Resumes.... list non-technical experience? yes or no

Just a quick poll that I wanted to get started to see if it's necessary to list non-resume experience for those without technical experience.

Or basically for those without technical experience should one just leave the exp part empty.


thanks

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    I would not leave it empty. Even if you have only had non technical jobs these still show that you have responsability and are depenbale. You should probably highlight all the areas of responsability and accomplishments to show that you can excel in your career even if it wasn't with IT at the time.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • NinjaBoyNinjaBoy Member Posts: 968
    I would actually list non-technical stuff, IT jobs now-a-days require soft-skills as well as tehcnical skills.

    -Ken
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,076 Admin
    Don't list interests and hobbies that don't relate to the job description(s) that your are applying for. Employers aren't impressed by hobbies like rock climbing and desert mountain biking unless they relate to their job offering. Listing anything that suggests you might be prone to injury or Monday/Friday absenteeism is a definite no-no.
  • sir_creamy_sir_creamy_ Inactive Imported Users Posts: 298
    JDMurray wrote:
    Don't list interests and hobbies that don't relate to the job description(s) that your are applying for. Employers aren't impressed by hobbies like rock climbing and desert mountain biking unless they relate to their job offering. Listing anything that suggests you might be prone to injury or Monday/Friday absenteeism is a definite no-no.


    I disagree. Use the hobbies and interests section to showcase your dynamic lifetstyle. Numerous psychological studies have shown that interviewers will make biased decisions based on traits that have absolutely nothing to do with your qualifications. So, if you list "eXtreme noodle eating" as an interest and your interviewer just happens to be the world champion of noodle eating, you're set. Of course, this could work against you, but I have found in my own experience that unique hobbies and interests tickle prospective employers in the right way.
    Bachelor of Computer Science

    [Forum moderators are my friends]
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,076 Admin
    Of course, this could work against you, but I have found in my own experience that unique hobbies and interests tickle prospective employers in the right way.
    You hit the nail on the head: the interpretation of anything on a resume is purely subjective on the part of the reader. In my personal experience as a resume reader, I think the presence of superfluous hobbies on a resume is more likely to cost you the chance at an interview than to get one. Especially if the hobbies listed are very time-intensive or are typically associated with absenteeism. Prospective employers don't like to read/hear things that would indicate you'd be less than 100% available for work.
  • NetstudentNetstudent Member Posts: 1,693 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I like including phrases like Responsible for.......or the like. then at least you can exude some responsibility along with whatever technical role you were responsible for.

    I also like mentioning good communication skills with superiors, end users and co-wrkers. OF course if you don't have good verbal communication skills then don't include it because that will be the first thing an interviewer will pick up in an interview.


    Another thing i like to include are traits that show initiative like

    Prepared plans for network optimization. Almost any admin has thought about things that could improve the system. If you have put something together or had conversation with your boss about something you wanted to implemement, then that shows initiative.

    You can interweave your softskills into your technical skills and I think that is key.
    There is no place like 127.0.0.1 BUT 209.62.5.3 is my 127.0.0.1 away from 127.0.0.1!
  • brad-brad- Member Posts: 1,218
    i have included them on mine in the past...though non-technical, its worth something to let them know other employers have trusted or empowered you to do something...it shows proven responsibility...and leadership if you had any.
  • PashPash Member Posts: 1,600 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I am with JD on this, 9 times outta 10 if an interviewer is interested in what you might do out of work to occupy your time then he/she will ask you, you most deffinately shouldnt put your hobbies and interests on your technical resume.

    However, I think it go's to far in saying an interviewer would expect 100% availability to the job, people have family and also have to wind down somehow. I think it's always best to say you are available for overtime and out of hours work with advanced notice.....this is perfectly reasonable.
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • 147147 Member Posts: 117
    Use the hobbies and interests section to showcase your dynamic lifetstyle.

    I once had an opening for a entry level plant operator where one applicant listed in his hobbies section "Tai-Kwon-Do, Ju-Jitsu and Karate" and proceeded to list his belts in each class....um...yeah. With my management style, the last thing I need is a guy who can break my legs after I write him up.

    I'm not going to say that you should NEVER list your hobbies and interests, but WOW do you need to think it through first (for example, if it doesn't apply to the job, NO ONE CARES- seriously).
    Fear is the absence of Faith.
  • KasorKasor Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yes and No.

    If you don't have much experience in the IT field. You need something to fill the space on your resume.

    If you already have enough experience on a page. You don't really list them unless it is absolutely need it.
    Kill All Suffer T "o" ReBorn
  • SchluepSchluep Member Posts: 346
    147 wrote:
    Use the hobbies and interests section to showcase your dynamic lifetstyle.

    I once had an opening for a entry level plant operator where one applicant listed in his hobbies section "Tai-Kwon-Do, Ju-Jitsu and Karate" and proceeded to list his belts in each class....um...yeah. With my management style, the last thing I need is a guy who can break my legs after I write him up.

    I'm not going to say that you should NEVER list your hobbies and interests, but WOW do you need to think it through first (for example, if it doesn't apply to the job, NO ONE CARES- seriously).

    Again it will come down to the person reading it. I find that many practitioners of Martial Arts have a lot of discipline and a strong work ethic. Of course it doesn't mean everyone will be that way, however I find it to be a much higher percentage among this crowd (along with many Veterans as well). Listing it as you described just sounds plain corny however, so if you are going to list something non-technical it definitely needs to be done appropriately. Regardless of how well it is listed though, it will all come down to the reader.

    While it is certainly more common, not everyone wants to see a short resume for example. That doesn't neccessarily mean you should make yours longer however. You can't write a resume that will please everyone.
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