Certs that would still be valid in 2-3 years

Thought I might bring up a topic for those of us going to school and wanting to get certs while at school. Which certs will still be valid in 3 years even with technology changing rapidly? We know that companies move slowly when it comes to changing their products.

Can anyone give any suggestions on which Operating Systems or application programs will still be valid with an employer in 3 years and be worthy of obtaining a certification now?

Comments

  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Armymanis wrote: »
    Thought I might bring up a topic for those of us going to school and wanting to get certs while at school. Which certs will still be valid in 3 years even with technology changing rapidly? We know that companies move slowly when it comes to changing their products.

    Can anyone give any suggestions on which Operating Systems or application programs will still be valid with an employer in 3 years and be worthy of obtaining a certification now?

    I think you are getting too hung up on certs. My MCSE in NT 4 is off the pace but I remain employable. Get the certs that teach you something useful and then throw yourself into the market place to get experience that people will value. Those two things combined are a powerful combination. Ultimately when hiring I look for what I can trust you to do not what you are qualified in.
  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    Turgon wrote: »
    I think you are getting too hung up on certs. My MCSE in NT 4 is off the pace but I remain employable. Get the certs that teach you something useful and then throw yourself into the market place to get experience that people will value. Those two things combined are a powerful combination. Ultimately when hiring I look for what I can trust you to do not what you are qualified in.

    Cool. I know microsoft office pretty well. I was thinking about getting the MOS specialist certification 2010. Do you think it would still be valid in three years time? I already have an IT employer that I am with and working with that says I can come back during each summer and work if they have projects and be able to get some IT experience. Many of the people at that company like me and say I am a hard worker.
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Armymanis wrote: »
    Cool. I know microsoft office pretty well. I was thinking about getting the MOS specialist certification 2010. Do you think it would still be valid in three years time? I already have an IT employer that I am with and working with that says I can come back during each summer and work if they have projects and be able to get some IT experience. Many of the people at that company like me and say I am a hard worker.

    I think the validity of the MOS cert for three years is the least of your concerns. There will be no leverage in that in 3 years time and if there is it's probably not in the sort of work you want to wind up doing. Get it if you think it will help you but most importantly get some *work* and then while doing it pay attention to what sort of work gets you on in that organisation. Then try and do that. Meanwhile pay attention to what sort of work gets you on elsewhere and try and do that. Jobs are no longer carved out by having this cert or that cert. In 1999 yes, but the people hiring didn't have a clue. Today they think they have a clue and it comes down to your portfolio of experience in the field. Think about it..back in 1999 if you had an MCSE you might be the only honcho in the department with one. Today they all have one! There wasn't much experience to go around back then to guide expectations on a potential hire.. there is today by the people hiring and the people you will be working along side..so get some.
  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    Turgon wrote: »
    I think the validity of the MOS cert for three years is the least of your concerns. There will be no leverage in that in 3 years time and if there is it's probably not in the sort of work you want to wind up doing. Get it if you think it will help you but most importantly get some *work* and then while doing it pay attention to what sort of work gets you on in that organisation. Then try and do that. Meanwhile pay attention to what sort of work gets you on elsewhere and try and do that. Jobs are no longer carved out by having this cert or that cert. In 1999 yes, but the people hiring didn't have a clue. Today they think they have a clue and it comes down to your portfolio of experience in the field. Think about it..back in 1999 if you had an MCSE you might be the only honcho in the department with one. Today they all have one! There wasn't much experience to go around back then to guide expectations on a potential hire.. there is today by the people hiring and the people you will be working along side..so get some.

    By the middle of September I should have 4 months of IT experience with HP hardware. I just think I should get some certifications while I am going to school so I can be ahead of the game more when I get out. That way I can apply for a better job then the one I have right now. The one I have right now, I do not even get to touch any software. I just get to touch the HP hardware. I am very happy to have a job in IT none-the less, but kind of want to move up. That's why I was thinking about getting a cert that is higher than comptia, but still considered entry level.
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Armymanis wrote: »
    By the middle of September I should have 4 months of IT experience with HP hardware. I just think I should get some certifications while I am going to school so I can be ahead of the game more when I get out. That way I can apply for a better job then the one I have right now. The one I have right now, I do not even get to touch any software. I just get to touch the HP hardware. I am very happy to have a job in IT none-the less, but kind of want to move up. That's why I was thinking about getting a cert that is higher than comptia, but still considered entry level.

    CCNA. Forget MS desktop applications. Do it now.
  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    Turgon wrote: »
    CCNA. Forget MS desktop applications. Do it now.


    Why do you say forget MS desktop applications? What's so bad about them?
  • WafflesAndRootbeerWafflesAndRootbeer Member Posts: 555
    Armymanis wrote: »
    Thought I might bring up a topic for those of us going to school and wanting to get certs while at school. Which certs will still be valid in 3 years even with technology changing rapidly? We know that companies move slowly when it comes to changing their products.

    Can anyone give any suggestions on which Operating Systems or application programs will still be valid with an employer in 3 years and be worthy of obtaining a certification now?

    Focus on getting certs relating to servers and vendor-specific network infrastructure (HP/Cisco) for the time being then nail the Windows 8 certs when they are available. Then you can focus on other software-related certs like Citrix.
  • EssendonEssendon Member Posts: 4,546 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Armymanis wrote: »
    Why do you say forget MS desktop applications? What's so bad about them?

    He probably wants you to accelerate your career. An MS Office will not have the same ROI as a CCNA/MCTS. For the effort you'd put in for the MOS cert, put in some more and get a cert that has way more market value. Example, which candidate would you hire? Bob with 6 months of experience fixing computers and a CCENT and MCTS or John with 6 months of experience fixing computers and an MOS cert. No brainer, I think. Still dont believe me? Do a search in dice.com/indeed.com or whatever you'd jump on to apply for jobs and do a keyword search with MOS and CCNA.

    Why you should do certs?

    1. Help you do your current job better. (also equates to more money)
    2. Help you get your next job.

    Both of the above points are not 3-4 year goals, more like 6 months to a year.

    Stick with Turgon's advice and you cant go wrong, the guy's a sage. Dive into the CCENT/CCNA or the MCTS track.
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

    Blog >> http://virtual10.com
  • WafflesAndRootbeerWafflesAndRootbeer Member Posts: 555
    Armymanis wrote: »
    Why do you say forget MS desktop applications? What's so bad about them?

    They are irrelevant to IT jobs. The desktop app certs are all for resume padding and are intended for office workers. I don't know why he even mentioned them since you would not be studying for those anyway unless he's referring to something else and misused the term.
  • ArmymanisArmymanis Member Posts: 304
    Alright thanks.
  • itdaddyitdaddy Senior Member Member Posts: 2,089 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Agreed with Turgon

    I recently hired 2 IT guys and both are great at scripting and programming.
    I want people who can learn, and finish something. Both guys are college guys. One has finished his BS and the other is finishing his schooling. I work with them because they love scripting and if an IT guy can't or doesn't like scripting I won't hire him. I am sorry for that but in technology today scripting is very essential...I had people with a lot of experience interview but they all didn't like scripting..this one girl I likedicon_cool.gif since she was a programmer type but had no experience with hardware..she was the best out of all the guys. All the guys I interviewed didn't like scripting...so it depends on what you future employer is looking for...
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Turgon wrote: »
    CCNA. Forget MS desktop applications. Do it now.

    +1

    I have never been given a job because of my MOS expert title. It's given in certain positions that you have a certain level of compentance. Example supervisor or manager should know how to use Word, Outlook, Excel, and PowerPoint.

    I agree if you want to become a technologist go for the CCNA. It's a great marketable certification. To be honest in my opinion if I wanted to get into upper level technology it would be the one cert I would get. It has great respect.

    I've worked in several different environments and every single one respected the Cisco certifications. I've seen help desk guys get sucked up in month 3 into a networking position because of their CCNA. To be honest it's one of the only certifications I can honestly say has a great return on it.
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