some questions about recruiters

treehousetreehouse Member Posts: 77 ■■□□□□□□□□
I posted my resume (thanks again for the help, Essendon and others) at a few places, and immediately got emails from half a dozen recruiters. Most of the emails were obviously form letters so I ignored them, but I did respond to the two that appeared to have been crafted by a human.

Anyway, I talked to one of them on the phone today and he wants me to come in for an interview on Thursday. I have no experience with IT recruiters, so I thought I'd check with the experts again.

What can I expect at this interview? Should I dress for it as if I'm going to an interview for a job? The firm he works with does recruiting for some of the places in town that I'd really like to work for some day (Fortune 500 companies, hospitals, etc.).

Also, what should I expect from working with recruiters in general? Is it like working with a real estate agent where you have one represent you at a time, or do you work with as many recruiters as you trust until someone lands you a job?

I've heard some have a reputation for being exploitative (just putting you into the lowest wage job you'll take so they can get their commission). Is there much merit to that?

Thanks for any insight you have!
2015 GOALS

VCP [ ] VCP5-DT

Comments

  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    Recruiter interviews are a piece of cake. They tend to not be overly technical. They might have a prepared test that you take and it grades you on your proficiency in IT but the actual conversation won't be technical. They are usually very eager to get you into an interview with their client (sometimes even if you are not qualified for the position) and that's where you might trip and fail a technical interview. The hourly rate tends to be negotiable but you have to be aggressive to get the best rate.

    That being said, contracting is an excellent way for employers to "try before they buy" and most of my longer IT jobs started out this way before they transitioned me to FTE. I would definitely give it a shot
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
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  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    treehouse wrote: »
    Anyway, I talked to one of them on the phone today and he wants me to come in for an interview on Thursday. I have no experience with IT recruiters, so I thought I'd check with the experts again.
    I can't think of anything that needs to be exchanged between a recruiter and job-seeker that couldn't be done more efficiently via e-mail or over-the-phone. I've only personally met one once, and it was a waste of time.
    Also, what should I expect from working with recruiters in general?
    You post your resume. Recruiter ping you and 100 others with the right stuff in your resume (e.g., "CCNA" or "CCNP") with a vague job description. You discuss the job and your qualifications further (filtering both ways). If it's a likely fit, they submit your resume to that place. Occasionally, the recruiters are asked to do a mini phone screen, and pass on those results. They also may be your point-of-contact when handling the logistics of interviews and offers for that position.
    I've heard some have a reputation for being exploitative (just putting you into the lowest wage job you'll take so they can get their commission). Is there much merit to that?
    Edit: It's always up to you what job you accept. If a recruiter offers you a job that pays too little, say no.
  • 2URGSE2URGSE Member Posts: 220 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Recruiter interviews are a piece of cake. They tend to not be overly technical. They might have a prepared test that you take and it grades you on your proficiency in IT but the actual conversation won't be technical. They are usually very eager to get you into an interview with their client (sometimes even if you are not qualified for the position) and that's where you might trip and fail a technical interview. The hourly rate tends to be negotiable but you have to be aggressive to get the best rate.

    That being said, contracting is an excellent way for employers to "try before they buy" and most of my longer IT jobs started out this way before they transitioned me to FTE. I would definitely give it a shot

    ++++++1. Agree with every world here.

    The initial interview is easy, and most recruiters are dumber than a sack of rocks when it comes to technical terms.

    It's the 2nd interview with the client's team that makes or breaks the deal.

    As far as the rate, you won't get $80/hr right away, but you need to start somewhere and gain some experience, when the contract ends, you can choose to move to another one or get hired by the client. Make sure you ask about medical/dental/vision benefits from your recruiter. In most cases, you'd be paying partially for those yourself, as a pre-tax deduction.
    A+
    Network+
    CCENT (formally CCNA certified)
    ICE (Imprivata Certified Engineer)
  • treehousetreehouse Member Posts: 77 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you for the responses!
    That being said, contracting is an excellent way for employers to "try before they buy" and most of my longer IT jobs started out this way before they transitioned me to FTE. I would definitely give it a shot

    This is my hope. I asked him nicely not to waste my time with anything that didn't have benefits or full-time employment at the end (I'm the sole provider for a family of four, so I'm not really interested in a string of contracts without healthcare and PTO). The two jobs he rattled off last time I talked to him were with large, reputable companies that have headquarters either here or at the state capital. We'll see! They're NOC jobs, too, so if either one is palatable I'll be able to start putting in time on my CCNP.
    2015 GOALS

    VCP [ ] VCP5-DT
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