Anyone take the JNCIS-ER via FastTrack?

Bert McGertBert McGert Son of DadMember Posts: 122
I'm on the fence about going after the JNCIS-ER before the Dec 3 retirement date or if I should just focus on the JNCIA hop to the JNCIS-ENT. Do folks think the JNCIS-ER exam is realistic for a CCNP with little Junos experience?

Obviously, it'd be preferable to take one test instead of two, but if the JNCIS-ER is a monster demanding respect, then I'll pay it. If folks think it's doable, I'll go for it. I've never taken a Juniper exam so I don't know what to expect.

I appreciate your insight and/or recommendations.

Comments

  • zoidbergzoidberg A guinea pig tricked me! Member Posts: 365 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Do folks think the JNCIS-ER exam is realistic for a CCNP with little Junos experience?

    I don't really think so. Or at least not without some very solid study. Maybe the JNCIS-M, but that's not around anymore or will soon disappear. I found the JNCIS-ER to be among the more difficult of the exams.
  • zoidbergzoidberg A guinea pig tricked me! Member Posts: 365 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I've never taken a Juniper exam so I don't know what to expect.

    Most find them easier than Cisco. Almost completely multiple choice. No simulations. Wonder if the new ones have sims? That would be cool in the JNCIS-SP. I need to try that soon...
  • TheShadowTheShadow Senior Member Member Posts: 1,057 ■■■■■■□□□□
    JNCIS-ER gave me new respect for just how different Juniper is from Cisco. I would not take it lightly if you intend to skip the IA. As zoidberg said it will take some solid study or else about 5 questions in you will start to get that sinking feeling as your shoes start to feel squishy.

    I definitely had that feeling on JNCIS-SEC even though I passed both versions of the exam, the newer version was more difficult. Based on that experience I expect the new versions of all the exams to take a step up in difficulty even if they do not add simulations to them. At least they will keep the dumpers at bay.

    The IA exams are fairly easy for a Cisco person, the IS versions not so much. The main reason why I have not been in a hurry to jump on the IP is because I have not matched my study plan as fast as I thought. Microsoft doing R2's of everything and .net 4 has slowed me down.
    Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of technology?... The Shadow DO
  • Bert McGertBert McGert Son of Dad Member Posts: 122
    TheShadow wrote: »
    The IA exams are fairly easy for a Cisco person, the IS versions not so much.

    Why do you think that is? I'm curious why the IS tests would be that much worse. My thinking is that once you've got how the various IGP/EGP protocols function, then you've got 75% of it covered and it's just a matter of figuring out how it's done in the OS. Is that not true?
  • TheShadowTheShadow Senior Member Member Posts: 1,057 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Why do you think that is? I'm curious why the IS tests would be that much worse. My thinking is that once you've got how the various IGP/EGP protocols function, then you've got 75% of it covered and it's just a matter of figuring out how it's done in the OS. Is that not true?

    Juniper does not seem to have a middle ground. The IA exams surround networking basics that are common to all vendors sort of like rubbing two sticks together to start a fire. The next step then becomes their version of building a forge. You are saying 75/25, I might reverse those two percentages but I would have to spend time refining the values.

    The IS exams are generally wide in knowledge but on specific questions for no rhyme or reason they are also deep. Since you have no pre-conception of where the deep parts are you must study for all of them or get lucky. The exams tend to have several very close answers which require the wide part and occasionally the deep part.

    By taking the IA exams you get a good feel of where the deep parts might be. If you skip the IA exams then you may be at a disadvantage. I am not saying that you can't do it nor do I believe zoidberg is either. I am just saying don't underestimate them based solely on your Cisco background.

    Take the prepardness exam on fast track and then bump up that level of difficulty. It will give you some feel for it. If that exam does not make you 100 percent comfortable or you miss some questions and you have no idea why then more deep dive study is required.

    Then again you may just blaze through them, I after all have been recovering from a minor brain injury for several years which causes slight memory ticks. They are less and less now but it is what it is, which is why I do not post on more topics.
    Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of technology?... The Shadow DO
  • Bert McGertBert McGert Son of Dad Member Posts: 122
  • zoidbergzoidberg A guinea pig tricked me! Member Posts: 365 ■■■■□□□□□□
    The JNCIS-ER goes beyond just understanding knobs on BGP. It covers a lot of services and features that, even for those with a JUNOS background, can be a bit of a mess to fully understand.

    Juniper-wise, I rate the JNCIS-ER among the hardest they offer. Now, you may feel different, it's all experience and exposure. I thought the JNCIS-M and JNCIS-SEC were pretty easy. It's all about background.

    For someone starting fresh to JUNOS, expect it to take some work. But you have good resources in the FastTrack and the JUNOS Enterprise Routing books. If you're serious about, you can definitely do it.
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