Why there is no power button on a cisco switch ?

GOZCUGOZCU Member Posts: 234
As mentioned at the title, why ? why and whyy ?

Or maybe I am thinking so narrow to understand the technology lies here. On a Catalyst 2950 switch, it is really hard to plug in and off the power cable every time. Wouldn't it be so easy if there was a power button like a cisco router ?

Enlighten me pls....

Comments

  • XtendXtend Member Posts: 27 ■□□□□□□□□□
    network equipment are not ment to be turned on/off so often like a PC or TV :) they are plugged and stay plugged for months/years without beeing turned of. That's why no on/off switch :)
  • alliasneoalliasneo Member Posts: 186
    something I have also wondered but don't know the answer too...
  • GOZCUGOZCU Member Posts: 234
    Xtend wrote: »
    network equipment are not ment to be turned on/off so often like a PC or TV :) they are plugged and stay plugged for months/years without beeing turned of. That's why no on/off switch :)

    Yes I see your point, but for a home lab purpose, it reflects as a pain or if you prefer to keep it open always, then an electric bill....
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    GOZCU wrote: »
    Yes I see your point, but for a home lab purpose, it reflects as a pain or if you prefer to keep it open always, then an electric bill....

    You can invest in a powerdown solution if it's a problem for homeuse. To be honest I used to just power off my whole rack whenever I wasn't using it and power the whole thing up when I needed it. In the field, the last thing you want is someone working in a cabinet and accidently turning the power off to a mission critical switch, which is why there isn't one.
  • nelnel Member Posts: 2,859 ■□□□□□□□□□
    ive always been under the impression its incase someone knocked it off by mistake.

    Our ASRs have a power button, but even then its tucked away at the back and covered so you cant knock it off too easy.
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
  • alxxalxx Member Posts: 755
    You could plug it in via a network pdu.

    A pdu is a power distribution unit, some are designed to go in the back of racks.
    network ones , allow you to log in via telnet or ssh and remotely power on and off and monitor power use.
    can plug them into software like big brother Download - Big Brother System and Network Monitor

    We use them to allow computer control of power cycling equipment between users and for hard resets.
    remotelabs.eng.uts.edu.au

    E.g hard reset for Labshare -
    Goals CCNA by dec 2013, CCNP by end of 2014
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,436 Admin
    To save manufacturing costs. Including a power switch and the additional wiring would add several dollars per switch in manufacturing costs. When 10K+ units are being manufactured each month, that's a considerable savings (not to mention one less part in inventory and one less part to break and RMA).

    The real question is, "Why did Cisco bother to put a power switch on their routers?"
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    nel wrote: »
    ive always been under the impression its incase someone knocked it off by mistake.

    Our ASRs have a power button, but even then its tucked away at the back and covered so you cant knock it off too easy.

    Pretty much.
  • SyntaxSyntax Member Posts: 61 ■■■□□□□□□□
    JDMurray wrote: »

    The real question is, "Why did Cisco bother to put a power switch on their routers?"

    I would assume because routers have modules/cards that require it to be powered down in order to install them safely, whereas most layer 2 switches (that I know of) do not. Granted, you could also unplug the router to power them down as well, but I guess in certain situations it works better to flip a switch.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,436 Admin
    Syntax wrote: »
    I would assume because routers have modules/cards that require it to be powered down in order to install them safely,
    Good point. The bigger switches that accept modules do have power switches. But still, power switch or not, I'd rather pull the AC cable before making hardware changes.
  • GOZCUGOZCU Member Posts: 234
    Syntax wrote: »
    I would assume because routers have modules/cards that require it to be powered down in order to install them safely, whereas most layer 2 switches (that I know of) do not. Granted, you could also unplug the router to power them down as well, but I guess in certain situations it works better to flip a switch.


    Actually after Turgon's answer, i was so curious about routers too. Just afraided of asking another meaningless question. On the other hand, thank you so much to all of you. I am convinced :)
  • NetwurkNetwurk Member Posts: 1,155 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Cisco always had power buttons on their hardware. But when they bought out Catalyst and their line of switches, lo and behold it turned out that Catalyst switches did not have power buttons. So Cisco carried on with this fine money-saving tradition. I've been involved with closet build projects. We did checks and double checks that all ports were up. You're more likely to knock a cable out of a port than you would be to flip a power toggle. So IMO it's both an inherited Catalyst tradition and a money-saving thing.

    :)
  • TesseracTTesseracT Member Posts: 167
    They don't seem to be too consistent with this sort of thing though do they?

    For example the ASA 5505 has no power switch while the 5510 does... modules can be installed in both
  • TrifidwTrifidw Member Posts: 281
    TesseracT wrote: »
    They don't seem to be too consistent with this sort of thing though do they?

    For example the ASA 5505 has no power switch while the 5510 does... modules can be installed in both

    5505 is a firewall with a switch on the back where as the 5510 has routed ports. Routers have a power switch.

    4XXX series switches and above have a power switch.
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Member Posts: 2,077 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I was thinking that since switches are more likely to be touched by end users and junior staff removing the switch removes a temptation... routers on the other hand might be more tucked away.
    -Daniel
  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Netwurk wrote: »
    Cisco always had power buttons on their hardware. But when they bought out Catalyst and their line of switches, lo and behold it turned out that Catalyst switches did not have power buttons. So Cisco carried on with this fine money-saving tradition. I've been involved with closet build projects. We did checks and double checks that all ports were up. You're more likely to knock a cable out of a port than you would be to flip a power toggle. So IMO it's both an inherited Catalyst tradition and a money-saving thing.

    :)

    My coworkers and I always wondered why switches were pretty much the only Cisco devices without a power switch. You can flip a switch to power off your production router that connects the HQ site to your MPLS network but you can't flip off a dinky Cisco 3550 access switch. Granted newer routers have redundant power supplies and all that good stuff (none of that RPS non-sense lol).
    My Cisco Blog Adventure: http://shawnmoorecisco.blogspot.com/

    Don't Forget to Add me on LinkedIn!
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/shawnrmoore
Sign In or Register to comment.