Cisco Network Academy Program

MuleSkinnerMuleSkinner Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
Cisco Network Academy Program
A local college offers this program and I'd be interested in taking it if I would be qualified for employment afterward. I have had no prior computer classes, certifications, etc. I am a radiographer looking to change careers (though I consider myself somewhat tech savvy, I can build my own PC, setup a home network, etc.).

Here is a link to the college and another describing what the academy is about:

Institute for Technology and Professional Studies at Bloomfield College
About Networking Academy - Program Overview - Cisco Systems

I went to an open house at the college, but I wasn't able to get many questions answered. I was only able to speak with one college rep and there were no instructors there. The course is two nights per week and 16 weeks long.

Can someone please tell me if after a course like this I'd be qualified for employment? Any insight to roughly what my salary expectations would be in the North New Jersey area?

Below is a link to another course I was considering, any input on that would also be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

http://www.essex.edu/academics/programs/pdfs/ntech.program.pdf

Comments

  • alan2308alan2308 CISSP, MCSA 2008, MCSA 2012, CCNA R&S, CCNA Security Ann Arbor, MIMember Posts: 1,854 ■■■■■■■■□□
    The program is geared towards learning the material that need in order to pass the CCNA certification. On their own, the classes mean nothing, they're just a couple college classes. Using the classes as part of a degree program and using it as a stepping stone towards passing the CCNA exam will HELP you with employment. Just don't expect your first job in I.T. to be exciting and high paying.

    A degree and a dozen certifications don't help with the no experience problem.
  • higherhohigherho Member Posts: 882
    Remember lab hours does count as experience. I went through the Network Academy CCNA (two semesters worth in college) and half of the CCNP track (two semesters worth). Over 100 hours of lab time. I have gotten good things said to me about taking the academy course because it proves that you are not just a paper cert. So for a college grad taking these during your degree time does help.

    But if you expect to get a job just by taking these classes and then passing the CCNA, eh you might get a NOC job (if they do not have any degree requirements). The classes do make you a better troubleshooter (depending on the teacher and how he teaches it).
  • rogue2shadowrogue2shadow CISSP, GXPN, OSCE, OSCP, OSWP, eMAPT, CEH, CNDA, A+, Network+, Security+ Member Posts: 1,501 ■■■■■■■■□□
    higherho wrote: »
    Remember lab hours does count as experience. I went through the Network Academy CCNA (two semesters worth in college) and half of the CCNP track (two semesters worth). Over 100 hours of lab time. I have gotten good things said to me about taking the academy course because it proves that you are not just a paper cert. So for a college grad taking these during your degree time does help.

    But if you expect to get a job just by taking these classes and then passing the CCNA, eh you might get a NOC job (if they do not have any degree requirements). The classes do make you a better troubleshooter (depending on the teacher and how he teaches it).

    I definitely agree. The biggest take away for me was the chance at an active lab. Night after night I was cranking out hours and being able to recognize and fix issues occurring with the equipment (generally due to age or misconfiguration) helped me a lot. I only took CCNA Explorations 1 and 2 but they were well worth it. Does this mean that you'll be 100% ready for a production environment? that'll be something to be seen.

  • MuleSkinnerMuleSkinner Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Would someone like me (no experience, no prior classes) be better off going with the program in my last link?
  • Howling MonkeyHowling Monkey Member Posts: 48 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Like my flight instructor use to say "if you want to be a pilot, you need air under your butt". Nothing compares to the real thing.
    This is the end and the beginning
  • str8outtajerzystr8outtajerzy Member Posts: 27 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Mule I don't know where you are, but if you can get to Rahway there's a school call Arthur McNeil institute I'm currently attending and we are about half way through, it seems to be pretty good. I also use CBT nuggets and a few other things to supplement the lesson and so far I must say I have grasped about 85% of the covered material. In the end though I think it's up to the individual, I have seen people on here self study with a homemade lab and some books and get certified so it's really up to you.
  • MuleSkinnerMuleSkinner Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Like my flight instructor use to say "if you want to be a pilot, you need air under your butt". Nothing compares to the real thing.
    Yet your flight instructor was still an instructor. I would like to get into networking and that's not going to happen without some instruction. Before I just pick a course, I'd like to get some guidance from those in the field whether or not some of the courses I'm looking at are my best bet. I don't want to waste time and money going to school and then finding out I did so and I wouldn't be qualified for even something entry level. I realize there are no guarantees, especially in this economy, but I want to at least be heading in the right direction.

    ETA: I'm in Bloomfield, str8outtajerzy. I'd rather not drive that far for every class if there's something equivalent closer to me. It sounds like a for profit school such as Devry or Chubb (now Anthem Institute) and I've heard I should stay away from those type of schools, but I'll take a look. Thanks.
  • Howling MonkeyHowling Monkey Member Posts: 48 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Yet your flight instructor was still an instructor. I would like to get into networking and that's not going to happen without some instruction. Before I just pick a course, I'd like to get some guidance from those in the field whether or not some of the courses I'm looking at are my best bet. I don't want to waste time and money going to school and then finding out I did so and I wouldn't be qualified for even something entry level. I realize there are no guarantees, especially in this economy, but I want to at least be heading in the right direction.

    Actually that was three years ago, and now he’s a co-pilot on CRJ’s for Horizon airlines. My point is instruction and sims are good, but to be truly competent at something you need to actually do it.
    This is the end and the beginning
  • nerdydadnerdydad Member Posts: 261
    I just finished my first year in the Networking Academy, and I think it is completely worth it. For one, you know the instructor actually knows a thing or two about real life networking.
  • moss12moss12 Banned Posts: 222
    My goodness radiographers earn good money in Australia.
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