Associate degree and certification CCNA and CCNP

john55john55 Banned Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
I was wonder can i get a good job in IT as Networking egineering with Associate degree+ CCNA or CCNP. I just heard lot people told that i can even with or without any college degree. Thanks everyone in advance.
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Comments

  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Sure. But life is not so simple.

    While you can probably get an entry-level job off of CCNA alone, you have to work your way up to get real networking jobs. Anybody can study for an pass the CCNA. Organizations want to hire professionals to manage and maintain their networks, and that means experience.

    Yes, you can certainly do it without a college degree. If you want to go deep into networking specifically and stay there, then ultimately the college degree won't matter that much. That said, a degree does help, and I'd recommend you get a 4-year degree in Computer Science or an IT-related field (MIS, CIT, CIS, IT, IA, etc.).

    If IT is not your calling and you're just looking to get a well paying job without four-year degree, this is not a good path. No matter what, my recommendation is you get a four-year degree, even if you do it part-time and it takes you eight years.
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  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Experience is key here, more so than the degree. You can get an entry level job with those qualifications and work your way up.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • Brain_PowerBrain_Power Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 163
    Technical recruiters have told me that college degreees alone are not getting people jobs. So, I would put your CCNA as priority and work on your college degreee after you have completed the CCNA.
  • john55john55 Banned Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks a lot guys.
  • RoguetadhgRoguetadhg CompTIA A+, Network+. Member Posts: 2,489 ■■■■■■■■□□
    CCNA is something you can earn in two pieces by doing ICND1 and ICND2. You can study this while at school.
    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
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  • higherhohigherho Member Posts: 882
    Roguetadhg wrote: »
    CCNA is something you can earn in two pieces by doing ICND1 and ICND2. You can study this while at school.

    I agree with this statement. Having the degree is going to help open doors for you. Having all three credentials (degree, cert, and exp) will boost you even more.

    I had a friend who got his Network +, Security +, and CCNA while doing a 4 year degree at a technical school. He got a job pretty quickly when he graduated (he had a few internships for his experience).
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Member Posts: 4,024
    I only have an associates, and I work as a network engineer for one of the largest providers in the US.

    Now, that didn't happen overnight. I worked at jobs well below my abilities for a number of years in order to establish experience. I don't think a bachelors or masters would have made any difference, companies don't like to let you put your paws on the pipes until you've proven you don't break stuff (not alot, anyway. Everyone breaks stuff sooner or later)
  • matt333matt333 Senior Member Bay AreaMember Posts: 262 ■■■■□□□□□□
    thats what I am doing now.. it really sucks, but that what you have to do to get a good amount of experience
    Studying: Automating Everything, network API's, Python etc.. 
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  • pertpert Member Posts: 250
    You really need degrees, certs, and experience for any job above help desk. You can get away without one of those three in some cases if youre very strong in a certain area. Or if you're lucky. However, everyone forgets the simple fact that if you only have X and Y, and the other person applying has X,Y, and Z, then why would anyone pick you?

    I really feel that asking whether you can do alright without a degree, experience, or certs is like asking "Hey guys, I'm going white river rafting, do I need a boat, paddle, and a life jacket?"
  • Novalith478Novalith478 Member Posts: 151
    I was wondering this too. I am at school for an arts degree (we don't have IT degrees here in Canada, and since I suck at math, comp-sci wasn't an option), so I am going for that degree and getting certs. I have my A+ and am working on my CCNA and hopefully I'll be able to get some entry level jobs without an IT degree.

    Will it be enough?
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    For entry level work your attitude and aptitude will be more important than certifications. They will help of course, but aren't going to get you hired on their own. Same with the degree.

    Good luck!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Member Posts: 4,024
    pert wrote: »
    However, everyone forgets the simple fact that if you only have X and Y, and the other person applying has X,Y, and Z, then why would anyone pick you?

    The mistake you're making with this is in assuming X,Y,Z are equally weighted. If I've got a 20 year veteran with a long track record with good references, and obviously knows his stuff from the interview, but he's got no certs and graduated high school with a GED, I'm taking him over the guy who's got maybe 5 years of experience, an alphabet soup of certs, and a masters degree. (And don't forget there's a fourth factor - personality. You could be the smartest and most qualified guy in the field, but if you're a colossal dick, there are plenty of folks who will decide to pass on you)

    There's no magic recipe. It's all about your motivation, your aptitude, and your ability to sell yourself
  • Novalith478Novalith478 Member Posts: 151
    I really hope that's true. I'm not getting an IT related degree and I really don't want to end up with wasted money on certs and no job icon_sad.gif
  • Forsaken_GAForsaken_GA Member Posts: 4,024
    The vast majority of people in the states do not work in the field that their degree is in, so it's not like a degree pigeon holes you for the rest of your life.
  • Novalith478Novalith478 Member Posts: 151
    That actually is really reassuring. Thanks!
  • higherhohigherho Member Posts: 882
    I only have an associates, and I work as a network engineer for one of the largest providers in the US.
    .snip...

    True, I don't think the degree's will help if your just going to be in the technical side of the fence for your whole career. Academia is a mixture of things. However, a degree / academia will develop an individual more on a broad scale than a certification can (of course its what you want to get out of it). For example, my B.S in IT had a lot of business with the minor in business on top of it (one thing a lot of IT people are lacking). Although, I do plan on going into management once I'm done on the technical side of the fence.
  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    One thing to keep in mind is that if you have no experience, a CCNP is useless to you. As has been stated in this thread and elsewhere, you need to get in the door and build your experience. Then, I'd worry about a CCNP. Start with the CCNA and the AS if you want, I started with an AS and CCENT and got a Tier I gig at an ISP. I finished my BS and am working on my CCNP and currently work as a Sr. Network Engineer.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • SponxSponx Member Posts: 161
    In my own experience a CCNA/CCNP with experience > An associates degree with a CCNA/CCNP.
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  • VAHokie56VAHokie56 Member Posts: 783
    The vast majority of people in the states do not work in the field that their degree is in, so it's not like a degree pigeon holes you for the rest of your life.

    I have a associates degree in Landscaping Turf Grass technology...pretty far from what I do as a net engineer icon_rolleyes.gif
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  • cmitchell_00cmitchell_00 Too many to name Member Posts: 247 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'll be honest because it's an combination of them all with experience, 4yr degree and certs can get you to the top of the food chain with time. I heard it for years get the Degree and certs and you'll get paid with the best job since you have the experience already. However, being on both sides of the fence tech and management it depends on how you sell yourself in the interview. If and when you get in and you are a doer you'll get to the mountain top but, keep in mind a I.T. "A" hole or prick will place you on the streets. We like people who are open minded and willing to grow etc. (i.e. team players); not pricks. The objective is to get the job done with qualified folk but, if you aren't personable and a trainable person is out there guess who gets the job. The old days of the "know it all's and bad attitudes" seems to be done with it's more about good customer service people who can become solid with the field experience, degree's and certs. (Just my opinion)
  • gdeusthewhizkidgdeusthewhizkid Member Posts: 289
    I got in IT with just a technical diploma in computer repair and no certs. It can happen just it was hard as hell.. Im now looking to get into a network admin position after 7 years as a support specialist. Im finding out certs and degree are needed to move up though.
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  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Member Posts: 1,899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Its possible to go places without a degree but it would just be more difficult. I suggest that you find internships through your school or Job Search | one search. all jobs. Indeed.com to build experience.
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  • gdeusthewhizkidgdeusthewhizkid Member Posts: 289
    I really hope that's true. I'm not getting an IT related degree and I really don't want to end up with wasted money on certs and no job icon_sad.gif

    sir you definately need certs if you dont have a IT related degree...
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  • erpadminerpadmin Member Posts: 4,165
    sir you definately need certs if you dont have a IT related degree...

    No, you don't...I was able to break into IT with a HS diploma and a few (passed) college courses. Certs are not a magicial, golden ticket that will get someone a job sans [without] experience. Aptitude and personality are key...at least in my experience.

    I don't recommend anyone going that route today, but way back when, it was a lot easier to do. The only reason I went back to school was so that I could break into IT management.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Its possible to go places without a degree but it would just be more difficult. I suggest that you find internships through your school or Job Search | one search. all jobs. Indeed.com to build experience.
    A degree is a nice way to pay one's dues and jump past the help desk. There are also many roles where a degree is either required or very desireable.
  • gdeusthewhizkidgdeusthewhizkid Member Posts: 289
    erpadmin wrote: »
    No, you don't...I was able to break into IT with a HS diploma and a few (passed) college courses. Certs are not a magicial, golden ticket that will get someone a job sans [without] experience. Aptitude and personality are key...at least in my experience.

    I don't recommend anyone going that route today, but way back when, it was a lot easier to do. The only reason I went back to school was so that I could break into IT management.

    you already have your degree sir.. from where?. IT management is definately something on my radar. Networking and IT management. THose the most things I am interested in as far as IT.
    WGU Progress: Progress | Completed | Start Date: 9/1/2012 B.S. Network Management & Design
    Courses Transferred in: BBC1 LAE1 QBT1 IWC1 IWT1 DHV1 CSV1 CWV1 CRV1 DEV1 - 28 cu :roll:
    Down: AXV1 CPV1 WFV1 CLC1

    Technical Diploma from Lincoln Tech.
  • erpadminerpadmin Member Posts: 4,165
    you already have you degree sir.. from where. IT management is definately something on my radar. Networking and IT management. THose the most things I am interested in as far as IT.

    The WGU degree was earned 1/18/2012. :) I started IT (professionally) on 6/1997, two years after I graduated high school and while I was a college student (at that point getting drunk and partying.) My first certs were A+ and Network+ which was then earned on November & December 2005, 8 years after I was already in IT. At that time, I was already into systems and ERP administration, but wanted a MCSA and MCSE. Then I got the job I'm currently at now, and that went to the wayside. That's not counting the 6 years prior of just PC hobbying which lead into a IT career [by accident, mind you.] I never believed I would actually be doing IT work as a career...but such is life. :)

    The certs I have since received were pretty much because of WGU. That's why I'm a big proponent of aptitude, and not (necessarily) certs.
  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Associates and just my CCNA:Voice here, should be breaking the six fig range with a few more years experience.
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  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    A degree is a nice way to pay one's dues and jump past the help desk. There are also many roles where a degree is either required or very desireable.

    A degree will not guarantee a person to skip past working on a helpdesk. Sure, you may not (if lucky) start as a password reset monkey helpdesk person, but the chances of skipping the entry level is much harder now than it was in the past.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I remember the days of a password reset ninja. How easy life was then. It was either a reset or punt. Just kidding I took my job serious, in fact I lost money due to the fact I didn't hit my call metrics because I was solving incidents. I used to give the guys and gals grief about answering more calls than closing incidents. I said if you answer more calls than fixing problems you are a CSR, if you fixed more problems than answered calls you were a tech. I was of course playing around.
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