Linux essentials before Linux+

Arod95Arod95 Posts: 216Member
Hello I was looking around the linux site to see the objectives that is needed to pass the linux+/LPI-1, and I stumbled on one of their tabs noticing they recently probably just started last year that they made a linux essentials certification for before LPI-1. I wondering if it was worth it to go for that first before linux+. I have no linux background whatsoever other than just installing in on a couple of externals,thumb drives, and some vms but I haven't the chance to actually learn anything. The exam is only $85. Just wanted to hear from a few other people think about that exam. Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • BryzeyBryzey Posts: 260Member
    I like you had no linux experience.
    I switched my main machine to linux and started studying linux+.

    I also brought a couple of reference books that people have recommended on this site because I don't have a Linux background.

    Linux bible and introduction to the command line. I plan on reading both when they arrive as part of my linux+ study. I expect these 2 reference materials along with a linux+ study guide that maps to the objectives and a cbt should be enough to get me across the line.

    I would recommend just going straight into the linux+
  • Arod95Arod95 Posts: 216Member
    Alright thats what I kind of thought because if I aim for something to small I'm going to hold myself back. I think I'll just do it that way. Once I make my first computer build I'll make it a linux machine and just study. It will probably be later though so let me know how that goes for you. Good luck! And thanks for the advice it really helped me realize linux essentials is too much of an entry level. Also I was wondering what linux study guide where you going to use?
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    There actually is a book named Linux Essentials.
    Linux Essentials: Roderick W. Smith: 9781118106792: Amazon.com: Books

    In a previous thread I created a few months back, it was suggested that I read that book along with The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction in addition to some labbing to get acquainted w/ Linux.

    You might not need to wait to build a new comp to get beginner Linux exp. For labbing, I simply used VirtualBox on my laptop. (I have a Macbook Air - not nearly a beefy machine)
    Goals for 2018:
    Certs: RHCSA, LFCS: Ubuntu, CNCF CKA, CNCF CKAD | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer, AWS Solutions Architect Pro, AWS Certified Security Specialist, GCP Professional Cloud Architect
    Learn: Terraform, Kubernetes, Prometheus & Golang | Improve: Docker, Python Programming
    To-do | In Progress | Completed
  • Arod95Arod95 Posts: 216Member
    @doubleNNs thanks for the info.and I've tried that before on my current laptop doesn't have enough power for me to run vms( even just one) smoothly without it crashing on me so I was gonna build a computer for more power and to run vms (multiple at the same time) smoothly. but either way I'm going to wait because I'm working on cwna and ccna because those are requirements for the courses I'm taking at school.
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Try Debian 6. For some reason, that was the only Linux OS that ran smoothly for me on my laptop using VirtualBox.
    Honestly, I know absolutely nothing about virtualization, but I've been able to get Debian 6 and XP working - even both at the same time - altho haven't had much success w/ other OSes.
    Goals for 2018:
    Certs: RHCSA, LFCS: Ubuntu, CNCF CKA, CNCF CKAD | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer, AWS Solutions Architect Pro, AWS Certified Security Specialist, GCP Professional Cloud Architect
    Learn: Terraform, Kubernetes, Prometheus & Golang | Improve: Docker, Python Programming
    To-do | In Progress | Completed
  • BryzeyBryzey Posts: 260Member
    Arod95 wrote: »
    Also I was wondering what linux study guide where you going to use?

    This is the study guide I plan to use that maps to the exam objectives:

    CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: Exams LX0-101 and LX0-102: Roderick W. Smith: 9781118531747: Amazon.com: Books

    This is the two reference books I plan to buy to help me get up to scratch with Linux:

    Linux Bible: Christopher Negus, Christine Bresnahan: 9781118218549: Amazon.com: Books

    And

    Amazon.com: The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction (9781593273897): William E. Shotts Jr.: Books

    For the video training I have:

    -Testout.

    But other alternatives that I recommend are Trainsignal and CBT Nuggets.

    Also for some free materials you have:

    -http://nixsrv.com/llthw
    -http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LPI_Linux_Certification
    -http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-lpic1-v3-map/index.html
    -http://www.linuxtopia.org/
    -http://www.professormesser.com/linux-plus/linux-training-videos/


    Hopefully that helps.
  • Arod95Arod95 Posts: 216Member
    I'll probably start with that and later move up. Thanks for the reply
  • Arod95Arod95 Posts: 216Member
    @Bryzey thanks for the info I'll definitely check those books out.
  • lsud00dlsud00d Posts: 1,571Member
    DoubleNNs wrote: »
    Try Debian 6. For some reason, that was the only Linux OS that ran smoothly for me on my laptop using VirtualBox.
    Honestly, I know absolutely nothing about virtualization, but I've been able to get Debian 6 and XP working - even both at the same time - altho haven't had much success w/ other OSes.

    Not to threadjack but what kind of issues were you having? It must be something with your underlying hardware...I've had no issues running Ubuntu, Fedora, CentOS, Debian, OpenSUSE, etc in VM's on my laptop.
  • Arod95Arod95 Posts: 216Member
    to add on how much ram did you guys have on your laptops? processor speed/ amount of cores? @lsud00d @DoubleNNs
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    @ lsud00d - Just lag. Sometimes to the point of making the OS completely unusable.
    I tried Fedora, Ubuntu, CentOS, and Debian. Debian was the only 1 that had no lag what-so-ever. So I uninstalled the rest to free up the precious space on my 120 GB drive.

    Edit: I have 1.7 GHz i5 and 4 GB. I think I'd allocate 1024 MB mem to each VM in Virtualbox.
    Goals for 2018:
    Certs: RHCSA, LFCS: Ubuntu, CNCF CKA, CNCF CKAD | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer, AWS Solutions Architect Pro, AWS Certified Security Specialist, GCP Professional Cloud Architect
    Learn: Terraform, Kubernetes, Prometheus & Golang | Improve: Docker, Python Programming
    To-do | In Progress | Completed
  • lsud00dlsud00d Posts: 1,571Member
    That's odd man, I've got a few but even on my older Lenovo (dual core Celeron @ 1.8ghz, 4gb RAM), I was able to run Ubuntu and CentOS without much issue.

    Mainly VM's are RAM/core hungry and you have to play nicely with the host OS as @Arod95 is indicating. True it does help to have a slimmed down *nix OS...also thinking back on it I was working mostly in the command line. Hmmm.
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I was entirely in the command line and sometimes google chrome. Still lagged.
    I might retry it in the future and see if I get different results. But for now I'm working on Cisco and all I need is a VM of XP for Packet Tracer.
    Goals for 2018:
    Certs: RHCSA, LFCS: Ubuntu, CNCF CKA, CNCF CKAD | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer, AWS Solutions Architect Pro, AWS Certified Security Specialist, GCP Professional Cloud Architect
    Learn: Terraform, Kubernetes, Prometheus & Golang | Improve: Docker, Python Programming
    To-do | In Progress | Completed
  • twodogs62twodogs62 Posts: 393Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I have about 6 years of Linux experience.
    i like the Linux essential book. I find it interesting reading.
    i think a good overview to Linux and a necessary level to learning Linux well.
    Now that this test is available thru Vue testing, I'm considering taking test at the end of the year.

    i also like the ore illy pocket Linux book. I think it is like $10.
    filled with basics to get you to speed quickly.

    In addition labbing is critical.
  • mgmguy1mgmguy1 Senior Member PA Posts: 461Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Bryzey wrote: »


    Bryzey,
    Thanks for the info. I playing with Linux for a few years but looking to learn more about it. There are more then a few Linux Admin jobs in my area and I have been a big Fan of Gentoo and Fedora Linux but I am still a beginner in teams of skill Level. I need to learn more. I just installed Vitrual Box on my new Laptop and installed Fedora 19. With these links I shall try to sink my teeth into the material.
    "A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

    Fats Domino
  • BryzeyBryzey Posts: 260Member
    Good stuff. Just a tip. If you check out the study material but can't find a configuration file or location that gets mentioned it might be worth having an old version of fedora in a vm also. Eg fedora 12-14.
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