Network + or MCSE

MeiraleahMeiraleah Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi there. I'm starting from nothing and want to combine some solid IT knowledge with my now useless law degree. I'm not clear on the difference between Network + and MCSE? Which is more marketable? Do they lead to the same areas for practice? I am more interested in the analytical side of IT and would like to do additional studies down the road in Network Security and Cyberspace Forensics. I was told to think about SCNP. Can one start the MCSE with no background at all? Are courses recommended? Or can one do this with self-study? Thanks.

Comments

  • mynameisboringmynameisboring Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    oh boy it sounds like you have a long way to go.

    MCSE is definitly better to have because its harder, but what the route that most people take here is A+ -> Network+ -> Server+ or MCSE -> Cisco certificates or more MS certificates.

    My suggestion is you go to a book store pick up a book for MCSE read the chapter topics if nothing makes sense to you, then do the same with Network+ and if things still don't make sense start studying for A+.
  • MeiraleahMeiraleah Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks. Are you going for your Network + next? I was told that there wasn't much one could do jobwise with just A+. Network doesn't seem difficult after A+.
  • tincotinco Posts: 1Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I know how do you feel, however, your field of knowledge is not computing therefore, think very well which course should you be doing.
    I suggest the best certification for you is Oracle certification. It is one of the hottest certifications.
    According to your background, I think it is more suitable for you as it is involve analytical type of work and most demanding.
    But do not take my word, do some research about it.

    go to www.oracle.com and go to Oracle University
    icon_wink.gif

    ray
  • KingKKingK Posts: 35Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Network plus is ONE test, mainly dealing with non-vendor specific specifications for networking, it mainly deals with the physical aspects and protocols used for setting up small to large scale networks.

    MSCE is SEVEN tests and is specific to the Windows Operating System in which you choose to go for. You can get certified in WIndows 2000 and now 2003.

    If you want to be an admin and deal with RUNNING, maintaining, baselining and supporting a network based on the windows platform, then MCSE might be up your alley.

    Network plus, deals more with setting up the network, as oppossed to operating it.

    Me personally, I am skipping out on the MCSE.

    My path is something like this: Net+>CCNA>Server+>RHCE>CCNP>CCIE?
  • pjrousepjrouse Posts: 40Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    KingK wrote:
    Network plus is ONE test, mainly dealing with non-vendor specific specifications for networking, it mainly deals with the physical aspects and protocols used for setting up small to large scale networks.

    MSCE is SEVEN tests and is specific to the Windows Operating System in which you choose to go for. You can get certified in WIndows 2000 and now 2003.

    If you want to be an admin and deal with RUNNING, maintaining, baselining and supporting a network based on the windows platform, then MCSE might be up your alley.

    Network plus, deals more with setting up the network, as oppossed to operating it.

    Me personally, I am skipping out on the MCSE.

    My path is something like this: Net+>CCNA>Server+>RHCE>CCNP>CCIE?

    You can now use A+ and N+ towards your MCSE/MCSA instead of one of the elective Exams so there is no harm in doing them and moving on to an MS certification programme as they will count.

    I've passed my first MCP (Win 2K - 70-210) and wanna get through A+ and N+ before tackling the heavy server stuff for my MCSA.

    Paul
    VCP5-DCV
    MCSE Server 2012
    MCITP: Enterprise Administrator - Server 2008
    Network+
  • KDEKDE Posts: 20Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I would recommend getting a solid understanding of how computers operate at the OS and hardware levels. then it will make everything else easier to understand. I started out with College courses which I graduated with a degree in Computer Information Systems, then I got A+, now I'm working on Net+, I plan on taking my Net+ exam around the end of November. I have also been studying for Linux+, which I stopped for fear of overloading myself with information.

    My plan is degree>A+>Net+>Linux+>Server+>Security+>MCSE
    knowledge is power!
  • LexxdymondzLexxdymondz Posts: 356Member
    In my personal opinion the A+ and Net+ should be the fundamentals for everyone. They give you the basic knowledge that every other cert builds off of. If you don't have that basic knowledge most of the information won't make too much since. My path started out like this (besides the non computer related certs).

    A+>Net+>MCSA>I-net+>Security+(studying now)>?????

    It all depends on where you would like to go and what you enjoy working with, but I personally think that everyone should start out with AT LEAST the A+ and Network+.

    My 2 cents......
  • BigdumpBigdump Posts: 1Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Just a quick point to clear up. You can use A+ and Network+ to replace your elective in MCSA but if you wanna go on to study for MCSE you will need to pass all 7 MCP exams not 6 MCP's and A+ and N+.
    I just passed my Network+ and it was fairly easy, I got 780, but I couldnt have done it without doing the A+ first. I'm studying for my 70-210 exam now and for a guy from a non IT background I'm finding it a lot easier after having passed the CompTia exams.
  • carbunklecarbunkle Posts: 97Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I am getting ready to take my network+ next week and its really fundamental stuff I dont see anyone setting up a network without. If you do go A+>MCSE then atleast go back and pick up the network+ later. My plan is A+>Network+>CCNA(I have done a lot with cisco already)>MCSE
  • RussSRussS Posts: 2,068Member
    Oh Kayyyy

    A+ & Net+ are counted towards MCSA and not MCSE. I think a good track would be A+ - Net+ - MCSE - Security+ and the other elective for the MCSE +Security certification.

    The value of these certs? - depends on your employer. Where I am there are 8 technicians working on a wide range of systems and equipment, however I am the only one with any 'industry standard' certs except for the printer guy who is MCSE. The printer guy has training course certs from the various manufacturers and the laptop guy has similar. None of the others guys who specialise in Linux, Netware or MS platforms have any certs and the boss really doesn't care about them as he prefers someone who can do the job vs someone with lots of bits of paper that say the person can pass a test.

    Do I agree with his opinion? - most certainly as I have employed many 'certified' staff in other industries and have found that all too many are good at studying for tests, but have no common sense and no ability to rationalise and diagnose. Unfortunately this trait has got to the stage that in many industries such as the motor-trade where a mechanic these days is merely a 'parts fitter' and unable to actually diagnose and repair a fault that we have lost those truly skilled personel.

    Why do I bother with certs? - For my own satisfaction and to help build my knowledge base. I have studied many different areas where I will never take the official exam, but am content with gaining the knowledge and knowing that if I run across that particular area I will have some basic idea of how it works. I have one more MCP for MCSA and will study for CISSP in the future, but whether I sit the CISSP depends on if I decide to remain a general systems engineer or if I decide to set myself up as a security analyst.

    Oh, by the way - there are also employers out there who will not hire anyone without A+, Net+ and MCSE .... and a lot of those are for 'entry level' positions where they are paying little more than minimum wages ...... go figure icon_rolleyes.gif
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  • bellboybellboy Posts: 1,017Member
    the network+ was the most rewarding exam to study for an do, and i believe that the knowledge i gained in it will prepare me for any cert exam i intent to take in the future.

    the a+ in retrospect was very easy. possibly because i had spent so long on it, but i had also come across too many sites containing actual exam questions in their practice tests.

    in my region, most top-line it jobs require microsoft or cisco certification, so if that's what you are aiming for, it's what you should try to accomplish.

    microsoft will be discontinuing their windows 2000 track exams within three years or so, so if you think it will take longer than that to obtain the seven exams necessary for mcse, then i would suggest you look at their latest track.

    cisco require their candidates to re-test every number of years, though if you continue with their exam track, passing a higher-level exam will still validate the lower-level exams.
    A+ Moderator
  • fugi1fugi1 Posts: 58Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I've searched many top networking jobs and they don't even ask about certs, all they want to know is if you can do this or do that. It's like they're not bothered about whether you have an MCSE or Cisco certs, i couldn't find one that would ask for these!
  • LexxdymondzLexxdymondz Posts: 356Member
    I'm my area i've seen "help desk" positions that require a degree and an MCSE. Go figure???

    I could have figured a trained monkey could say "What happens to be the problem?", "What share can you not access?", "Is the computer plugged in?", "Sure I can reset your FORGOTTEN password."

    icon_rolleyes.gif icon_rolleyes.gif icon_rolleyes.gif
  • tahjzhuantahjzhuan Posts: 277Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    good stuff! I should have taken A+ or Network+ years back when it was still fresh in my mind. I'm half way toward my short term goal of MCSA: messaging...

    I'm going to press forward and then come back to tackle A+ and network +
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