Lost and Confused

Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
Here is a little background on me.

I am currently 22 years old and am a junior tentatively majoring in Computer Science. I transferred from a local community college with my A.A. degree. I am having a very difficult time trying to solidify my major. I know I want to work in the I.T. field. I always enjoyed my Computer classes in high school (A+,Web Design, Networking etc). I am still living at home with my parents. I should be done with college by now, but I am not because I took 2 years off after high school because I was unsure if I was even going to attend college. I am likely not going to graduate until I am 25-26 which scares me. I want to get on with my life and move out into the real world. I wish I went to college immediately after high school, but there's nothing I can do about that now.

Computer Science seemed like the go-to degree for someone interested in computers. I then found out it revolves mainly around programming. I have yet to take a programming course because Calc 1 is a pre-requisite. I am also unsure if I will even enjoy it. The concept of programming sounds very interesting, but I don't know if I want to program for the rest of my life. It seems very tedious and would require plenty of patience. Does Computer Science revolve mainly around programming? I have heard I could pretty much get any I.T. job with a Computer Science degree. It just seems like the CS degree is primarily geared towards programming. The required math is also VERY intimidating. I currently only have a C in my Calc 1 course. I have to go through Calc 1-3, Physics 1-2, Engineering Statistics and Linear Systems.

There is also an Information Systems degree from the school of Engineering. What exactly is different from this degree compared to computer science? There were a couple different courses from CS, but it primarily looks the same. The IS degree had a couple business courses, but it is still an engineering degree.

There is also a regular B.S. in Information Technology degree, but unfortunately it is only offered online. I feel this is a safe route, but it would severely impact my college experience by taking online courses only.

I have been considering swapping to an MIS (Management Information Systems) major. My primary concerns are that this is a management business major from the school of business. I am looking more towards working in Networkin Analyst/Admin, Systems Analyst, and other various I.T. jobs (What other I.T. specific jobs are there? I know there are a ton more, but I am blanking out). Would companies look down on an MIS degree if I want to pursue a technical job? I feel like the MIS major is geared to management in the I.T. field. I don't know if this is much of a technical degree as it pertains to managing a group of I.T. professionals. Could I get a technical job with an MIS degree or will they mostly be business related jobs in an I.T. field?

I seriously get sick to my stomach whenever I think about this. I am constantly stressed every day and feel like I need to make up my mind over this major. I feel depressed whenever I think about it. I feel like this is a huge decision which will impact the rest of my life and it scares the hell out of me. I hate thinking about it due to the way it makes me feel. Like aforementioned, I am currently a Junior. I don't have ANY time left. I need to decide for sure or I am going to waste a lot of time and money. I wish I was still a freshman and had time to decide. I am extremely lost right now. I don't know what I.T. degree is right for me. I can never get this off my mind. I feel like I hate my life right now being in college. I feel like I would be extremely happy if I could simply decide my major 100% and stick with it. I will not leave college without a degree. The question is which degree?

Any advice would mean the world to me. I am at a crossroads of what to do. Thank you so much guys for any input you can give me! It means a lot.

Comments

  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    First off welcome to TE!
    I understand your confusion. Being in IT doesn't necessarilly require an IT degree although it helps. Have you tried to get any experience in IT yet as that would help you to decide what you might want to do. The comp sci degree will not limit you to being just a programmer but will give you the ability to tackle any programming task that may come up or to troubleshoot a programming related issue that may come up. You will, in IT, have to learn at least some basic programming skills. The Comp Sci degree will give you the biggest breadth of possibilities when you complete college.
    If the math is such a big barrier for you then the MIS may be a good alternative as you can counter the non technical aspect by perhaps taking a more technical minor or even just getting a few IT certs.
    Oh yeah, did I mention trying to get some experience? However you can get it; interning, co-op program, work study, volunteering, maybe even get a helpdesk job.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Can I get technical jobs with an MIS degree? Or will an MIS degree only give me business related jobs within the IT sector?
  • ehndeehnde Posts: 1,103Member
    After reading your entire post, I feel like you could do with a paradigm shift, a sense of "focus" & "rightness". Have you ever heard it said that perception is 9/10ths of reality?

    Many of the statements you made were something like "I feel like" or "Would an employer look down on me". You are clearly very worried, anyone can see that.

    This is how I see your options:

    1. Stick with the programming degree, hire a tutor if you have to so that you can get through the math. Programming can be a great deal of fun! Some of the most successful people in I.T. are self-educated and self-starters. Don't wait for someone to teach you programming. Most programming professors I have are horrible. Teach yourself! Try out python, here is an excellent source to begin learning a language. How to Think Like a Computer Scientist — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python v2nd Edition documentationif you learn one language very well, you can easily transfer your knowledge to other languages with less effort. After gaining some experience with whatever language you choose, volunteer for an open source project on sourceforge.net This is a GREAT way to gain experience and can go on your resume.
    2. We're all about getting certified on here. If you feel you are not programming oriented, you can work on getting certified with Microsoft, Cisco, CompTIA, or any other number of vendors. All of these companies have what most employers to be very valuable certifications that have nothing to do with programming.
    I'm older than you, unemployed, have not finished my degree, and have no certifications. I'm not worried! When you finish your degree, you will have a job. If you change your degree program, yes, you will be able to get a technical job working with computers. I think a larger source of your worry is that you just aren't sure what's out there. There is more out there than you think icon_wink.gif

    Don't forget what I said. Perception is 9/10ths of reality. If you change the way you see things it can make a load of difference. This doesn't usually happen over night. Think positive!
    Climb a mountain, tell no one.
  • Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    ehnde wrote: »
    After reading your entire post, I feel like you could do with a paradigm shift, a sense of "focus" & "rightness". Have you ever heard it said that perception is 9/10ths of reality?

    Many of the statements you made were something like "I feel like" or "Would an employer look down on me". You are clearly very worried, anyone can see that.

    This is how I see your options:

    1. Stick with the programming degree, hire a tutor if you have to so that you can get through the math. Programming can be a great deal of fun! Some of the most successful people in I.T. are self-educated and self-starters. Don't wait for someone to teach you programming. Most programming professors I have are horrible. Teach yourself! Try out python, here is an excellent source to begin learning a language. How to Think Like a Computer Scientist — How to Think Like a Computer Scientist: Learning with Python v2nd Edition documentationif you learn one language very well, you can easily transfer your knowledge to other languages with less effort. After gaining some experience with whatever language you choose, volunteer for an open source project on sourceforge.net This is a GREAT way to gain experience and can go on your resume.
    2. We're all about getting certified on here. If you feel you are not programming oriented, you can work on getting certified with Microsoft, Cisco, CompTIA, or any other number of vendors. All of these companies have what most employers to be very valuable certifications that have nothing to do with programming.
    I'm older than you, unemployed, have not finished my degree, and have no certifications. I'm not worried! When you finish your degree, you will have a job. If you change your degree program, yes, you will be able to get a technical job working with computers. I think a larger source of your worry is that you just aren't sure what's out there. There is more out there than you think icon_wink.gif

    Don't forget what I said. Perception is 9/10ths of reality. If you change the way you see things it can make a load of difference. This doesn't usually happen over night. Think positive!

    I am trying my absolute hardest to be positive. I would be ecstatic once I can solidify this decision. I have been unhappy ever since I started school again. Yes, I suffer from a GREAT deal of stress. It is somewhat ruining my life. I have been very unhappy lately. I thoroughly enjoyed having this past summer off and not even thinking about school. It was one of the greatest summers of my life. College itself doesn't stress me out, but trying to decide my major is. It never leaves my mind. I can't even have a good time anymore. I am always thinking about it. Its almost like a sickness.

    I was looking at the course listing for the MIS degree and there are a LOT of business courses in which I just have no interest in. icon_sad.gif There are computer classes as well, but it seems primarily business related. I also did some research on MIS degree and found a forum which pretty much said its not a great degree. It is half business/half technical without a strong concentration in each.

    My biggest worry is if I do not enjoy programming. If I do not enjoy programming there is no reason to stay in Computer Science, correct?

    There is also the Information Technology degree which I believe would be the perfect degree for me, but like aforementioned it is only available online. I think it would put a great damper on the college experience.

    I guess what worries me is running out of options. I have never been interested in any other majors really. I have always had an interest in the I.T. sector. I definitely want a bachelors degree as well. Everything will work out if I truly enjoy programming, but I somewhat don't think I will enjoy it.

    My friends don't seem to understand what I am going through. Most of them say to relax. They all also know their major 100% so they can't possibly know what I am feeling.

    If I do not enjoy programming then I have no clue what I should do. I do not want to drop out of college. I definitely want a degree like mentioned. icon_sad.gif

    BTW, what are you currently majoring in?
  • ehndeehnde Posts: 1,103Member
    I'm majoring in Network Administration at a community college graduating in May, then transferring to Online University | Online College | Western Governors University

    If you don't like your choices at your current school, have you thought about changing to a school that has a major more aligned with what you want? Yeah, it's a huge change. But something to think about!

    Pretty much any action you take is 100% better than doing nothing. You'll feel much better once you decide and commit. You need a plan, man!
    Climb a mountain, tell no one.
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    Computer Science is not a programming degree but yes there is a lot of programming in it.

    Computer Science is an applied computational theory degree. The classes include high level mathematics, programming, computer architecture (not the A+ level), Electronic Principles, Physics, multimedia design and application, internet architecture, security, networking and enterprise operations and deployments. Be careful of what colleges you choose to go to as they say they have a Computer Science degree but all it really turns out to be is a CIS degree.

    Since you are in your Junior Year you are going to start getting into the rough and tumble classes of your major. Since this is stressing you out I suggest looking into a different path.

    For your mindset and your desires you may look into a technical degree with the hard science and math removed such as a BS in IT or CIS.
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
  • Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Chris:/* wrote: »
    Computer Science is not a programming degree but yes there is a lot of programming in it.

    Computer Science is an applied computational theory degree. The classes include high level mathematics, programming, computer architecture (not the A+ level), Electronic Principles, Physics, multimedia design and application, internet architecture, security, networking and enterprise operations and deployments. Be careful of what colleges you choose to go to as they say they have a Computer Science degree but all it really turns out to be is a CIS degree.

    Since you are in your Junior Year you are going to start getting into the rough and tumble classes of your major. Since this is stressing you out I suggest looking into a different path.

    For your mindset and your desires you may look into a technical degree with the hard science and math removed such as a BS in IT or CIS.

    The coursework is not whats stressing me out, but trying to find out what I want to major in is. If I like programming should I definitely stick with CS?

    A big concern is leaving the school of engineering. I feel like I could be much more successful with a degree in Comp Sci(Engineering of course) than a technical degree from a school of business.

    My primary concern is graduating with x degree and wishing I went with a different degree.

    Which degree would look better in the long run? A BS in I.T. or a BA/BS MIS degree?
  • brownwrapbrownwrap Posts: 549Member
    Frankie15 wrote: »
    The coursework is not whats stressing me out, but trying to find out what I want to major in is. If I like programming should I definitely stick with CS?

    A big concern is leaving the school of engineering. I feel like I could be much more successful with a degree in Comp Sci(Engineering of course) than a technical degree from a school of business.

    My primary concern is graduating with x degree and wishing I went with a different degree.

    Which degree would look better in the long run? A BS in I.T. or a BA/BS MIS degree?


    I have worked at a NASA facility for almost 20 years. Not there any longer, but I didn't have a degree. That said, most had degrees, and advanced degrees with many PHDs from MIT and Caltech. I found many people working in computer related fields that had nothing to do with their majors. Many physics major worked in lots of different capacities.

    I have seen mechanical engineers end up working in a computer science field, so the major doesn't necessarily tie you down. And I have seen people with degrees elsewhere who couldn't do their jobs.

    I will say a degree opens doors that won't get opened otherwise. I really made sure my son got his Computer Science degree and it took much longer than you.

    I have seen job openings where they wouldn't even consider you without a degree. So its certainly not going to hurt you.
  • Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    brownwrap wrote: »
    I have worked at a NASA facility for almost 20 years. Not there any longer, but I didn't have a degree. That said, most had degrees, and advanced degrees with many PHDs from MIT and Caltech. I found many people working in computer related fields that had nothing to do with their majors. Many physics major worked in lots of different capacities.

    I have seen mechanical engineers end up working in a computer science field, so the major doesn't necessarily tie you down. And I have seen people with degrees elsewhere who couldn't do their jobs.

    I will say a degree opens doors that won't get opened otherwise. I really made sure my son got his Computer Science degree and it took much longer than you.

    I have seen job openings where they wouldn't even consider you without a degree. So its certainly not going to hurt you.

    I will definitely get a degree in some I.T. related field.

    How long did it take your son to get his CS degree? What age did he start/finish the degree? Did he really enjoy what he was doing? What does he do now?

    Thanks for your input!
  • brownwrapbrownwrap Posts: 549Member
    Frankie15 wrote: »
    I will definitely get a degree in some I.T. related field.

    How long did it take your son to get his CS degree? What age did he start/finish the degree? Did he really enjoy what he was doing? What does he do now?

    Thanks for your input!


    My son live at home as well. Still does, though I moved to another state for work. He finished many more classes than he had to at junior college and took a long time finishing hist degree. He was probably around 30. He does web work, likes Flash and animation. He too, took all of the classes you are talking about, higher level math and physics, and probably doesn't use a whole lot of it.
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    Frankie15 wrote: »
    There is also the Information Technology degree which I believe would be the perfect degree for me, but like aforementioned it is only available online. I think it would put a great damper on the college experience.
    What's more important to you -- a Degree you like that could help you get a job? Or the college experience?

    But you probably do want to learn quickly whether you have the programming gene, if you're good at it, and if you like it before you spends lots of time pursuing a Computer Science Degree.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • ehndeehnde Posts: 1,103Member
    The really important thing about college that alot of people seem to not get (i.e. how many people do you know that have gone to college and never graduated?) is to get in and get out. Down the road not long from now some H.R. goon will look at your resume, they'll see "Bachelors of X" - "*computer*|*technology*" and then look for your other qualifications and hopefully call you for an interview. They'll call you because you finished the degree. Don't waste any more time than you have to getting a degree!
    Climb a mountain, tell no one.
  • PlantwizPlantwiz Posts: 5,057Mod Mod
    mikej412 wrote: »
    What's more important to you -- a Degree you like that could help you get a job? Or the college experience?

    But you probably do want to learn quickly whether you have the programming gene, if you're good at it, and if you like it before you spends lots of time pursuing a Computer Science Degree.

    +1


    Frankie15,
    I think your worrying way too much here (which you too seem to have realized). Consider many people pursue multiple degrees or change degree paths and that may not be the right thing for you, but this is why during high school years (a good guidance counselor should...) help you 'test' some of your areas of interest by pointing you toward summer internships, job shadows etc..

    I am puzzled at this comment from you though?
    I am currently 22 years old and am a junior tentatively majoring in Computer Science. I transferred from a local community college with my A.A. degree. I am having a very difficult time trying to solidify my major. I know I want to work in the I.T. field. I always enjoyed my Computer classes in high school (A+,Web Design, Networking etc). I am still living at home with my parents. I should be done with college by now, but I am not because I took 2 years off after high school because I was unsure if I was even going to attend college. I am likely not going to graduate until I am 25-26 which scares me. I want to get on with my life and move out into the real world. I wish I went to college immediately after high school, but there's nothing I can do about that now.

    I don't recall there being an age limit on college? I personally wouldn't want to take longer then 4 years on a 4 year degree. However, I know many who have and I also understand (many years later) there are occasionally circumstances that force a student to take a longer time (and not always by their choice).

    I would think you should be able to pursue some independent study for a course or two, take extra classes each term (semester) to expedite your completion time. However, then you mention the 'college experience'. Either focus on the whole experience or focus on completely your coursework.

    And just a note, you are already in the 'real world'.

    I don't know what sort of magic you think happens after college, but many folks continue with their studies merely to stay current with their respective area of interest (degree).

    If you are a merely classes away form a degree (and I was in your place) I'd finish the degree and at least have something for my time. If I then decided I wanted to add to it, I'd pursue another major, but I'd finish one degree even if I wasn't going to stay in that particular area long-term.

    Do you have an adviser at school you can meet with to discuss this sort of stuff with? I would think he/she has a better way to assist you and help you sort though some of your perceived confusion.

    A degree is like a marker. It shows a person has studied some topic and should have an idea of how to use that knowledge. The caveat is that the degree training, doesn't prepare you to work per se. You need to be a good worker. You need to be resourceful (which you might have this practice during your classes in college). You will need good people skills (generally not something that is taught, but can be polished a little) and you need to be able to generate more money for the company than they pay you (or at least save them more money than they plan on you using).

    I would get with a college adviser as early as tomorrow and see what they might suggest. These people tend to have resources, big picture vision and experience dealing with hundreds of other twenty-somethings thinking life ends if gainful employment doesn't happen the moment the diploma is in hand. You have time.

    Know, you have time.


    Sometimes degrees are a starting point and you end up merging to of your interests into a job because rarely will you find a job that 'only' needs your degree. Depending on the size of the company you work for, you will likely find yourself doing two or three roles assigned to you. Ex. You may like programming + animals + photography. So you may find yourself working at a large zoo as the person who runs a custom app the zoo no longer wishes to out-source and while supporting this app, lets say it takes 60% of your week, you may be also assigned to update the website including photos and installing live camera feeds.

    I'm just putting an example out there, but try to think about this all as an opportunity to something bigger rather than an absolute must do before age 24. Frankly, I"m not hiring someone fresh from college for a project. I might bring them in as an intern and see how they do, but there is still a lot of talent in the market to where I'd work my contacts for candidates first, than move to experienced people with a decent portfolio and good recommendation. It's not to say I'd 'never' hire someone fresh from school, but I've yet to find a candidate who fits the team when they are fresh from school. It could be that the schools are not properly preparing their students on what to expect upon graduation? Not sure what the problem is, but a degree doesn't equal top job...it merely puts the candidate (at most employers) in the consider pile.


    Good luck, and seriously, find a school adviser in the morning and make an appointment to meet with them to discuss your concerns. For myself, I"d finish the path and move on. If I truly wanted to add another degree...its easy to do (I've done it a few times now ;) ).
    Plantwiz
    _____
    "Grammar and spelling aren't everything, but this is a forum, not a chat room. You have plenty of time to spell out the word "you", and look just a little bit smarter." by Phaideaux

    ***I'll add you can Capitalize the word 'I' to show a little respect for yourself too.

    'i' before 'e' except after 'c'.... weird?
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    What I was trying to get across was that Computer Science does not limit you to programming. It really does depend what your end goals are, I personally think Comptuer Science or Electrical Engineering will get you further in the world of electronics and computers.

    If you want to work as a System Admin/Engineer or Network Admin/Engineer than a degree in IT, CIS or MIS will be more than adequate. If you want to be a real Security Analyst then you should really get a degree in Computer Science.

    A degree really does not type cast you into any job it just opens more doors for you.

    Look at your end goals then go search some job sites and see what degrees they prefer for the jobs you want.
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Posts: 1,034Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    What school do you go to?
    tell me more about the BSIT program... does that require all your classes to be online?

    I'm currently working on AA in Networking Technology at the 2yr and will do BS in CIS(networking conc over programming).

    I'm 21 and i wish to be a network tech/admin/engineer...
    ive noticed that all the CS degrees here focus on programming(oh boy) and math(poor at)...and no networking..
    So i chose CIS, theres alot of options on networking and im sure it looks better than CS if i wanna be a network tech. Im going to graduate at 24-25 icon_sad.gif but i will definitely use that time for Certifications and some work experience which go hand in hand in hand with a degree.

    judging from what alot of people say on here, a degree.. or a degree of any sorts shows the hiring manager that you know how to learn and have enough discipline and patience to learn important things on the job.

    get your degree, work experience, and certs. that'll ensure you a good start in IT.
    2019 Goals
    CompTIA Linux+
    [ ] Bachelor's Degree
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    I'm 21 and i wish to be a network tech/admin/engineer...
    ive noticed that all the CS degrees here focus on programming(oh boy) and math(poor at)...and no networking..
    So i chose CIS, theres alot of options on networking and im sure it looks better than CS if i wanna be a network tech. Im going to graduate at 24-25 icon_sad.gif but i will definitely use that time for Certifications and some work experience which go hand in hand in hand with a degree.

    It is sad to see many of the new CS degrees that pop up now adays are all about programming. This really shows that to get a really good science degree it pays to go to a really good school. Too bad that is out of reach of most of us.icon_cry.gif
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Posts: 1,034Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    I live in NYC, and actually im eventually going to be doing a CST degree... dunno if thats any different than a CIS degree.. but its less math and you can choose between programming or networking.

    sorry to hijack a little, but would this be a good option for someone wishing to venture into networking?
    http://www.citytech.cuny.edu/academics/deptsites/cst/programs/btech_cs_course_Fall07.pdf

    and to the OP, show me more about the BSIT online degree option. you still graduate from the actual school right?
    2019 Goals
    CompTIA Linux+
    [ ] Bachelor's Degree
  • Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    First of all, I want to sincerely thank everyone who gave me some insight on my dilemma. I really do appreciate it! I am going to schedule an appointment with an advisor in a few days and really try to narrow this down.

    You do make a good point about the online degree program. It is all about my future and if this is truly the way I want to go then I should pursue it.

    I will have my very first programming course next semester. I do hope I enjoy it. Like mentioned, my biggest fears are the math. I really hope I can conquer all the math if I decide to stick with CS.

    Also, I am at University of South Florida where they administer the online BS IT program. Yes, you graduate from the actual school
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Posts: 1,034Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    ok i see both an BASIT and a BSIT
    not really sure how they differ.... but both say you can do partly or fully online. so im sure you can take as many classes as you want on campus as well. it also shows only 6 credits needed for math and 3 for physics for both.

    b.as USF Polytechnic: General Education Requirements
    bs USF Polytechnic: Program Requirements

    the normal bsit seems to have a set guideline and the b.asIT seems to have a more choose your own path.from the looks of it, it pretty much lets you make your own courses. which is good depending on where you wanna branch off in IT. giving you a head start.
    USF Polytechnic: Program of Study

    also, youre required to take a Networking and Lab class for both which is cool if you wanna do that.
    2019 Goals
    CompTIA Linux+
    [ ] Bachelor's Degree
  • Stiltz79Stiltz79 Posts: 74Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I am 31. I graduated college in 2005 at the age of 25. I didn't even start until I was 23. I have a Associates of Applied Business in Information Technology. I got a job right out of college doing Desktop Support. I took care of all aspects including hardware and software. I was intimidated, trust me. I was one of 13 guys supporting 16,000 computers across 117 buildings in a city. I then moved into a office job doing desktop management and help desk. I now just started a new job as a Intel Server Administrator Trainee. I took a multitude of technical classes in all areas of IT. The Visual Basic class helped me. Even as a System Admin you should know some sort of programming language such as VB or Powershell. Keep your head up and keep pushing forward. This field requires a passion that burns deep inside of you.
  • Frankie15Frankie15 Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I think my main problem is pursuing the IT degree because it is offered only online. For some reason I don't feel like a TRUE college student if I take all my classes online. I only work once a week and I am 22 as I said before. I don't want my parents to think I am mooching off them by being home constantly since I wont need to go to class. I like actually going on campus and meeting new people and such. I wish the I.T. degree was offered on campus!

    My main worry is if CS will be too difficult for me. I hear CS is a very tough major. I am currently in Calc 1 and working extremely hard and only have a C in the course. I have plenty of more difficult math courses in my future as well.

    I also don't know if I will like programming. I like the idea of programming, but I have a feeling once I start typing out lines of code and what not that I will hate it. Most of my friends who also pursued an IT career couldn't stand programming either.

    The meat of the CS degree at my school is programming. It has plenty of other courses, but a lot of them have to do with programming. Would it be the right decision to major in CS IF I DO NOT LIKE programming, but want to still be in the I.T. field? I don't know if I am missing something. Most people who major in CS surely enjoy programming.

    I would love any additional advice. Thanks guys.
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    Just because the version of CS at your school has a lot of programming in it does not mean that you will only qualify for jobs that involve programming. CS opens more doors to jobs than an IT degree does. However that is under the assumption you have take the other classes in the major like microcomputer, network security, networking, data structures and so on.

    If you do not feel you will finish your degree because you will struggle with it I would go with the IT degree.
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
  • EverlifeEverlife Posts: 253Member
    If you're worried about being limited to programming positions with your CS degree, do some self study into Microsoft, Cisco, Linux, and get some certifications. Also, try to find some volunteer jobs or an internship that will allow you to get your feet wet.

    If it makes you feel any better, I have a BS in accounting but everything I've done for the past 6 years is IT-related. Once you get some experience, the degree becomes less important. Some companies just want to see that you have a 4-year degree, and they don't necessarily care what it is in as long as you have the experience to accomplish the tasks the job requires.

    Best of luck!
  • Chris:/*Chris:/* Posts: 658Member
    Everlife wrote: »
    If you're worried about being limited to programming positions with your CS degree, do some self study into Microsoft, Cisco, Linux, and get some certifications. Also, try to find some volunteer jobs or an internship that will allow you to get your feet wet.

    If it makes you feel any better, I have a BS in accounting but everything I've done for the past 6 years is IT-related. Once you get some experience, the degree becomes less important. Some companies just want to see that you have a 4-year degree, and they don't necessarily care what it is in as long as you have the experience to accomplish the tasks the job requires.

    Best of luck!

    This is very true.
    Degrees:
    M.S. Information Security and Assurance
    B.S. Computer Science - Summa Cum Laude
    A.A.S. Electronic Systems Technology
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