Not able to run any routers in GNS3

JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
So I'm setting up GNS3 to replace Packet Tracer and I'm trying to point it to a Cisco IOS (3620).

When I drag and drop Router c3600 onto the middle pane, right click Configure, go to Slots. I'm not getting any FE interfaces, just the following:
NM-1FE-TX
NM-1D
NM-4E
NM-16 ESW 
NM-4T 


A question I have is that I have a ton of different IOS's, 3620 to be exact. Can I use these under the c3600?

icon_confused.gif:
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Comments

  • CodeBloxCodeBlox Member Posts: 1,363 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I currently use a 3660 image on the c3600 router and have not had any issues. There's usually two FE interfaces already on the router if you select the "Add a link" icon in the row of icons at the top of the page, just like in PT (sorta). As for the slots, those are the exact same options I've got in GNS3 and I've never had an issue. I use the NM-16 ESW for all the extra FE ports and to sorta pretend that I've got a switch. When you say that you're "not able to run any routers", what do you mean?
    Currently reading: Network Warrior, Unix Network Programming by Richard Stevens
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    What you're looking at are the network modules (NMs) you can place in the 3620.. those are many of the real-world options. The 3620 is more of a WAN router, so don't expect high port density or high-speed performance.

    The NM-1FE-TX is a 1-port FE module. The NM-4E is a 4-port Ethernet module.

    Technically, there's a 2-port FE module for the device that GNS3 doesn't support. The real 3620 also barely supports it. In the real world, you wouldn't expect to get anywhere near linerate performance. Fortunately, none of this really matters from the perspective of learning how the IOS commands or how the protocols function.
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    Sorry, it was late when I wrote this up and spent most of the day studying.

    I'm using the following directions from the GNS3 website here: http://cdnetworks-kr-2.dl.sourceforge.net/project/gns-3/GNS3/0.5/GNS3-0.5-tutorial.pdf

    I was expecting to be able to follow them to the "T".
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JockVSJock wrote: »
    I was expecting to be able to follow them to the "T".
    Ahh, in that case, you goofed when you didn't use the same HW/SW device the tutorial did. The port adapters on a 7200 are quite different than the network modules on a 3620. I have fond memories of c7200s. :)
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    Ah ok.

    I still have alot to learn here. I do have access to 7200 IOS, so I'll try those and report back the results.


    Also, I'm watching the CBT Nuggests demo on GNS3 and Jeremy has advised on downloading and installing Cisco image unpacker 0.1 binary for Windows (I'm using this under Win 7 Professional). I think that GNS3 does the uncompression of the image, however this make take up CPU/Memory resources and the Image unpacker helps with this process.

    Is my thinking correct here?

    thanks
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    JockVSJock wrote: »
    Jeremy has advised on downloading and installing Cisco image unpacker 0.1 binary for Windows (I'm using this under Win 7 Professional). I think that GNS3 does the uncompression of the image, however this make take up CPU/Memory resources and the Image unpacker helps with this process. Is my thinking correct here?
    ::shrug:: I don't spend time/money on optimizations unless there's a justification for them. I let GNS3 do the unpacking for me and I'm able to run several large topologies (12-17 devices) with no problems.

    CCNA and CCNP Route topologies are typically smaller than that.
  • bermovickbermovick Member Posts: 1,134 ■■■■□□□□□□
    JockVSJock wrote: »
    Ah ok.

    I still have alot to learn here. I do have access to 7200 IOS, so I'll try those and report back the results.


    Also, I'm watching the CBT Nuggests demo on GNS3 and Jeremy has advised on downloading and installing Cisco image unpacker 0.1 binary for Windows (I'm using this under Win 7 Professional). I think that GNS3 does the uncompression of the image, however this make take up CPU/Memory resources and the Image unpacker helps with this process.

    Is my thinking correct here?

    thanks

    From my understanding, it just takes longer to load since it has to decompress the image first. Not sure if it ends up using more memory in the long-run.

    Also I was able to decompress my 3725 image just using linux's unzip. Not sure if winzip/rar/ace(etc) would be able to as it complained about it being a corrupted zip (but decompressed it anyway)
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    I'm 1/2 way thru the pdf and got the sample three routers up and running and configured correctly.

    Have got to say GNS3 is VERY COOL, gonna start playing with this sucker every day, because I can run every router command on it.
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
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