What are the foreign languages those should learn by a Networking professional?

shrikantpokharkarshrikantpokharkar Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi friends,
I am a CCNP(R&S) with 8 years of exp. , i wanna learn foreign language which will help me in developing my career in abroad. So could you please let me know which are the countries requires networking professionals. So that i can learn their language and have an added advantage.:)
Thanks & regards,
Shrikant
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Comments

  • EssendonEssendon Posts: 4,548Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Welcome to the forums!

    Which country are you talking about? Honestly, improve your English and you'll be much better off.
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

    Blog >> http://virtual10.com
  • IvanjamIvanjam Posts: 978Member
    Essendon wrote: »
    Honestly, improve your English and you'll be much better off.

    Ouchicon_exclaim.gif icon_study.gif
    Fall 2014: Start MA in Mathematics [X]
    Fall 2016: Start PhD in Mathematics [X]
  • shrikantpokharkarshrikantpokharkar Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for a sincere reply....... I will definitely improve my english........ but sill i want to know the counties which are looking for good networking professionals
  • shrikantpokharkarshrikantpokharkar Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    i am big fan of yours sir by looking at your certification list........and still u want to achieve more......Inspirational
  • EssendonEssendon Posts: 4,548Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Plenty of companies are always looking for talented people but locals generally fulfill the demand, hence there's no need for foreign hires. Dont mean to offend at all mate, just telling you the fact. Two reasons why someone might hire a foreigner:

    - You're an absolute gun at something
    - They cant find locals that are good enough at that thing

    I know that Australia's brought in a number of people from around the world on lucrative contracts to design a country-wide fiber network. Something like this has never been undertaken in the country before, hence the need (temporary though) for foreign hires.
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

    Blog >> http://virtual10.com
  • shrikantpokharkarshrikantpokharkar Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank you sir......
  • IvanjamIvanjam Posts: 978Member
    Hey Ess - if I moved to Australia, would I have to learn Australian? I already know one word: Foster's is Australian for Beer!
    Fall 2014: Start MA in Mathematics [X]
    Fall 2016: Start PhD in Mathematics [X]
  • EssendonEssendon Posts: 4,548Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    If you like beer you already know Australian!
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

    Blog >> http://virtual10.com
  • Michael2Michael2 Posts: 305Member
    English. Everybody's got to know English. Maybe German, but English is definitely on top.
  • Master Of PuppetsMaster Of Puppets Posts: 1,210Member
    For you guys in the English-speaking countries, there may be no need to learn another one. However, for the others English is a must and anything on top of that is a bonus. I'm developing my German right now(thank God for Rammstein :D )
    Yes, I am a criminal. My crime is that of curiosity. My crime is that of judging people by what they say and think, not what they look like. My crime is that of outsmarting you, something that you will never forgive me for.
  • japanese french german russian :D
  • QHaloQHalo Posts: 1,488Member
    Surprised no one has mentioned Spanish. I guess it really depends where you want to work right?
  • gkcagkca Posts: 243Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Kalashnikov ;)
    "I needed a password with eight characters so I picked Snow White and the Seven Dwarves." (c) Nick Helm
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    QHalo wrote: »
    Surprised no one has mentioned Spanish. I guess it really depends where you want to work right?
    I haven't found any locales that pay well for tech skills and pay extra for speaking Spanish--that includes Texas, California, and parts of Central America. The only language I've seen increased pay for is Japanese.
  • MrAgentMrAgent Posts: 1,305Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I haven't found any locales that pay well for tech skills and pay extra for speaking Spanish--that includes Texas, California, and parts of Central America. The only language I've seen increased pay for is Japanese.

    The US Dept of State pays extra I believe if you are in the foreign service and you learn a new language at a certain level.
  • wes allenwes allen Posts: 540Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    While English is kinda the default tech language, knowing another one or two can't hurt. While local companies usually try to hire local people, many foreign companies either prefer or are required to hire their own citizens. For example many US companies hire US citizens to work in other countries, even though they cost more. If you want to learn something that might be useful, you might look to the BRIC countries. Since my MIL is Brazilian, I am going to try to learn some Brazilian Portuguese, as their economy is pretty strong right now, even if it isn't all the common outside Brazil.
  • kurosaki00kurosaki00 Posts: 973Member
    I know Spanish and it haven't done much really for me here in Indy.
    Maybe in other states.

    I agree English is the default tech language, I have friends from latin america and spain and they rarely mention IT terms in spanish.
    They sometimes just mention them in english but as if it was read in spanish lol
    "El Demark" or "Puedes darle ping a el circuit" lol.

    I guess if you lived in cali or FL spanish would be more useful.
    meh
  • d4nz1gd4nz1g Posts: 464Member
    I'm brazilian, and I'm planning to move to Ireland or New Zealand.

    IrishJobs.ie for jobs in Ireland. Search IrishJobs.ie for jobs in Ireland, Dublin, Cork and Galway.

    www.seek.co.nz

    Sometimes I check for some positions so I can motivate myself to work on my goals. :)
  • About7NarwhalAbout7Narwhal Posts: 761Member
    Essendon wrote: »
    If you like beer you already know Australian!

    Plus, I heard a dirty rumor that Australians don't actually drink Fosters!!!
  • EssendonEssendon Posts: 4,548Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Your right, Foster's is likely the most unloved beer of all. But the company that makes this beer also concocts other brews that outsell Foster's many times over. I have never actually seen anyone buy a slab (or even a 6-pack) of Foster's!
    NSX, NSX, more NSX..

    Blog >> http://virtual10.com
  • AhriakinAhriakin SupremeNetworkOverlord Posts: 1,800Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    @Essendon "If you like beer you already know Australian!"

    You mean displaced sunburnt Irish :).
    We responded to the Year 2000 issue with "Y2K" solutions...isn't this the kind of thinking that got us into trouble in the first place?
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,780Mod Mod
    kurosaki00 wrote: »
    I know Spanish and it haven't done much really for me here in Indy.
    Maybe in other states.

    I agree English is the default tech language, I have friends from latin america and spain and they rarely mention IT terms in spanish.
    They sometimes just mention them in english but as if it was read in spanish lol
    "El Demark" or "Puedes darle ping a el circuit" lol.

    I guess if you lived in cali or FL spanish would be more useful.

    Been there. Spanish is my native language. If you give me a Windows whatever in Spanish I wouldn't know what anything means right off the bat. It would take me some time to figure it out. Back home every time I touched a Spanish Windows version I felt like grabbing a pen and sticking it in my eye.

    I still remember the first time i saw the word "enrutador." It took me a solid 10 minutes to figure out they were talking about a router.
  • sratakhinsratakhin Posts: 818Member
    cyberguypr wrote: »
    I still remember the first time i saw the word "enrutador." It took me a solid 10 minutes to figure out they were talking about a router.
    It's even worse in Russian. They call it "marshrutizator". Try to pronounce it :)
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    I'm using marshrutizator from now on!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • gkcagkca Posts: 243Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm using marshrutizator from now on!
    Cool, then add brandmauer aka firewall and kommutator aka switch to your vocabulary :P
    PS We had a good saying back home: "The optimist learns English, the pessimist learns Chinese and the realist learns how to operate Kalashnikov" LOL
    "I needed a password with eight characters so I picked Snow White and the Seven Dwarves." (c) Nick Helm
  • kurosaki00kurosaki00 Posts: 973Member
    sratakhin wrote: »
    It's even worse in Russian. They call it "marshrutizator". Try to pronounce it :)

    I dont care, I'm naming my firstborn marshrutizator
    meh
  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Posts: 1,899Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    It depends on where you want to go. I would suggest a country that is easy for you to get to if you don't have a lot of time for visa stuffs. For example, getting a student visa to Russia by yourself is a pain. Because you have to contact the uni, sort out the arrangements then get the invitation sent to you. From there you have to fill out the visa application, take a blood test showing that you're HIV free, get a passport photo, buy your plane tickets, submit a copy of your itinerary along with some other documents.

    All of this stuff gotta go in the package to the visa company, if you decide to use a visa company. I couldn't tell you about tourist or business visa's because I haven't gotten to those yet.

    My suggestion to you is to check out indeed.com but for the country you would like to work in. For me it would be ru.indeed.com. Almost everything is in Russian but I might get lucky and catch something in English.

    The experience abroad is totally worth it.
    Booya!!
    WIP : | CISSP [2018] | CISA [2018] | CAPM [2018] | eCPPT [2018] | CRISC [2019] | TORFL (TRKI) B1 | Learning: | Russian | Farsi |
    *****You can fail a test a bunch of times but what matters is that if you fail to give up or not*****
  • PsoasmanPsoasman Senior Member Posts: 2,687Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    sratakhin wrote: »
    It's even worse in Russian. They call it "marshrutizator". Try to pronounce it :)

    My wife speaks fluent Russian, I am gonna to have her pronounce it for me.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Posts: 2,338Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I couldn't tell you about tourist or business visa's because I haven't gotten to those yet.
    As with most countries, you can get them in under a week, if you're willing to pay the coin.

    Getting to the U.S. can be trickier. It's sometimes taken a month for approval and some can't be approved.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    I would think learning a language that is used heavily in EMEA would be a decent idea if you wanted to move to that area. I've seen some top notch MIM degrees that really focus on that region. You could also learn Spanish or Portuguese and really make yourself marketable in the LATAM region. I think learning another language is huge. A friend of my went that route instead of certifications or a master degree. He simply hired tutors and used his time and resources to pen pal (on the web) and travel to other countries like Argentina, Colombia, Brazil, Peru, Mexico, and a few others. Not only has he reached the level of business level Spanish he has reached business level Portuguese (reading). He is in really good shape and gets a lot of job offers others just simply are not qualified for.
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