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/docs/DOC-4601
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    tinu_karki wrote: »
    Ok i have decided to get the ball rolling for my CCIE R&S. I would ideally like to sit the written around Oct-Nov. As for the lab, I'm not even thinking about it yet. So far I've purchased CCIE R&S Certification guide by Odom. Just for the written exams would you recommend any other written materials?

    The book definitely isn't written to teach you the subjects, more of a review. What ever your weak points are I'd definitely grab some supplemental reading from the sources burbankmarc has pointed out. The Routing TCP/IP books are dry, but full of useful knowledge.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • tinu_karkitinu_karki Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Guys thanks.

    I've actually already done the QoS certification about a year a go. Looks like I'll be getting
    TCP I and II
    MPLS Fundamentals
    Internet Routing Architectures
    as well as Odom.

    I might also get the CBT Nuggets as I found them to be quite good for my CCNP.

    Is there any particular order of reading for the books above?
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    I read them in the bellow order and I think they flowed well. Never ended up taking the written yet though so take my opinion with a grain of salt.

    Routing TCP/IP I
    Routing TCP/IP II
    Internet Routing Arch
    MPLS Fundamentals
    Cert Guide
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Member
    Can anybody recommend a good switching book?
    Currently Reading

    CUCM SRND 9x/10, UCCX SRND 10x, QOS SRND, SIP Trunking Guide, anything contact center related
  • gorebrushgorebrush Posts: 2,741Member
    Cisco Press LAN Switching probably :)
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    shodown wrote: »
    Can anybody recommend a good switching book?

    I usually just go through my BCMSN Study Guide (not the cert guide) when I need to brush up. Not sure if the SWITCH FLG would be just as useful though.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Member
    I usually just go through my BCMSN Study Guide (not the cert guide) when I need to brush up. Not sure if the SWITCH FLG would be just as useful though.


    I wasn't a big fan of this book. I did purchase the new switching book. Its kinda thin. Hopefully it covers everything.
    Currently Reading

    CUCM SRND 9x/10, UCCX SRND 10x, QOS SRND, SIP Trunking Guide, anything contact center related
  • PsychoFinPsychoFin Posts: 280Member
    I think the Foundation Learning Guide is a great resource on switching. I can't stand Cisco LAN Switching as it is so old now, but I am sure it has some concepts and things that are still the same.

    Cheers,
    Fin
  • 6stitches6stitches Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    so the reading list is really the following? (instead of the massive Cisco suggestion)

    Routing TCP/IP I
    Routing TCP/IP II
    Internet Routing Arch
    MPLS Fundamentals
    CCIE Cert Guide
    QOS Cert Guide
  • yuriz43yuriz43 Posts: 121Member
    RFCs. Don't ignore this source of information! Read them. Learn how to read them. Learn protocols and technologies from a vendor independent point of view. A lot of people find this difficult. And I agree that they can be tedious & hard to understand. But it is a skill you will develop over time. It's kind of like reading 'man pages'. People like to ignore them and want the information presented on a silver platter. But you must be able to glean information from these (at times cryptic) pieces of text.


    Print these out and read them! You don't have to read them cover to cover. But they are definitely worth your time and energy.

    RFC: 2328 OSPF

    RFC: 4271 BGP-4
    RFC: 3065 BGP Confederations
    RFC: 4456 BGP RR
    RFC: 1997 BGP Communities

    RFC: 2362 PIM SPARSE MODE
    RFC: 2236 IGMPv2
    RFC: 5059 BSR
  • ITdudeITdude Posts: 1,183Member
    yuriz43 wrote: »
    RFCs. Don't ignore this source of information! Read them.

    Excellent point!
    I usually hang out on 224.0.0.10 (FF02::A) and 224.0.0.5 (FF02::5) when I'm in a non-proprietary mood.

    __________________________________________
    Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.
    (Leonardo da Vinci)
  • tinu_karkitinu_karki Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    yuriz43 wrote: »
    RFCs. Don't ignore this source of information! Read them.

    Thanks Yuri, I read my first RFC the other day. RFC 2373 - IPv6 Addressing Architecture. I found it quite useful, it helped clarify some of the things I didn't understand from the IPv6 chapter in the Cisco Press books.

    Another thing I wanted to ask, while I study for written should I just focus mainly on the concepts and only focus on switch/router commands in detail once I begin studying for the lab? Or can anyone advise a more effective strategy for instead?
  • reaper81reaper81 Posts: 631Member
    Focus on the reading but you still need to know some of the syntax as well. I don't really know you're background, I started my CCIE journey as a CCNP so I had a lot for free that way. The certification guide will show you how to configure stuff also.
    Daniel Dib
    CCIE #37149
  • tinu_karkitinu_karki Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    reaper81 wrote: »
    Focus on the reading but you still need to know some of the syntax as well. I don't really know you're background, I started my CCIE journey as a CCNP so I had a lot for free that way. The certification guide will show you how to configure stuff also.

    I am comfortable with configuration of devices. I have my CCNP and also been working as NetEng for 7 or so years. However I dont have too much exposure to a few topics such as MPLS and BGP. I was just wondering if the written exam purely tested you on your knowledge of concepts or if they also ask about specific commands, debugging output etc (hope im not breaking any NDA rules here).
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