Background check a good sign?

Cpl.KlingerCpl.Klinger Member Posts: 159
I know I've probably got the worries for no reason, but no one in any industry is going to run a background check if they're not seriously interested, right? I had my second pone interview on Monday, and at the end they told me it might take a week or two to get an answer (they're hiring a bunch of people right now, so they're got a lot to do). I've been in retail management for a long time, and I'd never start a background check on someone I didn't intend to hire. Even though we have contracts for the background check, I never thought it was worth it to run checks on people I wasn't interested in. So should I cease my worrying?
"If you can't fix it, you don't own it"
"Great things have small beginnings."

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    I've never had a company run a background check and not got the job.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,875 Mod
    Correct. Those cost money so usually they do them right before extending an offer.
  • greenerekgreenerek Member Posts: 99 ■■□□□□□□□□
    agree, I think is a good sign ;), or bad if you have sth to hide...:)
    Per aspera ad astra-Seneka


  • Cpl.KlingerCpl.Klinger Member Posts: 159
    I have nothing to hide. The only thing they're going to find is a recent speeding ticket that I have already taken care of. The wait is just killing me, especially since my wife's job hunt went so quick (applied Friday, interviewed Tuesday, offer yesterday, starts next Wednesday). But then again, as a newly licensed RN, I knew her finding work would be simple.
    "If you can't fix it, you don't own it"
    "Great things have small beginnings."

  • tecketecke Member Posts: 52 ■■□□□□□□□□
    From my understanding a background check is usually a great sign. I believe you will get the job it is just a matter of waiting on the company to call.... I'm currently waiting on the results of a background and credit check for a new opportunity as well and it feels like it is taking foreverxforever so I empathize with you... Let us know when you get it!
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    The only thing they're going to find is a recent speeding ticket that I have already taken care of.
    I will +1 that once they actually pay for a criminal background check, it's very likely you've got the job. A recent speeding ticket would only be a concern for me if your on-the-clock duties would regularly include driving.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,171 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Relax, it's in the bag!
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • nkillgorenkillgore Member Posts: 67 ■■□□□□□□□□
    The federal goverment will. It doesn't cost them anything.
  • tom_dubtom_dub Member Posts: 59 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Background check = you got the job, pending you don't have any felonies or convictions or moral turpitude.
  • Cpl.KlingerCpl.Klinger Member Posts: 159
    I will +1 that once they actually pay for a criminal background check, it's very likely you've got the job. A recent speeding ticket would only be a concern for me if your on-the-clock duties would regularly include driving.

    No driving for this, it's work from home. I'm convincing myself more and more that I have it, just hard.
    "If you can't fix it, you don't own it"
    "Great things have small beginnings."

  • FloOzFloOz Member Posts: 1,614 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I know how you feel! Waiting for background checks to clear can be stressful even if you have never committed a felony.
  • HauntHaunt Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I have an interview next week and they told me they run thorough background-checks and all that jazz. So when a prospective employer runs a background-check on you, what kind of specific information can they find out? I mean, I know it checks for criminal history and stuff like that but can they find out very specific things like who all of your previous employers were and for how long you were employed there? For example, I got a job with the state last year (doing IT) but it turned out to be a very bad decision for me, the work was very mediocre and all the tech was extremely outdated so I quit after 1 week. Since I was only there for 1 week I obviously didn't mention that on my resume as it looks bad, but is that something that can be found out through a background-check?
  • instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    Haunt:

    Dependening upon the scope of the investigation, it may take even longer to investigate if they find out about a job that you previously held that you did not inform them of. Of course, I say this, based upon investigations for the Department of Defense. Some investigations are as simple as a criminal background check. In many cases, a credit check does occur. Depending upon the nature of a bankruptcy, it is still possible to have a clearance. Other investigations can get to the point where they want to know things about your surrounding family.

    Being honest is of primary importance, since it will show unfavorably on your trustworthiness if you "lie" for an investigation that is designed to check out how trustworthy you are. Now, if you didn't fill out a form, and they're only looking at your resume, that wouldn't appear to be the type of investigation to go that far into your background. A resume only shows what "you want to show" it doesn't show everything. So, I cannot see how a resume would be a "document of record" stating that this was your entire employment past. Additionally, the word "thorough" is relative. It may be thorough to do a 50-states check, local check, and/or national agency check, along with a credit agency check. I would argue that would not be as thorough as having investigators go out and independently confirm the information you submit in a form, and ask other people how they judge your trustworthiness.

    For example, national security investigations get to the point of asking for information that you probably would not freely divulge to a stranger.

    This form here gives a quick synopsis of the type of things you could get investigated for:
    http://www.opm.gov/forms/pdf_fill/sf86c.pdf (see page 2)

    You can go to this site to see the actual forms you'd fill out, depending on the extent of the investigation required:
    Standard Forms

    Hope this helps.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • HauntHaunt Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the info. I'm interviewing for a private company so I don't expect their checks to be as tough as government jobs. And now that I think about it, I worked for a financial institution after I quit working for the state and they didn't find anything about my employment with the state when they did my background check and their checks were supposed to be very deep and thorough and stuff since they're a financial institution. So I'll probably be okay with this new prospective employer not finding out about my 1 week stint with the state job.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Being honest is of primary importance, since it will show unfavorably on your trustworthiness if you "lie" for an investigation that is designed to check out how trustworthy you are. Now, if you didn't fill out a form, and they're only looking at your resume, that wouldn't appear to be the type of investigation to go that far into your background. A resume only shows what "you want to show"
    +1. As long as you have been honest, I wouldn't lose sleep over it.
  • Cpl.KlingerCpl.Klinger Member Posts: 159
    Well, background check is completed. Now just to wait the final answer....
    "If you can't fix it, you don't own it"
    "Great things have small beginnings."

  • HauntHaunt Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Hey all, have any of you ever been asked for a background check BEFORE you have interviewed? I got an interview coming up and they asked me to fill out a background check authorization form to take with me to the interview to turn in.

    Is this typical? I have only ever been asked to submit to a background check until after I was already offered the job. This isn't a problem for me, I was just wondering. This job that I'm interviewing for has been open for almost 2 months now so I'm wondering if maybe they want to fill the position as quickly as possible and want to expedite the process, maybe even perhaps because they think I'll be a good fit for the position? Haha, wishful thinking.
  • XyroXyro Member Posts: 623
    Haunt wrote: »
    Hey all, have any of you ever been asked for a background check BEFORE you have interviewed? I got an interview coming up and they asked me to fill out a background check authorization form to take with me to the interview to turn in.
    Yes, I have. I have even filled out those forms when even just submitting applications.
  • leefdaddyleefdaddy Member Posts: 405
    Well, background check is completed. Now just to wait the final answer....

    Be careful... verify it is a legit company. There are some scams out there that do things like this.
    Dustin Leefers
  • HauntHaunt Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Well I realized the obvious. Just because they asked me to bring a filled out background check form to my interview doesn't mean they'll actually spend the money to follow through with it.

    If they interview me and don't like me, they can scrap the background check and be done with it....
  • jimmyrobsjimmyrobs Member Posts: 1 ■■□□□□□□□□
    No reason to worry. Since background screenings cost money, organizations won't run them on anyone they don't intend to hire.
  • ansionnachclisteansionnachcliste Member Posts: 70 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Background checks are normally a good thing.

    However... I recently had 3 great interviews with one company and then a background check where they called two of my references.
    The feedback from the references was that it looks like I "have it in the bag".

    A week later I get an email and a call later saying that they chose me for the job but the company backed out.

    I guess that's my fault - Know the company, see if they know where they're going, if they have a plan and seem organised.
    I got the vibe that they were a little lost, although I was excited to try and push them further.
  • LonerVampLonerVamp OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, CCNA Cyber Ops, Sec+, Linux+, AWS SAA, CCSK Member Posts: 461 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Thread necro!

    Security Engineer/Analyst/Geek, Red & Blue Teams
    OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, CCNA Cyber Ops, Sec+, Linux+, AWS SA-A, CCSK
    2020 goals: AWS Security Specialty, AWAE or SLAE, CISSP-ISSAP?
  • Infosec_SamInfosec_Sam Security+, CCENT, ITIL Foundation, A+ Madison, WIAdmin Posts: 450 Admin
    Background checks are normally a good thing.

    However... I recently had 3 great interviews with one company and then a background check where they called two of my references.
    The feedback from the references was that it looks like I "have it in the bag".

    A week later I get an email and a call later saying that they chose me for the job but the company backed out.

    I guess that's my fault - Know the company, see if they know where they're going, if they have a plan and seem organised.
    I got the vibe that they were a little lost, although I was excited to try and push them further.
    That's odd - I wouldn't consider it to be your fault for not realizing they were going to back out of the deal. At some point, the employer needs to take responsibility for their actions! Either way, you probably dodged a bullet!
    Community Manager at Infosec!
    Who we are | What we do
Sign In or Register to comment.