CCNP Crossroads

blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
I don't know about anyone else, but after CCNP I feel as if I am without a definite cert goal for this year.

Right now I want to do by end of year, either CCIE Written, CCDA+CCDP, or perhaps something different like RHEL.

I don't know which will give me the most ROI, but I my goals are ultimately to work from home so I have more time with the family.

Anyone else been at this particular spot before?

Comments

  • MeatCatalogueMeatCatalogue Member Posts: 145
    based on my experience, ccna voice would give you the best ROI
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    based on my experience, ccna voice would give you the best ROI

    You just read my mind, right after I hit the reply button.

    I did buy the Cisco Press 640-461 guide, but my mind just started to wander after chapter 3.
  • iamme4evaiamme4eva Member Posts: 272
    I finished my CCNP and didn't know really where to go. But then I got a job interview and landed the job. The job is quite heavily security related, so I've decided to do my CCNA: Security followed by my CCNP Security. I also figured that it would make the CCIE (my longer term ambition) easier if I'd covered some of the firewall topics before I went into it.
    Current objective: CCNA Security
    My blog: mybraindump.co.uk
  • MeatCatalogueMeatCatalogue Member Posts: 145
    You just read my mind, right after I hit the reply button.

    I did buy the Cisco Press 640-461 guide, but my mind just started to wander after chapter 3.

    All I can tell you really is that the voice guys are in huge demand and get paid well. I guess it depends on whether you like your current position and whether you like voice.
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    All I can tell you really is that the voice guys are in huge demand and get paid well. I guess it depends on whether you like your current position and whether you like voice.



    Tell you the truth, I enjoy R/S more, but thats just me. I imagine knowing both is a good thing, so maybe voice can be my "backup," although the whole VOIP thing seems like its in a bubble.
    iamme4eva wrote: »
    I finished my CCNP and didn't know really where to go. But then I got a job interview and landed the job. The job is quite heavily security related, so I've decided to do my CCNA: Security followed by my CCNP Security. I also figured that it would make the CCIE (my longer term ambition) easier if I'd covered some of the firewall topics before I went into it.

    There are no firewall concepts on CCIE R/S.
  • filkenjitsufilkenjitsu CCNA R&S, CCNA SP Member Posts: 561 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I think it is best to get certified in the technologies you work with unless you are looking for a career change or job change.

    For instance, I work with Cisco and Alcatel-Lucent routers, specifically layer 3 technologies such as BFD, OSPF, BGP, and MPLS. So for me, the CCNP is best (due to industry recognition) then CCNP service provider, then Alcate-Lucent certifications, then CCDA/CCDP to advance myself towards being an architect. I hardly work with any switch concepts, so it will be a struggle to get past switch, there is just an abundance of more study materials available for CCNP compared with CCNP Service Provider.
    CISSP, CCNA SP
    Bachelors of Science in Telecommunications - Mt. Sierra College
    Masters of Networking and Communications Management, Focus in Wireless - Keller
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    I think it is best to get certified in the technologies you work with unless you are looking for a career change or job change.

    For instance, I work with Cisco and Alcatel-Lucent routers, specifically layer 3 technologies such as BFD, OSPF, BGP, and MPLS. So for me, the CCNP is best (due to industry recognition) then CCNP service provider, then Alcate-Lucent certifications, then CCDA/CCDP to advance myself towards being an architect. I hardly work with any switch concepts, so it will be a struggle to get past switch, there is just an abundance of more study materials available for CCNP compared with CCNP Service Provider.

    Makes perfect sense, I just don't want to have ALL my eggs in one basket should the winds change.

    Having a backup skill is what I want, something that compliments R/S.

    I enjoy R/S more than Voice, but like I said, I just may want something to fall back on if need be.
  • FloOzFloOz Member Posts: 1,614 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Have you looked into potentially going the Data Center route?
  • iamme4evaiamme4eva Member Posts: 272
    There are no firewall concepts on CCIE R/S.

    CCIE R/S Written Syllabus:


    6.00
    Implement Network Security



    6.01
    Implement access lists



    6.02
    Implement Zone Based Firewall



    6.03
    Implement Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF)



    6.04
    Implement IP Source Guard



    6.05
    Implement authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) (configuring the AAA server is not required, only the client-side (IOS) is configured)



    6.06
    Implement Control Plane Policing (CoPP)



    6.07
    Implement Cisco IOS Firewall



    6.08
    Implement Cisco IOS Intrusion Prevention System (IPS)



    6.09
    Implement Secure Shell (SSH)



    6.10
    Implement 802.1x



    6.11
    Implement NAT



    6.12
    Implement routing protocol authentication



    6.13
    Implement device access control



    6.14
    Implement security features



    That's what I saw.

    Like I say, security will be good for my job too.
    Current objective: CCNA Security
    My blog: mybraindump.co.uk
  • filkenjitsufilkenjitsu CCNA R&S, CCNA SP Member Posts: 561 ■■■■□□□□□□
    With Software Defined Networking with APIs coming, learning Java would give you a leg up!
    CISSP, CCNA SP
    Bachelors of Science in Telecommunications - Mt. Sierra College
    Masters of Networking and Communications Management, Focus in Wireless - Keller
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    With Software Defined Networking with APIs coming, learning Java would give you a leg up!

    I'd rather be a professional dog walker.
    FloOz wrote: »
    Have you looked into potentially going the Data Center route?
    No, but I also haven't seen any job offers in this route in my area. Its most R/S then voice and security.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    There are no firewall concepts on CCIE R/S.
    The IOS Firewall Feature set is indeed covered by the CCIE R&S.

    Get into a review process, so you don't forget your CCNP material! Your CCNP may qualify you for more jobs, but if you forget much of the material, you will not compare well vs. other CCNPs. This is the curse of higher certifications. They pay more, but they also expect you to retain more. Regular review will also help when you're ready for CCIE.

    I'd also aim for more CCNA- or CCNP-level certifications to strengthen your "intermediate" base. Also consider whether there are other vendors you use regularly where a little extra knowledge may help. :)
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    So I guess my job until my next full time job will be trying not to forget what I learned. Thats depressing.
  • NetworkVeteranNetworkVeteran Member Posts: 2,338 ■■■■■■■■□□
    So I guess my job until my next full time job will be trying not to forget what I learned. Thats depressing.
    The good news is, the time required to keep a body of knowledge fresh decreases each day you study. E.g., if I'm not adding new knowledge, I will see a steady drop in necessary review time from 15min/day to 10min/day to 5min/day. I use spaced repetition with flash cards, but note-taking, mind maps, and integrated lab scenarios are all viable. :)
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    That is a good point. I do tend to think of networking as a kind of mental judo, and repetition is one of the keys to mastery.
  • iamme4evaiamme4eva Member Posts: 272
    One of my main uses for this forum (when I'm not asking dumb questions about what I'm studying) is to read people's questions and answers and google things I don't understand or can't remember. I find it helps keep my brain ticking over and remembering stuff.
    Current objective: CCNA Security
    My blog: mybraindump.co.uk
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    MMmmmmmmmmm Voice.

    Would love to do that, but need to get CCIE R&S first. Then I can branch out. Considering CCIE #2 and #3 already... (SP/Security) - depends on demands or what happens after I get the first one.

    Any of the other CCNA specialisations shouldn't take too long to attain and would quickly branch out ones CV. Though, a CCIE also enables one to skip all other CCNA's if one wants to do an NP level. I.e. CCIE in anything would be a pre-req for CCNP Voice, for example....
  • iamme4evaiamme4eva Member Posts: 272
    I think I'd still do the NA first for a specific topic though, just to give the foundations. At the very least I'd study it - might not waste all the money on the exam...
    Current objective: CCNA Security
    My blog: mybraindump.co.uk
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    Bah, in for a penny, in for a pound, get the full on textbooks and study the topics outside of the confines of the blueprints :D
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    gorebrush wrote: »
    Bah, in for a penny, in for a pound, get the full on textbooks and study the topics outside of the confines of the blueprints :D
    I don't really understand the cockney slang but I think I interpret what you are sayin, brah.
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    No cockney slang there..

    Explanation "Originally with reference to the fact that if one owed a penny, one might as well owe a pound (pound sterling, UK currency) as the penalties for non-payment were virtually identical in severity."

    :D
  • blueberriesblueberries Banned Posts: 138
    gorebrush wrote: »
    No cockney slang there..

    Explanation "Originally with reference to the fact that if one owed a penny, one might as well owe a pound (pound sterling, UK currency) as the penalties for non-payment were virtually identical in severity."

    :D

    Shimmin, Pushin and poppin, brah.

    What parts of the UK are you in?

    British pounds sound mighty nice right now.
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    I am in South Wales. Our accents are epic.
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