Studying for Linux+ advice

southsouth Member Posts: 43 ■■□□□□□□□□
I have been using the Roderick Smith Sybex book, stacks of notes, CBT Nuggets, and google. I have been studying for the past few months and haven't felt like I have gotten that far. I suppose I am having trouble making up labs to get more accustomed to the commands, but I feel like something is missing. I have also felt maybe I have been going to deep into certain topics (init daemons, grub2) and maybe I don't need to. I keep hearing a lot of what is on the exam is not covered in the book. If you have passed the exam recently how did you go about preparing for it? Do you feel like the book and videos are enough?

Comments

  • The_ExpertThe_Expert Member Posts: 136
    I posted this advice on another thread.... Get this book:

    I would highly recommend you get the following book as your main reference:

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification
    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification (Networking (Course Technology)): Jason W. Eckert: 9781418837211: Amazon.com: Books


    This is a college text book which is probably one of the best books I have seen on this subject. The book contains exercises in each chapter which covers what you will see on the Linux+ exam.

    By reading the book and practicing your skills with the hands-on exercises, you'll be well prepared to pass the Linux+ exams.

    Note that this book uses an older flavor of Linux (Fedora 12) - however, the concepts you will learn will carry over to newer versions.

    You'll be ready to pass the LX0-101 exam once you complete the 1st seven (7) chapters. The second half will cover LX0-102. There are about 14 chapters in this book.
    Masters, Public Administration (MPA), Bachelor of Science, 20+ years of technical experience.

    Studying on again, off again...
  • CoolAsAFanCoolAsAFan Member Posts: 239
    I just passed this beast last week (after failing LX0-102 once), but I had access to material supplied through my school called LabSim. Some good advice for no matter what resources you use- just print out the Linux+ exam objectives and make sure you can cover the basics of everything on it. If the material your using covers topics not mentioned in the exam objectives, don't spend as much time on them as you do on topics that are listed in the objectives which will for sure be on the exam. And you don't need to memorize every single option of every single to pass this exam if your starting to feel overwhelmed, but it certainly helps. Make sure your murdering those practice exams too!

    Hope this helps, good luck!
    IvyTech - AS CINS (Completed: May, 2013)
    WGU Indiana - BS IT Security
    (Started: August 1st, 2013)
    Transferred: AGC1 CDP1 BVC1 CLC1 CVV1 DHV1 DJV1 GAC1 CIC1 CDC1 UBT1 IWC1 IWT1 TCP1 TJP1 TJC1 EBV1 WFV1 EUP1 EUC1 CJC1 UBC1 TBP1
    Completed: CUV1 BOV1 DRV1 DSV1 CTV1 CJV1 COV1 CQV1 CNV1 TPV1 MGC1 TXC1 TXP1 BNC1 TYP1 TYC1
    Required: SBT1 RGT1 RIT1
  • SneakySSneakyS Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    The_Expert wrote: »
    I posted this advice on another thread.... Get this book:

    I would highly recommend you get the following book as your main reference:

    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification
    Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification (Networking (Course Technology)): Jason W. Eckert: 9781418837211: Amazon.com: Books


    This is a college text book which is probably one of the best books I have seen on this subject. The book contains exercises in each chapter which covers what you will see on the Linux+ exam.

    Can anyone confirm this? I'm about to start studying for Linux+. So far I've signed up for the CBT Nuggets videos and ordered the Linux Bilbe 8th Edition.
    How is the mentioned college book compared to
    [h=1]LPIC-1/CompTIA Linux+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide by Rob Tracey[/h]Which one would you get if you had to choose between those two and why?

    Thank you,
  • The_ExpertThe_Expert Member Posts: 136
    Well, the Linux Bible is a great book... but I still recommend the Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, since it follows the Linux+ exam so closely.

    There are a lot of hands-on exercises in this book which will help you remember the commands and concepts.

    Otherwise, get the Sybex Study Guide as it also outlines the Linux+ concepts. There are no practice exercises in this book, though. It mainly just covers the topics and what commands to use in a condensed version.
    Masters, Public Administration (MPA), Bachelor of Science, 20+ years of technical experience.

    Studying on again, off again...
  • SneakySSneakyS Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    The_Expert wrote: »
    Well, the Linux Bible is a great book... but I still recommend the Linux+ Guide to Linux Certification, since it follows the Linux+ exam so closely.

    There are a lot of hands-on exercises in this book which will help you remember the commands and concepts.

    Otherwise, get the Sybex Study Guide as it also outlines the Linux+ concepts. There are no practice exercises in this book, though. It mainly just covers the topics and what commands to use in a condensed version.

    The only reason I didn't order it yet is because I've read that there are no answers to the questions? I don't see it be any good to me if I don't have the answers...
  • pamccabepamccabe Member Posts: 315 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Expert, great resource, thank you for sharing. This is on my list to buy next.

    As far as the answers, that might be a good point, but I'm sure you can google or ask around for correct answers. I don't see it as that big of a problem.
  • The_ExpertThe_Expert Member Posts: 136
    This is true... there are no answers per se in the book. However, just by reading the chapter (which explains the upcoming commands used in the exercises) and then doing the exercises, you will pickup on what response you are supposed to get.

    Like pamccabe stated - additional info can always be googled.

    I do know that this method worked very well for me... and I highly recommend it to anyone.
    Masters, Public Administration (MPA), Bachelor of Science, 20+ years of technical experience.

    Studying on again, off again...
  • lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Since I was new to Linux I printed out the Exam Objectives and wrote on them like a good old fashion study guide. This helped me go through EVERYTHING that could possibly be on the exam.

    I also read Welsh's Running Linux while working in an Ubuntu VM to run through what was discussed in the book.

    I was also working as a linux admin so I was able to learn on the job.
  • Shadow RealmShadow Realm Member Posts: 15 ■□□□□□□□□□
    What do they use in the Linux+ exam? Fedora, BSD, Suse or just plain old Debian. Good luck with the course and let us know how it goes. I'm considering having a crack at it later
    Currently Working On: CompTIA A+ and MCITP: Windows 7
    Want To Complete: Network+, Security+, Linux+, CCENT, CCNA, CCNA Security, RHCE, CISSP (Associate)
  • BryzeyBryzey Member Posts: 260
    What do they use in the Linux+ exam?

    Its vendor neutral. Just need to learn both rpm and deb package manager. Debian and CentOS I'm using for my studies.
Sign In or Register to comment.