Question in regards to CCIE

ratchokeratchoke ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hey guys, right now I'm studying for my CCNA and my goal is to eventually get a CCIE, I know a long road ahead of me!

Now which degree would be best to pair with a CCIE? Right now I'm looking into WGU Information Technology - Network Administration B.S. program. Would this complement the Cisco Certification route and help prepare me for real world applications? Or should I look into Computer Science or Network Engineering?

I'm trying to plan my career and education path, so I'm trying to get as much information as I can. Right now I just do basic tier 1 desktop support for a major internet provider.

My goals are to help design networks, troubleshoot, and maintain. Any opinions or suggestions?

Comments

  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran ■■■■■■■■□□ Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    ratchoke wrote: »
    Now which degree would be best to pair with a CCIE?

    Of those options, a Network Engineering degree would be the strongest pairing, a Computer Science degree would come in second, and A BS in IT would come in third. The quality of the degree is also a factor and you can easily check the national ranking online.

    If your high school record was strong, you may qualify for scholarships. The college experience can be fun, rewarding, and a good way to make connections.

    Meet co-eds, too. :p
  • nelnel ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 2,859Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    be careful, you may get yourself labelled as a "one trick pony" as they say. I myself have degrees in network engineering as well as my professional experience/certs. You should maybe consider another degree to complement your IT skills such as Business admin or project management degrees.
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
  • ratchokeratchoke ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    nel wrote: »
    be careful, you may get yourself labelled as a "one trick pony" as they say. I myself have degrees in network engineering as well as my professional experience/certs. You should maybe consider another degree to complement your IT skills such as Business admin or project management degrees.

    Like Management Information Systems? Or Information Technology Management?

    Am I able to get a B.S. in Information Technology and a M.S. in MIS? Not sure how that works lol.
  • nelnel ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 2,859Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    ratchoke wrote: »
    Like Management Information Systems? Or Information Technology Management?

    Am I able to get a B.S. in Information Technology and a M.S. in MIS? Not sure how that works lol.

    The degree's i mentioned were just examples. In the UK it is not unheard of to have different undergrad and postgrad degree's. Anyway, i what i meant was maybe consider something to complement your CCIE. For example, having good business and personal skills will help you at the top, as well as supplementing your technical skills. Being a whizz tech is one thing but many IT pro's struggle to engage with the business element of their career. In architecture it is important to be able to engage with the customer from a business perspective too - not just a technical aspect.
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
  • ratchokeratchoke ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    nel wrote: »
    The degree's i mentioned were just examples. In the UK it is not unheard of to have different undergrad and postgrad degree's. Anyway, i what i meant was maybe consider something to complement your CCIE. For example, having good business and personal skills will help you at the top, as well as supplementing your technical skills. Being a whizz tech is one thing but many IT pro's struggle to engage with the business element of their career. In architecture it is important to be able to engage with the customer from a business perspective too - not just a technical aspect.

    I see, thank you for advice, I will definitely take that into consideration. Luckily enough, most Management information technology MS programs require IT backround. So I think it will work out in my favor if I go the B.S. Information Technology, and MS in MIS.
  • MickQMickQ ■■■■□□□□□□ Posts: 628Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I guess one of the most important things other than the possibility of pigeon-holing yourself, as nel point out, is that you should look at studying something that you will enjoy. If you don't like it, you won't learn as much and you'll become disillousioned pretty quick.
  • ratchokeratchoke ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Of those options, a Network Engineering degree would be the strongest pairing, a Computer Science degree would come in second, and A BS in IT would come in third. The quality of the degree is also a factor and you can easily check the national ranking online.

    If your high school record was strong, you may qualify for scholarships. The college experience can be fun, rewarding, and a good way to make connections.

    Meet co-eds, too. :p

    What other options would you suggest so that I may take a gander at the courses offered? And I have been looking more into Computer Science more this last day since I've read the post. I think it makes more sense to become really familiar with different programming languages and overall basis for computers. I think it's also an advantage to have a degree that is more well-rounded in many different fields. That way if I choose to, for w/e reason, start coding instead, I'd already have the back-round. Furthermore, I can definitely see how learning languages will help with scripting for different types of task I may encounter while being a network administrator.

    I'm looking into programs that can be done online and campus or 100% online. Mostly because I have financial responsibilities and I need to work full time.

    Not going to school full-time when I had the means (financial support, ability to qualify for fasfa ect) and doing the whole dorm room buzz thing is definitely one of my biggest regrest lol. Although, I always spent many days at Sacstate and SJSU partying because of friends who went there. But oh well, I had fun partying and making money at the time - we are we are because of what we've done after-all.
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