What salary with the fallowing certifications and experience.

co.adorco.ador Member Posts: 11 ■□□□□□□□□□
By the summer I am striving to achieve.

A+
NET+
CCNA
SEcurity+
Server+
MSCE

I have two years of full experience by then.

My experience consist on

1-POS
2-Refresments
3-Printer Installation and set up
4-Some Printer Repairs
5-Imaging
6-Break and Fix of Laptop and Desktop as a full time.


What would be the expected salary with those Qualifications?
What type of job I could land on?

Comments

  • netsysllcnetsysllc Member Posts: 479 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Certifications compliment experience. They might get you past HR but will not likely get you a high paying job. You will have to work in the trenches for a few more years and prove you know those technologies. In Arizona I would say $30-35K is a reasonable salary.
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Member Posts: 2,015 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Salary will probably be determined more by your experience and what you want to move forward doing by then.
    Goals for 2018:
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  • rowelldrowelld Member Posts: 176
    You cannot accurately come up with salary expectations based on what you've provided. A lot of it will also largely depend on the organization and your location.

    The best way to gauge salary with your experience is to go on job search sites and look at similar titles that post expected salary ranges. You can also take a look at salary surveys such as this one: Robert Half Technology

    But take those surveys with a grain of salt. The responses are based on individuals who have participated in the survey.
    Visit my blog: http://www.packet6.com - I'm on the CWNE journey!
  • kohr-ahkohr-ah Member Posts: 1,277
    @co.ador

    I'd say first go for a NOC job if going for Cisco or Jr systems admin if doing msce.

    I'd shoot for the mcsa more the mcse and skip server+. I not sure but I'd even say skip Net+ if you are getting your ccna.

    But here in Illinois I'd say you are looking at 40k beginning. Get some experience under your belt in Cisco or MS server and should be able to hit 55k-60k.
  • instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    Certs drive you past HR.
    Experience drives your salary.

    You'll be able to get past HR, and you can probably get a junior admin job with those certs. If you press and push it up some, you can look at getting into higher level jobs.

    Your movement upward depends on how hard you want to work at it.

    I'd recommend exploring the type of work you want to be doing, so you can get the right focus. If you're salary-focused, specialization can help you increase your salary, to a certain extent.

    Hope this helps.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
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  • LarryDaManLarryDaMan Member Posts: 797
    At least minimum wage I'd say.
  • matt333matt333 Senior packet farmer Bay AreaMember Posts: 265 ■■■■□□□□□□
    instant000 wrote: »
    Certs drive you past HR.
    Experience drives your salary.
    Pretty much sums up your question. Having both will make you the most marketable aka everyone will want to talk to you but without the experience its just a piece of paper to any good IT hiring manager.

    Experience > Certs

    Put the time in and your salary will only go up.
    Studying: Automating Everything, network API's, Python etc.. 
    Certifications: CCNP, CCDP, JNCIP-DC, JNCIS-DevOps, JNCIS-ENT
  • PolynomialPolynomial Member Posts: 365
    instant000 wrote: »
    Certs drive you past HR.
    Experience drives your salary.

    While I like this quote a lot remember it depends on the place you're applying to. Some places (smaller to mid size businesses) just don't give a damn about certifications and education. It kind of depends on the company culture and the IT department you'd be working with.
  • nestechnestech Member Posts: 74 ■■■□□□□□□□
    @co.ador


    I would say start looking for Desktop Support position... Not sure about the salary that may depend on the company and what they are willing to pay...
  • co.adorco.ador Member Posts: 11 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I w ould like to hit the 60k and 70k. I love Networking hardware and Server management. I found those topic very interested. I would enjoy telephony where you could have access to telephone communication. I also wonder if there is a way to combine CCNA and MSCE or MSCA and get a salary deal in between both. Or I will have to drive on either or?
  • IvanjamIvanjam Member Posts: 978 ■■■■□□□□□□
    @co.ador - as the previous posters tried to tell you, certs don't determine your salary level - at best, they will only get you an interview. What will get you 60 or 70k is the actual knowledge and experience that you possess and, of course, the willingness of the employer to pay that amount for your particular skill-set in your geographic area.
    Fall 2014: Start MA in Mathematics [X]
    Fall 2016: Start PhD in Mathematics [X]
  • kohr-ahkohr-ah Member Posts: 1,277
    co.ador wrote: »
    I w ould like to hit the 60k and 70k. I love Networking hardware and Server management. I found those topic very interested. I would enjoy telephony where you could have access to telephone communication. I also wonder if there is a way to combine CCNA and MSCE or MSCA and get a salary deal in between both. Or I will have to drive on either or?

    You are looking at it all wrong. Get certified for the job you want and getting experience will get you the pay you want in time. I know people that make well above what you are asking and aren't even certified but have a lot of experience.

    The MCSA and CCNA will allow you to do both systems admin and networking but most jobs you will do more of one than the other.
  • ratbuddyratbuddy Member Posts: 665
    co.ador wrote: »
    I would enjoy telephony where you could have access to telephone communication.

    Might be a language issue, but that sounds pretty evil, and I wouldn't mention it during an interview.
  • VAHokie56VAHokie56 Member Posts: 783
    LarryDaMan wrote: »
    At least minimum wage I'd say.

    I laughed out loud
    .ιlι..ιlι.
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  • co.adorco.ador Member Posts: 11 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank you for the advise. But I have you have the chance of hearing scanner is fun. Not that I want mess around with that which is private. It sound like there is not hope from many comments here. I have understood that the only way is by building experience but at the same time without a license there is not way to build experience though.
  • rowelldrowelld Member Posts: 176
    There's a way to build experience without a certification. That's where your resume and interview skills come in. Win them over. Don't rely on certifications alone. Follow up with them after submitting your resume. Let your name be known. Show you're determined.
    Visit my blog: http://www.packet6.com - I'm on the CWNE journey!
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Member Posts: 1,104
    co.ador wrote: »
    It sound like there is not hope from many comments here.

    If that is what you have taken from the responses then that is reflection of your mindset. YOU are your only obstacle to achieving what you want out of your career.

    The problem is your approach is a "cart before the horse" mentality. You have obviously been led to believe that an IT certification equals high salary. Welcome to reality because that is NOT true. Certification is a "supplement" to your experience.

    What good is a CCNA who has never touched a production network? What good is an MCSE who has never implemented an Active Directory environment? See where I am going?

    Look for something in Help Desk or Desktop support. You have to learn to crawl before you can walk. Building a strong skillset takes time, experience is accumulated over a long period of time. An employer is paying you for what you can do for them, not your test taking skills.

    So what do you want to do? You want to work on everything? Only systems? Only Networks? You have to lay out what you want then start taking steps to get there. Certification is only a piece of the puzzle
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • lawrence_of_arabialawrence_of_arabia Member Posts: 58 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Worry less about salary and more about learning for now.
  • unfbilly11unfbilly11 Member Posts: 100 ■■□□□□□□□□
    If your profile is accurate and you only have the A+ right now, I am hesitant to think that you will get NET+, CCNA, Security+, Server+, and a MCSE all by June or so. I guess it's not impossible but that's a lot of work and you almost certainly couldn't soak up the information required to land a higher paying job in an interview.


    Like others have said, I would try to gain more experience in the real world and go through the certifications at a pace that allows you to commit all the knowledge to long term memory.
  • mistabrumley89mistabrumley89 Member Posts: 356 ■■■□□□□□□□
    YOU are your only obstacle to achieving what you want out of your career.
    Welcome to reality because that is NOT true. Certification is a "supplement" to your experience.

    What good is a CCNA who has never touched a production network? What good is an MCSE who has never implemented an Active Directory environment? See where I am going?
    Very well put.

    I agree with what everyone else is saying though. I have a handful of entry level certifications, and I know I can back it up. But when I move up to higher level certifications, then I will be lacking in the experience department. Just ask yourself, if you were looking at someone just by their job title, then how much would you expect them to know? I believe there is an expected minimum amount of experience based on job title/pay grade... regardless of what certifications you have. Just working as a network admin in the army and getting new soldiers in that were certified, but had no experience... you could CLEARLY see how much more profitable it would be to a company to hire someone with experience over certifications. Just my 2 cents. I learned 95% of what I know from my job, not from studying. I use studying for certifications to brush up on the technology's I may have difficulties with, or that I might not know enough details about.

    Don't let what everyone is saying get you down. Just drive on and put 100% into your studies/job
    Goals: WGU BS: IT-Sec (DONE) | CCIE Written: In Progress
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  • dou2bledou2ble Member Posts: 160
    Makes me suspiciuos that you're trying to brain ****. I apologize if I'm making assumptions here. But just in case for those thinking about it...N+, S+ are easy tests and I'm assuming Server + is too. But MCSE and CCNA should be taken once some experience has been earned. I've seen people brain **** and pass them but it really shows (extremely obvious) on the job. A true CCNA would have commands memorized, probably uses en instead of enable, and does not have to google the difference between > and #. I echo what others have said about gaining experience and then taking the cert to back it up.
    unfbilly11 wrote: »
    If your profile is accurate and you only have the A+ right now, I am hesitant to think that you will get NET+, CCNA, Security+, Server+, and a MCSE all by June or so. I guess it's not impossible but that's a lot of work and you almost certainly couldn't soak up the information required to land a higher paying job in an interview.


    Like others have said, I would try to gain more experience in the real world and go through the certifications at a pace that allows you to commit all the knowledge to long term memory.
    2015 Goals: Masters in Cyber Security
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