Displaying certifications on business card?

aidan80aidan80 Member Posts: 147
My question is how did you or do you present yourself on a business card? I’m planning on picking up some customers and exploring the opportunities for a small business. I’ve done my A+, N+, MCP 70-270.. back home a did a few other things3x NVQ’s (1 year each in a classroom/on the job), ICDL/ECDL.. etc I’ve about 5 solid years worth of experience working every day 9 – 5 and after hours as a technician. I was a technician with my last employer 2000 – 2005. I’m not an IT person with my current employer although I do some technical work and do use a range of IT skills daily.

I don’t want to over represent myself or under represent myself on the card.. I’m thinking of putting first name last name and under that a title.. IT Technician? Network Technician? IT Professional?.. etc if you where me what would be the most balanced thing to put on there? I’m planning on using the A+, N+ and MCP Logo but keeping everything else quite minimal on my card. I’m thinking the logos would look better than listing my name then putting A+, N+, MCP after it. I’ve seen it done with other people and they listed too much it made it look too much? Although that isn’t really that much to list under my name?

Any suggestions or comments would be welcome!
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Comments

  • ULWizULWiz Member Posts: 722
    Nothing wrong with adding all the logos for A+, Net+ and MCP on a business card. I personally have my own home based computer LLC company and have all my logos on my business cards. If your interested in seeing how mine looks i will be happy to send it to you. Shoot me a email at [email protected].
    CompTIA A+ Nov 25, 1997
    CompTIA Network+ March 7, 2008
    MCTS Vista 620 June 14, 2008
    MCP Server 290 Nov 15, 2008
    MCP Server 291 In Progress (Exam 12/28/09)
    Cisco CCENT In Progress
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    C|EH In Progress
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Member Posts: 2,077 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Unless it's a higher level (CCIE, MCA, MCM etc),cert I wouldn't bother.
    -Daniel
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I could see it being useful to put them on a personal/free-lance business card. Anything that makes you look more credible/experienced will help.

    Like Daniel, I wouldn't use them on a professional business card though.
  • aidan80aidan80 Member Posts: 147
    Thanks for the responses. Yes it is just freelance at the minute picking up some clients here and there to see if there’s a base for my services in this area before making it official. I plan on displaying that I’m certified/qualified to do the work I mean it’s not rocket science to clean out an infected machine or reimage it or setup a small home network. Fairly easy entry level type stuff. I suppose am trying to find the best way to show the customer that I’m experienced, certified and qualified without making it look like too much to them and without selling myself short. I’ll use the CompTIA logos and the MCP but don’t think I’ll list it all after my name. I suppose my only issue is what is best to describe myself?

    I interviewed for a job one time and the lead IT guy’s email signature is what really put me off displaying everything, it’s just too much? The guy had his name then beside it listed every certification he had? I mean if you’re gone to MSCA/MCSE or CCIE level is there a point listing the A+, N+ and every MCP you did along the way and the MCSA then the MCSE? I didn’t get the job needless to say I think our personalities clashed right away.

    Thanks Ulwis I think I’ll take a look at your card see how you did it! I’ll send you an email, thanks!
  • unsupportedunsupported Member Posts: 192
    aidan80 wrote: »
    Thanks for the responses. Yes it is just freelance at the minute picking up some clients here and there to see if there’s a base for my services in this area before making it official. I plan on displaying that I’m certified/qualified to do the work I mean it’s not rocket science to clean out an infected machine or reimage it or setup a small home network. Fairly easy entry level type stuff. I suppose am trying to find the best way to show the customer that I’m experienced, certified and qualified without making it look like too much to them and without selling myself short. I’ll use the CompTIA logos and the MCP but don’t think I’ll list it all after my name. I suppose my only issue is what is best to describe myself?

    I interviewed for a job one time and the lead IT guy’s email signature is what really put me off displaying everything, it’s just too much? The guy had his name then beside it listed every certification he had? I mean if you’re gone to MSCA/MCSE or CCIE level is there a point listing the A+, N+ and every MCP you did along the way and the MCSA then the MCSE? I didn’t get the job needless to say I think our personalities clashed right away.

    Thanks Ulwis I think I’ll take a look at your card see how you did it! I’ll send you an email, thanks!

    IMHO, the IT lead is a bit full of himself. There is no need to list all the MCP and sub-certifications on the way to a main certification. If you are a CCIE, then just list CCIE, not CCENT, CCNA, etc. Or if you are an MSCA, no need to list MCP, MCSE, those are all stepping stones. On my signature I just have CISSP and CEH. I will probably replace my CEH with my GCIH when I get it. Having a huge sig line with my CISSP, CEH, Security+, Network+, MCP is a little much. If and when I ever get business cards, either personally or through my company I would also not leave off the low hanging fruit and stick with CISSP, CEH, and GCIH. Otherwise I would end up filling up the reverse of my business card with all the certs.

    I also would go with the simple way of displaying a business card. KISS. No logos or anything fancy. Just the facts. Unless you get one of those lock-pick metal business cards or something.
    -un

    “We build our computer (systems) the way we build our cities: over time, without a plan, on top of ruins” - Ellen Ullman
  • astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I also would go with the simple way of displaying a business card. KISS. No logos or anything fancy. Just the facts. Unless you get one of those lock-pick metal business cards or something.
    I love those things :)

    metalcardprices.jpgMiniMetalPreview.jpgColoredMetalPrices.jpgGTROCThumb.jpg
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    aidan80 wrote: »
    I suppose my only issue is what is best to describe myself?

    SOHO IT Consultant, perhaps?

    Astorrs: I love me some metal cards as well!
  • AldurAldur Juniper Moderator Member Posts: 1,460
    wow, how much do those metal business cards cost?
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
  • astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Aldur wrote: »
    wow, how much do those metal business cards cost?
    They're very expensive. Typically between $1.50 and $7.00 EACH depending on quantity.

    But I guess that's okay if you're handing them out to people looking to buy a $400k car. :)
  • AldurAldur Juniper Moderator Member Posts: 1,460
    astorrs wrote: »
    They're very expensive. Typically between $1.50 and $7.00 EACH depending on quantity.

    But I guess that's okay if you're handing them out to people looking to buy a $400k car. :)

    lol, wow, expensive is right, but you got a point there, depends on what your trying to sell.
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Depends on your business.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • Tyrant1919Tyrant1919 Senior Member Member Posts: 519 ■■■□□□□□□□
    If I were to consider putting anything on a business card, I would probably just do MCSE. That's it. Actually, I made a card for fun in publisher, I'll show you what I had in mind for a card when I get home.

    Kinda like how I try to keep my certificate field simple after Dynamik yelled at me one day. icon_cry.gif
    A+/N+/S+/L+/Svr+
    MCSA:03/08/12/16 MCSE:03s/EA08/Core Infra
    CCNA
  • astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Tyrant1919 wrote: »
    Kinda like how I try to keep my certificate field simple after Dynamik yelled at me one day. icon_cry.gif
    Guess I'm next on his list, I just added a bunch of mine back in on the left. icon_redface.gif

    With that said I don't list a single cert on my business cards and only a handful on my resume (no MCTS sub-cert details and never any predecessor certs). But if I was early on in my career or lacking work experience I would probably approach this differently. I do list most of them (including MCTS sub certs on my LinkedIn profile)
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    There is no need to list all the MCP and sub-certifications on the way to a main certification. If you are a CCIE, then just list CCIE, not CCENT, CCNA, etc. Or if you are an [MCSE], no need to list MCP, [MCSA], those are all stepping stones.

    I agree with this thought-process. I have yet to see a PhD list a Bachelor's degree on their business card, and certainly haven't seen one list an Associate's degree if they came up through the community-college-transfer route. Why would you list your entry or mid-level certs on your business card when you have the pro or expert-level certification to display? The knowledge and experience those lower-level certs bring is assumed if you've got a CCIE, MCSE, MCITP, etc.

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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Aldur wrote: »
    wow, how much do those metal business cards cost?

    Business Cards by PlasmaDesign

    Metal and Plastic Business Cards US Price List

    Those plastic ones are still pretty BA and are much more affordable (especially in quantity).
  • Tyrant1919Tyrant1919 Senior Member Member Posts: 519 ■■■□□□□□□□
    If I knew enough people to justify getting 500 of those translucent cards, I would totally get them. Make some cool logo, put some information that should never change like my website and e-mail address. Possibly phone depending on my likelyhood of it changing. There, I have enough business cards to give out to people for some time.

    After thinking about it, I don't think I could throw away a plastic card of that size. I use them for anything. "Thanks Daryle and your awesome plastic business card! You helped scrap my caulking lines straight!"
    A+/N+/S+/L+/Svr+
    MCSA:03/08/12/16 MCSE:03s/EA08/Core Infra
    CCNA
  • AldurAldur Juniper Moderator Member Posts: 1,460
    Tyrant1919 wrote: »
    After thinking about it, I don't think I could throw away a plastic card of that size. I use them for anything. "Thanks Daryle and your awesome plastic business card! You helped scrap my caulking lines straight!"

    I could really see myself using a plastic business card for this purpose
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
  • KasorKasor Member Posts: 919 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Depending on the design and your professional, mostly no, unless you are on the top of the market like: CCIE, CISSP, Encase,..
    Kill All Suffer T "o" ReBorn
  • aidan80aidan80 Member Posts: 147
    Thanks again a lot of useful tips and ideas here! I agree if I worked my way on up the food chain and got the MCSA or MCSE (which is where I’m hoping to go) I’d drop out the A+, N+, MCP.. etc as it would be assumed by any other IT professional that those areas are covered.. Correct about the Dr, I’ve never seen a Dr list everything on their card.. just Dr John Joe Phd, everything below that level is assumed? Makes me think about that guy that interviewed me why he’d list everything like that? Ah well that job wasn’t for me I can’t deal with the nerdy, pushy I know better than you types and if they are like that at interview times what would they be like to work for! I prefer the let’s get the job done and done correctly and professionally, lets learn what we can as we go through it towards the next project.

    I’m going to stick with my three main certifications on the card, A+, N+ and MCP. I’m attaching a sample; you’ll notice the logos are quite large. The reason for this is I’m in Florida and there are lots of people with less than great eyesight lol. I’ve kept it basic and to the point. I may use the SOHO IT Consultant that seems to fit the services that I would provide!

    I found a company Vista Print that actually prints free cards, not quite the nice expensive plastic or metal cards but I may pay and get some cards printed the same as my sample card.

    Let me know what you think!
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Member Posts: 2,621 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I don't put my certifications on my business card because I only go through a box a year and I've already added several certs since January. As soon as you add another cert your card is outdated. Also, it can clutter the card if you have a number of certs.

    I just stick to putting them in my work email signature.

    For your card you should mention a company name, even if you work for yourself. Just check the yellow pages and chose a name that isn't listed. If the business pans out you can register it as an LLC.
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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  • buchatechbuchatech Member Posts: 89 ■■□□□□□□□□
    IMHO, the IT lead is a bit full of himself. There is no need to list all the MCP and sub-certifications on the way to a main certification. If you are a CCIE, then just list CCIE, not CCENT, CCNA, etc. Or if you are an MSCA, no need to list MCP, MCSE, those are all stepping stones. On my signature I just have CISSP and CEH. I will probably replace my CEH with my GCIH when I get it. Having a huge sig line with my CISSP, CEH, Security+, Network+, MCP is a little much. If and when I ever get business cards, either personally or through my company I would also not leave off the low hanging fruit and stick with CISSP, CEH, and GCIH. Otherwise I would end up filling up the reverse of my business card with all the certs.

    I also would go with the simple way of displaying a business card. KISS. No logos or anything fancy. Just the facts. Unless you get one of those lock-pick metal business cards or something.

    Good Points everyone.

    I understand about not listing lower MCP or MCTS certs such as Vista, but what if you have a specialized cert. For example I am going for my MCSA and I got the 70-631 SharePoint 2007 cert as my elective. I would list this on a sig or maybe even a bus card. I would want potential clients to see yes he has MCSA but he also has SharePoint. Is that too much?

    Also what does everyone think of listing cert logo's on a resume? Yes/No?
  • aidan80aidan80 Member Posts: 147
    Well considering the price of a box of cards in fairly low and it’ll be at least two or more exams before I get the MSCA and the other certifications would only be the MCP again I should be alright for the best part of the next year. I’m thinking of taking some online classes in an unrelated field… e.g. GIS which I wouldn’t list on my card anyway. I agree about the clutter I think I’ll leave the A+, N+ and MCP on the card until I get to MSCA level then replace them with that and when I move to MCSE I’d replace the MSCA with that.

    Your right about the company name, I should think up something creative and original and put it on the card. My wife already has an LLC and which didn’t seem to difficult to do I also helped her put up a basic but still a professional looking website. I suppose now the next thing I should do is come up with an original name for this “business” something that sets it apart from the small computer stores that crop up and vanish less than a year later maybe even get some web space and put up some basic information. My wife’s website has actually gotten her quite a bit of business.
  • steve_fsteve_f Member Posts: 97 ■■□□□□□□□□
    My workplace produces business cards for every staff member.

    Initially I wanted MCP, MCDST, MCSA on there (the official logos you download from the MCP member site) but my boss said just to stick MCSA on there and leave off the 2 lesser ones.

    He was right too, 6 months after getting MCSA, I'd feel a bit foolish with MCDST and MCP on there, as I'm trying to distance myself from desktop support and push myself into more sysadmin duties.

    So currently my business cards have my job title (Network Support Technician), the MCSA logo, and the Microsoft Certified Partner logo (employer is a MS partner)
  • skrpuneskrpune Member Posts: 1,409
    buchatech wrote: »
    Also what does everyone think of listing cert logo's on a resume? Yes/No?
    I'm not a fan of putting logos on a resume, but that's just me.
    Currently Studying For: Nothing (cert-wise, anyway)
    Next Up: Security+, 291?

    Enrolled in Masters program: CS 2011 expected completion
  • AldurAldur Juniper Moderator Member Posts: 1,460
    skrpune wrote: »
    I'm not a fan of putting logos on a resume, but that's just me.

    I would have to agree here. I've been told it's ok if you just have one cert but with more then that it tends to really clutter up the resume.

    I would say that it's best practices to just list your certs on your resume and leave off the logos.
    "Bribe is such an ugly word. I prefer extortion. The X makes it sound cool."

    -Bender
  • aidan80aidan80 Member Posts: 147
    skrpune wrote: »
    I'm not a fan of putting logos on a resume, but that's just me.

    I too thought about using the CompTIA and MCP logo on my CV/Resume but I think I’d go against it now. Instead I’d just include a copy of my transcript from Microsoft which displays what certifications I hold including the A+ and N+.
  • apena7apena7 Member Posts: 351
    I too tend to leave logos off my resume and business cards.
    If anything, I would include logos for things like Craigslist or your own website.
    Usus magister est optimus
  • astorrsastorrs Member Posts: 3,139 ■■■■■■□□□□
    apena7 wrote: »
    If anything, I would include logos for things like Craigslist or your own website.
    huh? why Craigslist?
  • apena7apena7 Member Posts: 351
    Simple.
    Many techs have to do side-jobs on Craiglist or similar sites to keep a steady flow of income (especially if they have been laid-off). Adding a logo there would be appropriate since your audience probably won't know what exactly you're certifications are if you were to just type them out. However, seeing a shiny "Microsoft Certified" logo would help them out somewhat.

    Resumes, business cards, and Craigslist are just advertisements for yourself -- nothing mystical really.
    Usus magister est optimus
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I believe I'm completely with astorrs in thinking that you were saying to include the Craigslist logo on your resume and business cards icon_lol.gif
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