Study Note Taking

KrisAKrisA Posts: 142Member
I find myself basically plagiarizing items into my notebook. What is an effective way of doing this, without consuming a lot of time? I thought about writing basic information with a reference page number, but I do not know how effective that would be as I intend on making flash cards in the future. I have also thought about typing up the notes as I see fit, as I can type faster than I can write.

Any useful tips or strategies you have picked up?
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Currently Reading
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Comments

  • EverlifeEverlife Posts: 253Member
    Hi Kris,

    I'm also in the process of studying for the CCNA, and I will agree I've found this a bit more difficult to prepare for because it is an entirely new command line to me. Here are some methods that I use:

    1) Records the notes in your own words, it will make more sense to you when you go back over them.
    2) Read the chapter fully once, read it again and take paper notes, consolidate your notes into electronic form, and finally do the labs and practice exams.
    3) Make up flash cards for commands and the easier concepts. Reference back to your electronic notes for the more robust concepts.
    4) Spend one hour or two each day reviewing your notes. Don't spend all the time making notes only to look at them the night before the exam.
    5) As time goes by, weed out the concepts and commands you have a firm grasp with and concentrate on the areas you're still having difficulty with.
    6) Lab, lab some more, and when you're finished with that, lab a few more times.

    Good luck!
  • ccnxjrccnxjr Posts: 304Member
    This is a little bit more challenging and can be frustrating at first but the results are wondrous!
    -After reading a section, close the book and write notes from memory.
    You'll find you remember a lot LESS than you thought....
    If you draw a blank, for the time being, write out a question but try to jot down as much as you can.
    There will probably be more questions than facts, which is expected.
    Crack open the book again, take a peek, add some missing details as bullet points then toss that piece of paper away.
    Close the book and then start over.

    This process is slow and can be frustrating, but soon you'll actually start learning.
    It's like exercising a muscle you never knew existed for the first time.
  • DevilryDevilry Posts: 668Member
    Everlife wrote: »
    Hi Kris,

    I'm also in the process of studying for the CCNA, and I will agree I've found this a bit more difficult to prepare for because it is an entirely new command line to me. Here are some methods that I use:

    1) Records the notes in your own words, it will make more sense to you when you go back over them.
    2) Read the chapter fully once, read it again and take paper notes, consolidate your notes into electronic form, and finally do the labs and practice exams.
    3) Make up flash cards for commands and the easier concepts. Reference back to your electronic notes for the more robust concepts.
    4) Spend one hour or two each day reviewing your notes. Don't spend all the time making notes only to look at them the night before the exam.
    5) As time goes by, weed out the concepts and commands you have a firm grasp with and concentrate on the areas you're still having difficulty with.
    6) Lab, lab some more, and when you're finished with that, lab a few more times.

    Good luck!

    That is a great method, I have to tweak mine to add a couple steps from yours.
  • KrisAKrisA Posts: 142Member
    ccnxjr wrote: »
    This is a little bit more challenging and can be frustrating at first but the results are wondrous!
    -After reading a section, close the book and write notes from memory.
    You'll find you remember a lot LESS than you thought....
    If you draw a blank, for the time being, write out a question but try to jot down as much as you can.
    There will probably be more questions than facts, which is expected.
    Crack open the book again, take a peek, add some missing details as bullet points then toss that piece of paper away.
    Close the book and then start over.

    This process is slow and can be frustrating, but soon you'll actually start learning.
    It's like exercising a muscle you never knew existed for the first time.

    From the outside looking in, this appears to be similar to the "training your brain"... Like your forcing your concentration on retaining the information rather than memorization. Which is exactly what I want, I do not want to become a bot. I am going to do my damnedest to incorporate this.

    Everlife wrote: »
    Hi Kris,

    I'm also in the process of studying for the CCNA, and I will agree I've found this a bit more difficult to prepare for because it is an entirely new command line to me. Here are some methods that I use:

    1) Records the notes in your own words, it will make more sense to you when you go back over them.
    2) Read the chapter fully once, read it again and take paper notes, consolidate your notes into electronic form, and finally do the labs and practice exams.
    3) Make up flash cards for commands and the easier concepts. Reference back to your electronic notes for the more robust concepts.
    4) Spend one hour or two each day reviewing your notes. Don't spend all the time making notes only to look at them the night before the exam.
    5) As time goes by, weed out the concepts and commands you have a firm grasp with and concentrate on the areas you're still having difficulty with.
    6) Lab, lab some more, and when you're finished with that, lab a few more times.

    Good luck!

    1) I do this, usually eliminating the fluff of the content. I even make up my own acronyms ( as if our industry needs any more)
    2) I Will be doing this. Reading ( Using ccnxjr advice) see what I did retain - reading/writing - typing should give a deep understand as your going over the material 3-4 times.
    3) I do this with key topics -
    4) I did this with CCENT - at least glancing at the, daily. Items I put asterisks by or Boxed in with bold
    5) Commands I am really good at. I can usually recall them off the top without thinking... This I found with the CCENT studies. Getting deeper into the sub commands I would expect the same results.
    6) I have the home lab up and running

    My study "habits" will need to change slowly to get a feel for them as well as getting them to the point of being a habit/ second nature.


    Thanks for the great responses. I know everyone study style will be different, but picking up little things can very well make the difference.
    WGU Progress BSIT:NA | Current Term:1 | Transfered To-Do In Progress Completed
    EWB2 BAC1 BBC1 TSV1 WFV1 CLC1 LAE1 LUT1 LAT1 AXV1 TTV1 INC1 INT1 TPV1 SST1 SSC1 GAC1 HHT1 TNV1 QLT1 BOV1 LET1 ORC1 IWC1 IWT1 MGC1 ABV1 AHV1 AJV1 TWA1 CPW2 BRV1
    Currently Reading
    Darril Book
  • pham0329pham0329 Posts: 556Member
    KrisA wrote: »
    I find myself basically plagiarizing items into my notebook.

    hahaha, I find myself doing the same thing. Sometimes I wonder why I take notes since I'm just writing what's in the book. The only reason I take notes anymore is because the act of writing stuff down helps me memorize it. I don't really take notes with the intent of reviewing it later.
  • method115method115 Posts: 85Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I don't take notes until after I've read the book and CBT and do the practice test that came with cisco book. This way I only write down things that I didn't remember from my original studying. Otherwise half my time studying would be spent writing down important stuff which is like on every page of a cisco press book.
  • xirtlookxirtlook Posts: 124Member
    Here's what I do.. I attack all my senses.

    I read it, I say it, I type exactly what I read, and then when I hand write my notes, I'm handwriting areas I'm weak on.
    Then I go crazy on the highlighter... to create visual Anchors.

    I'm a visual guy.. when it's test time, I think back, did I hear myself saying this.. I remember seeing this highlighted in Pink.
    I remember writing that, I remember typing this. Etc.

    Repetition is key for me. Any hands on (kinesthetic) is great for memory. So i try to do labs.

    the more you stress studying, the less you stress on the exam.

    takes alot longer, but I always overkill it.
    nerd power.
  • arionlyarionly Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I think I'm going to put your system or a facsimile there of in place. It's time to learn from those who have been successful 'cause I'm spinning my wheels. Current plan, is read, recite as I highlight, take paper & electronic notes, study my notes daily. Outline test objectives using key points. Create flash cards which focus back on test objectives, not sure if paper or electronic, probably both, and keep tweaking the system.
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