Powershell Question

Ok so as far as I know there isn't a certification for powershell. Maybe i'm wrong? The main question I have is did anyone study this though and has it helped you in your job or get a better job? Or merely to boost your resume?

I'm thinking about getting more into PS since it seems to be so powerful a tool for windows. Also so it might look better on my resume. Would that be true?

Thanks!

Comments

  • aordalaordal Member Posts: 372
    You're right in that there isn't a certification. Sure it looks good on a resume but more importantly it makes your life easier. Plus its a pretty fun tool. Also it's a good skill to have as a lot of microsoft technologies are using it "underneath the hood" if you will.
  • DigitalZeroOneDigitalZeroOne Member Posts: 234 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I hope they don't introduce a powershell certification, certifications (IMO) are overrated, their are too many out there, and they don't truly measure skill. Of course there are certs like CCNA, RHCE, etc that do have hands-on, but they are the exception.

    Other than that, powershell is a very useful and extremely powerful tool, I use it just about every day in our vSphere environment. To really get into it, it will take some time; I want to be able to make huge scripts that perform complex tasks, so I try and study something about powershell every single day.

    If you are looking to save time and increase your productivity (i.e., more time to play games), a script that shuts down VMs, changes their memory, and powers them back on, is a lot better than doing it by hand, and compared to what I have seen, it's a very simple script. Definitely learn powershell, I only wish I started earlier with it.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher A cornfield in OhioMember Posts: 4,299 ■■■■■■■■■■
    loxleynew wrote: »
    The main question I have is did anyone study this though and has it helped you in your job or get a better job? Or merely to boost your resume?

    I use PoSh to do so manythings I cannot even imagine my life without it. I use it for managing SharePoint, SQL Server, Active Directory, VMWare (PowerCLI) and Server 2008 R2 at the OS level. My current boss mentioned it being on my rsume and stated he didn't think anyone would list such a thing as a skill unless they had found it very use full and he asked me how I had used it in the past. I explained a few ways including using it to integrate SQL Server data with SharePoint Services 3.0 lists and he was quite impressed. I think it was one of the things that got me the job.
    loxleynew wrote: »
    I'm thinking about getting more into PS since it seems to be so powerful a tool for windows. Also so it might look better on my resume. Would that be true?

    Thanks!

    People who do not currently know/use PowerShell and are responsible for the administration of Windows 7 and Windows Server systems are already very behind as admins. IMO, no serious desktop, server or systems admin should be lacking this skill. It is now built into the OS and every enterprise server app since Exchange 2007 and is a part of the Windows Management Framework Core.
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