Which holds more weight, CompTIA or Microsoft certs?

phdillardphdillard Member Posts: 86 ■■□□□□□□□□
I'm just curious. For example, the CompTIA roadmap shows Server+ as being more advanced than the MTA 98-365 or Network+ being better than the MTA 98-366. Do you feel this is accurate? I wonder because the Mircosoft exams are cheaper than CompTIA and if they hold the same weight when trying to get a job, why pay the higher price?

Comments

  • UniqueAgEnTUniqueAgEnT Member Posts: 102
    In general, Microsoft certs will be more valueable than CompTIA. Server+ will not be as useful as Server 2008 or 2012 certs.

    Network+ might help you get into a helpdesk role, but CCNA or other vendor certifications will be needed for more networking specific roles.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    Microsoft.

    CompTIA tend to be more "entry-level" and vendor-nonspecific. CompTIAs tend to deal with more entry-level theory and non-specifics while MS certs tend to explain configuration and some light troubleshooting. I didn't notice as much theory in MS certs because they assume you to understand the idea of core topics like DNS, DHCP, etc going into it.
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  • srabieesrabiee Member Posts: 1,231 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Comparing CompTIA certs to MTA certs...I really don't know. I've always ignored MTA certs and considered them to be more student/academic oriented. For that reason I would have to say CompTIA.

    Now if you're comparing CompTIA to MCTS/MCSA, then MCSA definitely wins. MCITP/MCSE, no contest.

    Of course as someone else mentioned, CompTIA is vendor-neutral, and Microsoft certs deal with Microsoft products and technologies. So all of these comparisons are still a bit "apples and oranges."
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  • phdillardphdillard Member Posts: 86 ■■□□□□□□□□
    yeah I'm just trying to figure out if the entry level stuff like MTAs are on par with CompTIA, which is fairly entry level as well, should I just save myself the money by taking the MTAs as a placeholder until I can work up to something more substantial.
  • sratakhinsratakhin Member Posts: 818
    MCP/MCTS > Network+ > MTA
  • NinjaBoyNinjaBoy Member Posts: 968
    To be honest, it's horses for courses...

    Which holds more weight, well it depends on the job/organisation itself....

    You get or go for a job that works with Linux or Apple... Well a Microsoft cert won't help you there. Or if you're a server hardware engineer, again a MS cert won't help you.

    Saying that if you're working in a MS environment, then Microsoft certs would be a big advantage over Comptia certs.

    My organisation is both a Comptia and Microsoft partner, so for us, having any would be beneficial. Having both is better.
    phdillard wrote: »
    I'm just curious. For example, the CompTIA roadmap shows Server+ as being more advanced than the MTA 98-365 or Network+ being better than the MTA 98-366. Do you feel this is accurate?

    Having done both, I can say that you are comparing apples and oranges. The Server+ tends to focus more on the hardware, whereas the MTA purely focuses on the basics of the server software. They would compliment each other and I would say that they are more or less on the same level.
    phdillard wrote: »
    I wonder because the Mircosoft exams are cheaper than CompTIA and if they hold the same weight when trying to get a job, why pay the higher price?

    One thing to consider is that the Server+ cert is for life (this may change, but for now it is), the MTAs are renewable every 5 years.
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Member Posts: 2,013 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I think the MTAs are below the CompTIAs, whereas the CompTIAs are below all the other Microsoft exams.

    At the same time, the more advamced certs are still cheaper than the CompTIAs. If money is tight, maybe try to do a quick scan thru of the CompTIA materials (professormessor.com is a good free resource) then jump right into the higher level certs, such as MCSA or CCNA. Not only will it be cheaper than getting a CompTIA exam, but as long as you can handle the material, they'll allow you to advance much quicker and give better ROI in the long run.

    I think the CompTIAs are great for getting your foot in the door. But at least personally, now that my foot is in, they aren't doing much to help me further.
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  • sleepingturtlesleepingturtle Member Posts: 10 ■□□□□□□□□□
    CompTIA are definitely great to get your foot in the door. The biggest issue is experience. If you are in a smaller area, the lack of experience isn't as detrimental as in a metropolitan area.
  • CoolMikeCoolMike Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    CompTIA are definitely great to get your foot in the door. The biggest issue is experience. If you are in a smaller area, the lack of experience isn't as detrimental as in a metropolitan area.

    Agreed. I'm in a suburban area about 50 miles north of NYC. Just having an A+ plus some hands on experience (like a year) landed a helpdesk spot. Having a handful of the Comptia+ certs definitely isn't worthless but wont weigh like the Microsoft stuff, granted the place your trying to work for uses them.
  • pitviperpitviper CCNP:Collaboration, CCNP:R&S, CCNA:S, CCNA:V, CCNA, CCENT Member Posts: 1,376 ■■■■■■■□□□
    CompTIA to get your foot in the door only – after you get an IT gig if planning on growing into a net/sys admin role, drop them from your resume. Common consensus from a group of hiring managers from one of my networking groups – they chuckle when they are listed on a mid to upper level resume submission.
    CCNP:Collaboration, CCNP:R&S, CCNA:S, CCNA:V, CCNA, CCENT
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Member Posts: 832 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Microsoft holds more weight, CompTIA certs are vendor neutral and guide you to a career path you wish to take IT but these two vendors we cannot compare because they just career path, CompTIA certs are a stepping stone to get ahead into a career you want to take and that could be microsoft, your Cisco, redhat, IBM certs, etc Comptia can get you to these certs.
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Member Posts: 2,013 ■■■■■□□□□□
    But the thread isn't asking about MCP/MCTS/MCSA. The thread is asking about MTAs. I don't see how the MTAs are better than the CompTIAs.
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  • cruwlcruwl Member Posts: 341 ■■□□□□□□□□
    As some one who holds MTAs, COmptia Cert, and MCTS. MTA skill level IMHO is below that of Comptia. I walked in and passed 3 MTAs with out studying. I dont think I would pass the net+ right now with out at least brushing up on it. you can get 2-3 MTAs for the price of 1 comptia cert. Personally Comptia holds more weight to me then the MTAs do, But I was able to pad my resume pretty easily with the MTAs and for a cheap price too.
  • Sounds GoodSounds Good Member Posts: 403
    pitviper wrote: »
    CompTIA to get your foot in the door only – after you get an IT gig if planning on growing into a net/sys admin role, drop them from your resume. Common consensus from a group of hiring managers from one of my networking groups – they chuckle when they are listed on a mid to upper level resume submission.

    Yea I've thought of this before, but haven't ever really researched it.

    I have the trifecta (A/N/S), but am thinking about taking off A+ and definitely N+ (I have BCNE and CCNA). Security+ I'd keep because I think it's somewhat helpful for government jobs.

    Anyone else have insight on this?
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  • ThexzenoThexzeno Member Posts: 44 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Yea I've thought of this before, but haven't ever really researched it.

    I have the trifecta (A/N/S), but am thinking about taking off A+ and definitely N+ (I have BCNE and CCNA). Security+ I'd keep because I think it's somewhat helpful for government jobs.

    Anyone else have insight on this?

    you aware brah?
  • Sounds GoodSounds Good Member Posts: 403
    Thexzeno wrote: »
    you aware brah?

    haha. aware
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  • aspiringsoulaspiringsoul Member Posts: 314
    I've got the trifecta as well as the Server+. CompTIA exams are a mile wide in scope but just an inch in depth. You learn a little about everything but not a lot about a specific subject. For instance, when studying for the Network+, I learned about routing protocols. So I could tell you which protocols were distance vector or link state, but I would have no idea how to configure them on a Cisco router.

    The MCSA/MCSE and Cisco certifications are definitely more valuable than the CompTIA certifications, but there is definitely some value to be had from the CompTIA exams. They're vendor neutral, and they are recognized/required by the Department of Defense.

    If you want to save money, just go after CCNA and MCSA/MCSE, but I still strongly recommend studying the CompTIA material, as it will benefit you and prepare you for the vendor specific exams.

    The CompTIA exams made me a much more competent networking professional and I highly recommend them if your employer will pay for them. The Network+ has made studying for the CCNA much less of a pain.
    Education: MS-Information Security and Assurance from Western Governors University, BS-Business Information Systems from Indiana Wesleyan University, AAS-Computer Network Systems - ITT Tech,
  • joemysteriojoemysterio Member Posts: 152
    The CompTIA exams made me a much more competent networking professional and I highly recommend them if your employer will pay for them. The Network+ has made studying for the CCNA much less of a pain.
    that is what i'm hoping for haha. Next week I should hopefully be able to do the A+, then the next one should be Net+.
    Current goals: CCNA/CCNP
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    The CompTIA exams made me a much more competent networking professional and I highly recommend them if your employer will pay for them. The Network+ has made studying for the CCNA much less of a pain.

    See, I think that is where the confusion comes in. Learning the basics and creating a good foundation make you a more competent professional. I don't think anyone would advise anyone not to learn the basics. What some people do advise though is to not put money into exams that do not have much of a return for you career wise.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
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