2 years of studying/ educations and cert grinding cannot find any jobs

boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
edited March 2019 in IT Jobs / Degrees
I cannot find a job within a 3 state radius. I am about to have enough credits at WGU for the 3rd year of a degree.

I have A+, Net+ and CCNA R&S currently.

I cannot even find an entry level help desk job. I am looking in PA, NJ and NY. Can anyone offer some advice?

My resume is attached feel free to read it.
Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.

Comments

  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,779 Mod
    Are you getting interviews at least? I would move all the information on the left hand side to the bottom of your resume. I would remove the home lab information and technical skills. Get rid of education, you have not finished that yet. For your own business, do you do any IT in that? If so, include that.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • EANxEANx Member Posts: 1,078 ■■■■■■■■□□
    In the future, be sure to anonymize yourself; no email or phone number listed here.
    I agree with the above, move the at the side, to the bottom. and get rid of the "home lab" data. Since you haven't finished your degree yet but are actively working on it, I think it's good to list that (BS in Underwater Basket Weaving, 2020). It might get you past the degree filters.
    I'm of two minds about including the boxing training but lean against it. "Good interview." "Yeah, but if they guy goes postal, who's going to stop him?" My rule of thumb is never include anything in a resume that can be used against you and while the name might be attractive from the boxing perspective, it's less than for the corporate world.
    Your summary uses some higher-dollar words to describe that you'd like to get into IT, I'd rewrite the intro paragraph to be very blunt about being a career changer. Along the lines of "Solutions-focused and customer-service oriented career changer seeking to use skills in the IT industry."
    Your top job should include as many IT-related attributes as possible including attention to detail and customer service. I'm also one of those people that feels that all of your jobs should have a paragraph followed by bullets. A sentence or two about the job and then bullets indicating the skills that cross industries.
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,306 ■■■■■■■■□□
    EANx said:
    I'm of two minds about including the boxing training but lean against it. "Good interview." "Yeah, but if they guy goes postal, who's going to stop him?" My rule of thumb is never include anything in a resume that can be used against you and while the name might be attractive from the boxing perspective, it's less than for the corporate world.
    .
    I agree. And I've done a bunch of boxing and other martial arts and I'd never list it on a resume, most people that I work with don't even have any idea. My workplace is pretty PC and if you said anything other than "oh I go to a gym" people would probably be concerned. While I love boxing, I can't see any connection on how it would help show you as a person who could excel in dealing with complaining users (minus the obvious "deal with" hah)

    Others input is good on the resume format, focus on what you can do for the specific role. There are tons of entry level jobs in that area, I know plenty of people that work there and can barely fill helpdesk with decent employees. Even looking at the summary, you're saying IT, networking and security, but really I imagine you're going for a helpdesk type job to start? If so then tailor your resume to the idea that you handle customers and interactions well, because outside of tech skills, that's what people are looking for in an entry level support type position. 

    Because of the layout in the resume my eye tends to ignore the sidebar, which is really the only technical portion you have, so you want to move it to something that flows better and highlights tech and customer service skills. 

    I disagree with getting rid of education, skills and home lab though. You're actively enrolled, there is nothing wrong with listing a start date and a potential end date, it shows drive. People have different feelings on home labs being listed, but if you have zero IT experience, I want to see someone who has interest and passion, and a home lab shows that. 
  • shochanshochan Member Posts: 958 ■■■■■■■□□□
    2021 Goal ~ OSCP

    Urban Achiever~ A+, Network+, i-Net+, MCP 70-210, CNA v5, Server+, Security+, Cloud+, CySA+
    A.A.S - CIS
  • Mr.Robot255Mr.Robot255 Member Posts: 196 ■■■□□□□□□□
    My input is minimal , but on all the Jobs you have listed just cement in the fact they are customer focused jobs, dealing with customers is what they wanna see imo not that you can lay a floor.
    I was in same boat as you i come from a construction background i found it hard to get an interview until i got the CCNA, you might wanna take a job in a call centre or a customer support type role even if non technical. It will at least show them you deal with customers on a daily basis and maybe get you the interview you do want. Also for each job you apply for tailor your CV to suit what they are looking for.

    If they mention key words in their advert then be sure to try and touch on them in your CV if possible.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    What am I going to tell them I was doing from 2007-2011 when I was a professional fighter and all I was doing was fighting and teaching? I was sponsored and did not require having a job.
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • Mr.Robot255Mr.Robot255 Member Posts: 196 ■■■□□□□□□□
    i see nothing wrong in being a professional boxer/owner , i would state that you also help teach kids boxing maybe focus on that.
  • EANxEANx Member Posts: 1,078 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Your resume goes back to Jan 2011, eight years. I'd be surprised if you lost an interview because you didn't go back ten years. Lots of people have really basic jobs they leave off their resume early in their working career. If they do bring the topic up in the interview because of your age, you could feel out how well to respond based on comfort level with the interviewers. Probably with a light comment on "I was trying to be a professional athlete".
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,772 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I don't think I am a great person to post a critique I can't even get my own resume finished but I will let you know what I see. Since the jobs are not technical you want to make them secondary. Perhaps start with a bullet list of skills. As others said emphasize customer service experience and then technical training.

    I wonder how your resume is being read by online sites. To test this myself I created a job posting on Indeed then submitted my resume allowing the site to convert it. When I received the potential candidate email I noticed that several sections were just dropped off of my resume during the conversion. It might help to have a simple rich text version for online submission. You can always bring a designed version to interviews.

    As the the boxing I really don't know how that plays out in the corporate world. I would say that athletics requires dedication and so you can point to that mental focus that might be transferable to your new career.

    Good Luck! Keep us posted on your progress. Learning is continual and what works for you might help others.
  • mikey88mikey88 CISSP, CySA+, Security+, Network+ and others Member Posts: 494 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Go to volunteermatch.org and find a tech related volunteering gig. You need something to pad your resume a bit. Are you working with IT temp agencies? If not, you should as it's the easiest way to break into IT.

    TEKsystems, Apex Systems, Robert Half etc
    Certs: CISSP, CySA+, Security+, Network+ and others | 2019 Goals: Cloud Sec/Scripting/Linux

  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014, CSM Member Posts: 2,655 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited March 2019
    After reviewing your resume here are my thoughts, take them with a grain of salt.   

    I think the boxing effort could be hurting you.  First it looks like you are really committed to this boxing gym and that this is merely a side job for you.  I would remove it and only list the 3 positions, floor tech, pressman and inventory.  

    Under education you have western governors bold, why not format it like the rest of your resume?

    Change the bullets to match up to an IT job.  For instance, for flooring tech.  You may want to talk about how you solve problems using analytical thinking when measuring floors.  Using math etc....   This will come across a lot more useful than sanding and refinishing floors although I think skilled labor is amazing. 

    Either list Python or don't, but remove willing to deep dive, comes off desperate.  

    Sorry out of order, but your professional summary comes off like you want to be an astronaut.  I would make note in your summary you are looking for an entry level position in IT to begin your it career path.   Something like that, then you can hopefully grab a technician position or service desk even on contract and begin to get some experience on your resume.  


  • MrsWilliamsMrsWilliams Junior Member Member Posts: 192 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited March 2019
    You mentioned 2 years of studying and education. 

     But, it doesn't look like you have any completed education. Taking classes with no degree = Intern

    A+, Network+, and CCNA are all entry-level certifications to most humans within IT for a few years. The CompTIA CIOS Certification is something recent that CompTIA has implemented. I am sure most people/recruiters don't know what it is or know what it means. I have no idea if it includes X, Y, and Z Cert. I would have had to google it, if you hadn't listed it. . . 

    You have, broad range of knowledge in IT infrastructure platforms while building and maintaining healthy relationships-- If you have never had an IT job working on IT infrastructure platforms, who have you built a healthy relationship with, yourself? Nothing in your bullets say anything about infrastructure. So, either you are talking about your home lab, or it never happened and it's a fluff of the resume. 

    I personally don't count inventory and print registration as an IT job. I am not saying it isn't I am just saying I don't count it. Most organizations are not hiring someone to do an inventory, unless it a quick 90 day gig. 

    Three (entry-level) certifications in 24 months (2 years) isn't something to brag/complain about. 

    You are still doing flooring and boxing. If I seen your resume and IF you were qualified I would not hire you. You know why? Because you can't stay late. You can't come in early. You might come to work late. You might leave early. You might be on your phone for hours upon a time. You have other obligations Mister. You have to much going on to adequately sit at a desk and make sure I continue to have 99.5% uptime. You don't have time for an IT job if you ask me.

    I just gave my opinion. It means nothing. But, it was my honest opinion. I wish you the best!
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Reading feedback and making some changes. 

    Going to check back in later.
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Here is an updated version of my resume.
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I create a revised version with no professional summary, reduced some wording in the job descriptions and spaced everything in work experience by 6pt


    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • shochanshochan Member Posts: 958 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Well, since you were in the military, I would suggest going after your Security+, Cisco CyberOps, or CySA+, since those are DoD certs...You would definitely get scooped up pretty quickly in a gov't IT position.  
    2021 Goal ~ OSCP

    Urban Achiever~ A+, Network+, i-Net+, MCP 70-210, CNA v5, Server+, Security+, Cloud+, CySA+
    A.A.S - CIS
  • EANxEANx Member Posts: 1,078 ■■■■■■■■□□
    You mentioned 2 years of studying and education. 

     But, it doesn't look like you have any completed education. Taking classes with no degree = Intern

    A+, Network+, and CCNA are all entry-level certifications to most humans within IT for a few years. The CompTIA CIOS Certification is something recent that CompTIA has implemented. I am sure most people/recruiters don't know what it is or know what it means. I have no idea if it includes X, Y, and Z Cert. I would have had to google it, if you hadn't listed it. . . 

    You have, broad range of knowledge in IT infrastructure platforms while building and maintaining healthy relationships-- If you have never had an IT job working on IT infrastructure platforms, who have you built a healthy relationship with, yourself? Nothing in your bullets say anything about infrastructure. So, either you are talking about your home lab, or it never happened and it's a fluff of the resume. 

    I personally don't count inventory and print registration as an IT job. I am not saying it isn't I am just saying I don't count it. Most organizations are not hiring someone to do an inventory, unless it a quick 90 day gig. 

    Three (entry-level) certifications in 24 months (2 years) isn't something to brag/complain about. 

    You are still doing flooring and boxing. If I seen your resume and IF you were qualified I would not hire you. You know why? Because you can't stay late. You can't come in early. You might come to work late. You might leave early. You might be on your phone for hours upon a time. You have other obligations Mister. You have to much going on to adequately sit at a desk and make sure I continue to have 99.5% uptime. You don't have time for an IT job if you ask me.

    I just gave my opinion. It means nothing. But, it was my honest opinion. I wish you the best!
    My "honest opinion" is that the quoted post gets close to the bullying line. As a hiring manager, I like to see someone bettering themselves and feel that three certs in three years while working on a degree and working full time shows initiative and the desire to better oneself. I hire people with those personal attributes and my teams excel so I will continue to do so.
  • MrsWilliamsMrsWilliams Junior Member Member Posts: 192 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited March 2019
    EANx said:
    You mentioned 2 years of studying and education. 

     But, it doesn't look like you have any completed education. Taking classes with no degree = Intern

    A+, Network+, and CCNA are all entry-level certifications to most humans within IT for a few years. The CompTIA CIOS Certification is something recent that CompTIA has implemented. I am sure most people/recruiters don't know what it is or know what it means. I have no idea if it includes X, Y, and Z Cert. I would have had to google it, if you hadn't listed it. . . 

    You have, broad range of knowledge in IT infrastructure platforms while building and maintaining healthy relationships-- If you have never had an IT job working on IT infrastructure platforms, who have you built a healthy relationship with, yourself? Nothing in your bullets say anything about infrastructure. So, either you are talking about your home lab, or it never happened and it's a fluff of the resume. 

    I personally don't count inventory and print registration as an IT job. I am not saying it isn't I am just saying I don't count it. Most organizations are not hiring someone to do an inventory, unless it a quick 90 day gig. 

    Three (entry-level) certifications in 24 months (2 years) isn't something to brag/complain about. 

    You are still doing flooring and boxing. If I seen your resume and IF you were qualified I would not hire you. You know why? Because you can't stay late. You can't come in early. You might come to work late. You might leave early. You might be on your phone for hours upon a time. You have other obligations Mister. You have to much going on to adequately sit at a desk and make sure I continue to have 99.5% uptime. You don't have time for an IT job if you ask me.

    I just gave my opinion. It means nothing. But, it was my honest opinion. I wish you the best!
    My "honest opinion" is that the quoted post gets close to the bullying line. As a hiring manager, I like to see someone bettering themselves and feel that three certs in three years while working on a degree and working full time shows initiative and the desire to better oneself. I hire people with those personal attributes and my teams excel so I will continue to do so.
    That is YOU. How many hiring managers exist in the wOrLd?

    I bet you are the type of hiring manager who has HR on speed dial and they know you by name, each time you call every other week to file another report.   :/

  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,772 ■■■■■■■■□□
    That is YOU. How many hiring managers exist in the wOrLd?

    I would guess millions. I am also fairly comfortable saying many of them would love employees that are trying to improve themselves. Changing careers and landing your first job is always challenging. It takes mental strength to persist but also remember nobody was born with experience. Every single experienced person on earth today had to gain it at some point.

    When I was graduating college 25 years ago the same problem came up with everyone. How do I get a job when everyone wants two years experience. From the contact I had with my classmates over the years it appears that every one of them eventually landed a job.
  • EANxEANx Member Posts: 1,078 ■■■■■■■■□□
    MrsWilliams said:
    I bet you are the type of hiring manager who has HR on speed dial and they know you by name, each time you call every other week to file another report.   :/

    Personal attacks show more about the person attacking than they do the person being attacked.
  • PseudonymPseudonym A+, Net+, Sec+, Linux+, ITIL v3, MCITP:EDST/EDA, CCNA R&S/Cyber Ops, MCSA:2008/2012, MCSE:CP&I Member Posts: 341 ■■■■□□□□□□
    EANx said:
    You mentioned 2 years of studying and education. 

     But, it doesn't look like you have any completed education. Taking classes with no degree = Intern

    A+, Network+, and CCNA are all entry-level certifications to most humans within IT for a few years. The CompTIA CIOS Certification is something recent that CompTIA has implemented. I am sure most people/recruiters don't know what it is or know what it means. I have no idea if it includes X, Y, and Z Cert. I would have had to google it, if you hadn't listed it. . . 

    You have, broad range of knowledge in IT infrastructure platforms while building and maintaining healthy relationships-- If you have never had an IT job working on IT infrastructure platforms, who have you built a healthy relationship with, yourself? Nothing in your bullets say anything about infrastructure. So, either you are talking about your home lab, or it never happened and it's a fluff of the resume. 

    I personally don't count inventory and print registration as an IT job. I am not saying it isn't I am just saying I don't count it. Most organizations are not hiring someone to do an inventory, unless it a quick 90 day gig. 

    Three (entry-level) certifications in 24 months (2 years) isn't something to brag/complain about. 

    You are still doing flooring and boxing. If I seen your resume and IF you were qualified I would not hire you. You know why? Because you can't stay late. You can't come in early. You might come to work late. You might leave early. You might be on your phone for hours upon a time. You have other obligations Mister. You have to much going on to adequately sit at a desk and make sure I continue to have 99.5% uptime. You don't have time for an IT job if you ask me.

    I just gave my opinion. It means nothing. But, it was my honest opinion. I wish you the best!
    My "honest opinion" is that the quoted post gets close to the bullying line. As a hiring manager, I like to see someone bettering themselves and feel that three certs in three years while working on a degree and working full time shows initiative and the desire to better oneself. I hire people with those personal attributes and my teams excel so I will continue to do so.
    That is YOU. How many hiring managers exist in the wOrLd?

    I bet you are the type of hiring manager who has HR on speed dial and they know you by name, each time you call every other week to file another report.   :/

    Have I missed something here? Why would he be coming in late and going on his phone? I actually think those 3 certs in 2 years in spare time with no industry experience is really impressive. 
    Certifications - A+, Net+, Sec+, Linux+, ITIL v3, MCITP:EDST/EDA, CCNA R&S/Cyber Ops, MCSA:2008/2012, MCSE:CP&I, RHCSA
    Working on - RHCE
  • PC509PC509 CISSP, CEH, CCNA: Security/CyberOps, Sec+, CHFI, A+, Proj+, Server+, MCITP Win7, Vista, MCP Server 2 Oregon, USMember Posts: 802 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Jon_Cisco said:
    That is YOU. How many hiring managers exist in the wOrLd?

    I would guess millions. I am also fairly comfortable saying many of them would love employees that are trying to improve themselves. Changing careers and landing your first job is always challenging. It takes mental strength to persist but also remember nobody was born with experience. Every single experienced person on earth today had to gain it at some point.

    When I was graduating college 25 years ago the same problem came up with everyone. How do I get a job when everyone wants two years experience. From the contact I had with my classmates over the years it appears that every one of them eventually landed a job.
    For our entry level positions, this is exactly what we like to see if they have little to no experience. The initiative to get out there and learn, get certs, build a home lab, and just be interested in it. I was shocked when we were doing interviews and there were a few people with a lot of experience that would take training, get certs, etc. "if it were required for the job". It was employer paid training and certification. We want people to enjoy the work. 

    I'm not a hiring manager, though. I did get to sit in and do some interviews the past few times we hired, though. Saw a wide range of people. We hired the guys with minimal experience but the drive to want to succeed in this career path. We haven't been let down yet. The one guy we hired is a workhorse, and I'm sure he'll be moving up. The guy is dedicated. Extremely fast learner. He came from the warehouse doing forklift work, inventory, etc..

    When looking through some threads and posts, this doesn't seem to be a rare thing, either. A lot of people changing careers get the leg up by home labs, certs, some classes, etc.. That's the advice from a lot of people just starting out in this field, too. 

    At this point, I'd be going to job fairs and talking to people and focus on networking (people, not equipment). Blindly sending out resumes can only do so much. Get out there and meet some people, go to some Meetups for various things, user groups, etc.. Not only will you be building relationships for your entry level position, but you'll keep those relationships for future positions and they'll know your skillset and can give recommendations, etc..
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, Querying Microsoft SQL Server 2012/2014, CSM Member Posts: 2,655 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Put the degree above the new horizon certificate.  Million times better, you'll get hits if you apply for entry level positions.  
  • Neil86Neil86 Member Member Posts: 175 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited March 2019
    I'm not a hiring manager, but I am approaching 2 years into my first IT job. I studied a lot on resume building, used resume building resources (college, etc.), and really worked on creating my resume to appeal to those I was applying to. I also had no actual IT experience, no certs, just a 2 year networking degree, but I was familiar with Cisco, basic networking, and computer stuff. I also got my first job in another state 3000 miles away (looking to relocate there). I knew I had to blow others (in state) out of the water when it came to my resume and cover letter. And it worked.

    So, you have some military IT work experience, you're familiar with Office, various OS's, a major player in IT, and mobile devices. You have some great certs and education, and I'm sure you have gained some great soft skills working those jobs. Put major emphasis on those. Employers don't just want someone who knows there stuff, but will also work great with their team/culture/etc. You're obviously willing to learn new skills too.

    It's not the worst resume I've seen, but it's not the best (I am no professional at all either). You really have to look at your resume from the hiring managers POV. Get friends to look at it, family, coworkers, college resource center, anyone. Get as much feedback as you can. Understand that the hiring manager will sort through tons of resumes and you need to get your skills to them quick and sell yourself fast. I used to use tons of bullets. I lost all of them except for a few in a small skills sections. Instead I opted for a small paragraph under each job. I am personally not a fan of the split page set up. It's making my eyes wander a little. I stick with top to bottom, left to right. Put the most important info at the top since they will read that first. Keep it simple, but precise as well (I had trouble with that at first). Don't lie on the resume, but you have to glam it up. Be confident! I like using a professional summary, but more than two sentences. Are two sentences all you need to sum you up? I doubt it.

    I'm happy to share mine with you privately, be an extra set of eyes, or share some feedback with you.

    Check out some non-profits in your area. That's where I work and I have gotten way, way more experience as an entry-level job than I ever thought I would.

    Hope that helps. Just gotta keep on keepin' on.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks I'm waiting for WGU to get back to me then I will be back with something better hopefully 
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • kaijukaiju Member Posts: 422 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Bullets for the present job are written in the present tense while the remaining entries are written in the past tense.

    All bullets should be actions and not comments.
    Examples from the second job entry:
    - Consistently improve production quality.
    - Improved production quality consistently. (Corrected. But how was this done?)
    - Improved production quality by streamlining processes.

    - Effectively communicated with managers and supervisors.
    - Communicated effectively with managers and supervisors. (Corrected. But what did you communicate?)
    - Communicated customer needs, feedback and issue resolution effectively with managers and supervisors.



    Be consistent with punctuation, capitalization and acronyms.
    - Either use ending punctuation on all bullets or none at all.
    - All bullets should start with a capital letter.
    - Spell out the acronym once as soon as possible and then use the acronym from that point on.

    Work smarter NOT harder! Semper Gumby!
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    ok I have something worth using now I really appreciate the help everyone it was HUUUGGEEE
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • BlucodexBlucodex OSCP, GCIA, GCIH, GMON, CISSP, CEH, CHFI, CCNA CyberOps, Security+ Member Posts: 430 ■■■■□□□□□□
    ok I have something worth using now I really appreciate the help everyone it was HUUUGGEEE
    Have you looked locally at meetups?  You should start associating with people in the industry you want to get into.  Easy way to land a job.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm in a dead zone I need to move.

    Since the resume revision I've had 2 interviews so hopefully something lands.
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Member Posts: 395 ■■■□□□□□□□
    So the effort is already paying off. Some positive messages and thumbs up on Zip recruiter (hopefully can convert to interview) and 2 actual interviews already

    Well worth the effort
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
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