Windows and Linux Networking

Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
Anyone want to share any decent books they have on windows and or linux networking? I don't care if they are cert oriented or not but I would prefer that they are at least CCNA level of depth.

Comments

  • hiddenknight821hiddenknight821 Member Posts: 1,209 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I think you might be looking for socket programming books. Do a search on that, and see what comes up.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    My only issue is I don't want them to be to programming oriented since I am not a dev.
  • hiddenknight821hiddenknight821 Member Posts: 1,209 ■■■■■□□□□□
    My only issue is I don't want them to be to programming oriented since I am not a dev.

    Honestly, I have no idea what exactly you are asking, but socket programming has pretty good stuff for someone that wants to understand networking in depth. Are you looking for network configuration guides like how to do the ifconfig, iptables, and configure route on linux boxes?
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298
    Have you seen Windows Server 2008 TCP/IP Protocols and Services?
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Have you seen Windows Server 2008 TCP/IP Protocols and Services?


    No I have not. googling now. Nice 8 bucks used. Is this book still decent for R2?
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298
    Yes, I imagine this stuff does not change very much very often.
  • demonfurbiedemonfurbie Member Posts: 1,819
    ya may want to look up the linux cookbook, there is one for networking


    edit: http://www.amazon.com/Linux-Networking-Cookbook-Carla-Schroder/dp/0596102488/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1314296742&sr=8-4
    wgu undergrad: done ... woot!!
    WGU MS IT Management: done ... double woot :cheers:
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I saw that one. I am just not sure as it is a little dated.
  • demonfurbiedemonfurbie Member Posts: 1,819
    its not too dated alot of the info in there is still used with just new versions and the commands are still the same across the versions
    wgu undergrad: done ... woot!!
    WGU MS IT Management: done ... double woot :cheers:
  • EveryoneEveryone Member Posts: 1,661
    Play around with joining a Linux box to a 2008 R2 AD domain, you'll learn a lot about networking Windows and Linux together in the process.

    If you want to get really fun with it, setup something like an OpenFire server for Kerberos authentication with the AD domain.

    Setting up and accessing some file shares on both Windows and Linux is a good learning experience too.

    I still want to get around to doing the opposite, creating a Samba based Linux AD domain controller, and joining some Windows boxes to it.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Everyone wrote: »
    I still want to get around to doing the opposite, creating a Samba based Linux AD domain controller, and joining some Windows boxes to it.

    I'm probably more along that lines to. I was more looking for stuff like packet information and such.
  • qwertyiopqwertyiop Member Posts: 725 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Everyone wrote: »
    Play around with joining a Linux box to a 2008 R2 AD domain, you'll learn a lot about networking Windows and Linux together in the process.

    If you want to get really fun with it, setup something like an OpenFire server for Kerberos authentication with the AD domain.

    Setting up and accessing some file shares on both Windows and Linux is a good learning experience too.

    I still want to get around to doing the opposite, creating a Samba based Linux AD domain controller, and joining some Windows boxes to it.

    I agree, I learnt alot about linux, AD networking/authentication over the past year and a half by creating multiple *nix servers (FreeBSD, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and CentOS) and getting them to both authenticate and enforce windows permissions with SAMBA.
    I even created a shell script that automates the whole process on a Ubuntu system.
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298
    qwertyiop wrote: »
    I agree, I learnt alot about linux, AD networking/authentication over the past year and a half by creating multiple *nix servers (FreeBSD, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and CentOS) and getting them to both authenticate and enforce windows permissions with SAMBA.
    I even created a shell script that automates the whole process on a Ubuntu system.
    You guys are missing the point. He's looking for networking internals (how OS and applications actually process the PDUs) - not practical how to information.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    You guys are missing the point. He's looking for networking internals (how OS and applications actually process the PDUs) - not practical how to information.


    This^ ^

    I mean I know I can lab this stuff up but I'd like to know what's going on under the hood. This is more for security knowledge not "network engineering" knowledge (ie i'd like to know more about the packets in wireshark).
  • EveryoneEveryone Member Posts: 1,661
    So run Wireshark while doing what I suggested, and analyze the captures. ;)
  • RobertKaucherRobertKaucher Member Posts: 4,298
    Everyone wrote: »
    So run Wireshark while doing what I suggested, and analyze the captures. ;)

    Interpreting this sort of information is exceptionally difficult without some guidance. If I handed you a ProcMon capture from booting a PC and asked you to explain to me line by line what was going on in the start up process on the PC it would likely be very hard except in the most general terms.

    IMO, BR's best bet from a Linux perspective is likely going to be getting to understand enough about C++/C that he can get an understanding from the socket programming books HiddenKnight mentioned. If you really want to understand the internals of any OS you cannot avoid some aspect of programming. You just cannot do it becuase what you are talking about is drivers and how they interact with very low level code in the kernel, etc.

    Saying you don't want to learn anything "dev oriented" when it comes to OS networking internals is like saying you want to learn about the details of how cars run but you don't want to know about the physics of the internal combustion engine because you aren't an engineer. It's just not possible...

    You don't need to know enough to actually write device drivers or kernel code to understand.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Interpreting this sort of information is exceptionally difficult without some guidance. If I handed you a ProcMon capture from booting a PC and asked you to explain to me line by line what was going on in the start up process on the PC it would likely be very hard except in the most general terms.

    IMO, BR's best bet from a Linux perspective is likely going to be getting to understand enough about C++/C that he can get an understanding from the socket programming books HiddenKnight mentioned. If you really want to understand the internals of any OS you cannot avoid some aspect of programming. You just cannot do it becuase what you are talking about is drivers and how they interact with very low level code in the kernel, etc.

    Saying you don't want to learn anything "dev oriented" when it comes to OS networking internals is like saying you want to learn about the details of how cars run but you don't want to know about the physics of the internal combustion engine because you aren't an engineer. It's just not possible...

    You don't need to know enough to actually write device drivers or kernel code to understand.

    You are probably right. I just didn't want to do that just yet because I have a lot of other things on my plate. But I guess I'll have to take it one bite at a time.
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