Too many computers tripping the 15A breaker

9bits9bits Member Posts: 138 ■■□□□□□□□□
So the owner, whom I rent from, won't let me change the 15A to a 20A breaker myself. I'm trying to guestimate what an electrician would charge.

Most of the breakers in the box are 20A, with only the bedrooms and a couple others being 15A. That said, I'm not 100% sure if 12guage line was run in the entirety of the house, which is generally what's required for a 20A. If it was, then the breaker swap should be simple. If not, the electrician will probably insist on running a new line.

Anyone ever have to deal with paying an electrician? What kind of money do they charge for something like this? I'm guessing a lot.

Comments

  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,028 ■■■■■■■■□□
    12 gauge wiring typically isn't used for residential buildings, By code the kitchen and washer are 12 gauge, but 14 gauge is the standard for lighting/outlet circuits. Depends if it's 12 gauge or not, an electrician will not violate the electrical codes. Your looking at around $100 service call and the cost of the breaker if he can do it. If he needs to run another separate circuit your looking at around $300. I used to be an electrician helper for a couple of years, so if you have questions and want to burn you house down, ask away.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • 9bits9bits Member Posts: 138 ■■□□□□□□□□
    TechGromit wrote: »
    12 gauge wiring typically isn't used for residential buildings, By code the kitchen and washer are 12 gauge, but 14 gauge is the standard for lighting/outlet circuits. Depends if it's 12 gauge or not, an electrician will not violate the electrical codes. Your looking at around $100 service call and the cost of the breaker if he can do it. If he needs to run another separate circuit your looking at around $300. I used to be an electrician helper for a couple of years, so if you have questions and want to burn you house down, ask away.

    Thanks for the response. Looks like I could anticipate about $500 for the job on the high end.
  • CardboardCardboard Member Posts: 43 ■■□□□□□□□□
    You need to map out the breakers in your box and split your load among more than one breaker. You'd be surprised which breakers can power which outlets, it can be really screwed up with no clear pattern.

    Watch this video. Skip to the 2:20 mark to begin, you will learn everything you need to do in under 5 minutes. This is an excellent explanation.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgHGxY6YNxY
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