Is CompTIA/LPI worth the money or can I skip to RHCSA?

I know I would learn something being a *nix noob by taking either test, but would it be a good use of my money to take the CompTIA/LPI first or just start working on the RHCSA? My interest is in Redhat and I want to work with that distro, but I’ve heard that the RHCX exams are more difficult because of the nature of the performance based exam. So while I’d learn something from the CompTIA/LPI test frankly I’m tired of paying for tests that really aren’t going to have an impact on my resume. I mean I could spend that money on the books and study at home.

My experience in Linux is I helped manage some six CentOS boxes at my last job, syslog, asterisk, etc. I also worked with the NetApp’s and Xenserver installation so I’m not afraid of the command line. Worked there for about 2 and a half years. I have been running Fedora as my primary OS on both desktop and laptop at home for over a year and a half with no real issues.

Also is Fedora/CentOS going to be similar enough to take the RHCX exams, or should I look at trying to find an official copy?

Comments

  • AceRimmerAceRimmer Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 41 ■■□□□□□□□□
    pwjohnston wrote: »
    My experience in Linux is I helped manage some six CentOS boxes at my last job, syslog, asterisk, etc. I also worked with the NetApp’s and Xenserver installation so I’m not afraid of the command line. Worked there for about 2 and a half years. I have been running Fedora as my primary OS on both desktop and laptop at home for over a year and a half with no real issues.
    That's enough to go strait for RHCSA
    Also is Fedora/CentOS going to be similar enough to take the RHCX exams, or should I look at trying to find an official copy?
    Don't use Fedora, it's technologically more advanced then RHEL6 (RHEL6 is based on Fedora12/13).
    CentOS 6, Scientific Linux 6, RHEL 6 server are OK. Any minor version.
  • pwjohnstonpwjohnston Member Posts: 441
    AceRimmer wrote: »
    Don't use Fedora, it's technologically more advanced then RHEL6 (RHEL6 is based on Fedora12/13).
    CentOS 6, Scientific Linux 6, RHEL 6 server are OK. Any minor version.

    Wow, that far behind? That's ok, I have plenty of space to put up VMs in Virtualbox. Thanks.
  • lordylordy Member Posts: 632 ■■■■□□□□□□
    With 2+ years of real server admin experience I don't think should bother with LPI.

    Download some CentOS or Scientific Linux 6.x and play with it. This is the platform you will be tested on. Good Luck!
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Based on your experience, heading down the path to RHCSA, (and possibly RHCE afterwards,) probably makes the most sense since CentOS is, for all intents and purposes, Red Hat Enterprise Linux without all the Red Hat branding. You should have little trouble picking up a book or two to prepare and start labbing.

    The other consideration is that the Linux+/LPIC-1 tests get you started on a slightly different path, but one that's vendor-neutral. While LPIC-1 isn't nearly an equivalent for RHCSA, LPIC-2 certainly is, and LPIC-3 level knowledge puts in you in roughly the same seniority-bracket as the RHCE cert would. Not to mention that you're getting started down a path for Novell certification as well, in earning your Linux+.

    The only real caveat here is that, while LPI's certs are vendor-neutral and give you a broader perspective on open-source software, Red Hat's certs are far more well-known and sought-after. So I suppose that the RHCSA path still looks to be a better choice for you than Linux+. . . unless, of course, you decide to both.

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  • pwjohnstonpwjohnston Member Posts: 441
    Slowhand wrote: »
    The only real caveat here is that, while LPI's certs are vendor-neutral and give you a broader perspective on open-source software, Red Hat's certs are far more well-known and sought-after.

    Ya, I actually have been using linux a lot longer than what I said, but I played the let's try this distro game and never really stuck with it long enough to learn a lot. Two years ago I decided to pick one and stick with it and that's why I went with RedHat. I just feel like it's well known among the recruiters and if you really know one distro well, would it really be that difficult to switch?

    Thanks for the input guys. I didn't know the LPI geared toward Novell in the higher levels. Not that I want to knock SUSE, it's just not where I want to go.
  • onesaintonesaint Member Posts: 801
    pwjohnston wrote: »
    I just feel like it's well known among the recruiters and if you really know one distro well, would it really be that difficult to switch?

    It isn't too tough to jump around when your comfortable with one distro. The main difference being package management and file / tool locations. Same thing happens in major release versions pf the same distro though (things move around).

    I'd shoot for the RHCx exams. They'll get noticed more, as you noted.
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  • ChooseLifeChooseLife Member Posts: 941 ■■■■■■■□□□
    pwjohnston wrote: »
    My experience in Linux is I helped manage some six CentOS boxes at my last job, syslog, asterisk, etc. I also worked with the NetApp’s and Xenserver installation so I’m not afraid of the command line. Worked there for about 2 and a half years. I have been running Fedora as my primary OS on both desktop and laptop at home for over a year and a half with no real issues.
    You know, you got some good experience with Linux already. That coupled with the solid and rounded experience in other areas (based on your cert track - VCP, MCSE, CCNA) should give you enough to secure a consideration by many employers. Have you tried applying yet? To be honest, if you were in my area, I'd invite you for an interview for a mid-level Linux sysadmin role (with good working knowledge of VMware, Windows and Cisco). There must be companies with heterogeneous environments in NY that would just love your combination of skills and let you further develop Linux-fu....
    “You don’t become great by trying to be great. You become great by wanting to do something, and then doing it so hard that you become great in the process.” (c) xkcd #896

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  • antielvisantielvis Member Posts: 285 ■■■□□□□□□□
    pwjohnston wrote: »
    I know I would learn something being a *nix noob by taking either test, but would it be a good use of my money to take the CompTIA/LPI first or just start working on the RHCSA? My interest is in Redhat and I want to work with that distro, but I’ve heard that the RHCX exams are more difficult because of the nature of the performance based exam. So while I’d learn something from the CompTIA/LPI test frankly I’m tired of paying for tests that really aren’t going to have an impact on my resume. I mean I could spend that money on the books and study at home.

    My experience in Linux is I helped manage some six CentOS boxes at my last job, syslog, asterisk, etc. I also worked with the NetApp’s and Xenserver installation so I’m not afraid of the command line. Worked there for about 2 and a half years. I have been running Fedora as my primary OS on both desktop and laptop at home for over a year and a half with no real issues.

    Also is Fedora/CentOS going to be similar enough to take the RHCX exams, or should I look at trying to find an official copy?

    I was a former Linux administrator that has since come to the Windows side of the world (I know, boo hiss). My experience is that with Linux/UNIX, certifications aren't that important. I suspect the reason is that you simply can't brain **** your way through life as a Linux admin. The learning curve is very long. I'd also suggest that when applying for a job, it's VERY likely that HR is going to include a Linux/UNIX specialist in the job search. These folks are going to respect any certification.

    BTW, I believe that all certifications & education have some effect on your resume. You may just not see it. I don't buy the argument that some certifications are just "not worth it". Even the A+ has value. If you're managing a smaller network & you make decisions on hardware there is value to it. Personally, if I met a guy who had LPI3, That WOULD impress me.
  • YuckTheFankeesYuckTheFankees Member Posts: 1,281 ■■■■■□□□□□
    You can't brain **** for the Red Hat exams...
    antielvis wrote: »
    I was a former Linux administrator that has since come to the Windows side of the world (I know, boo hiss). My experience is that with Linux/UNIX, certifications aren't that important. I suspect the reason is that you simply can't brain **** your way through life as a Linux admin. The learning curve is very long. I'd also suggest that when applying for a job, it's VERY likely that HR is going to include a Linux/UNIX specialist in the job search. These folks are going to respect any certification.

    BTW, I believe that all certifications & education have some effect on your resume. You may just not see it. I don't buy the argument that some certifications are just "not worth it". Even the A+ has value. If you're managing a smaller network & you make decisions on hardware there is value to it. Personally, if I met a guy who had LPI3, That WOULD impress me.
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