I.T. Interview with Non I.T. evaluators

Hi guys! How you doing?
Just wonder if you guys can give me a little insight on the subject.
First of all srry for english, not main language.

What do you do when you interview for such serious positions like network tech or system admin and the people that interview you know **** about it?
I had an interview for a system admin in a university like 3 weeks ago and the people who interviewed me were all teachers or/and faculty members. There wasnt a single IT guy there.
So what we say does really mean anything in the interview? Like going into detail and stuff.
When they ask me something does it really pay off to explain in detail?
Or are they thinking OMG this is boring.

I'm not saying I'm a guru or I'm looking down to others, I'm a n00b in the I.T. world and I know it but...
C'mon a social science teacher and graphic design teacher (I dont remember the other's two positions, but im sure they were teacher/faculty) interviewing for an I.T. position?
No technical questions, only questions like why would we pick you? Or, what would be a good salary for you? etc etc

What tips/insight would you guys give in this situation?
Thank you.
meh

Comments

  • earweedearweed ■■■■■■■■■□ Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    These people are interviewing you because you may have to interact with them. Treat it as a regular job interview. That interview was more to see what kind of person you are not your technical knowledge.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    kurosaki00 wrote: »
    What do you do when you interview for such serious positions like network tech or system admin and the people that interview you know **** about it?
    Convince them that you won't act like they don't know **** so that they'd want you to be the person hired to help them.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    mikej412 wrote: »
    Convince them that you won't act like they don't know **** so that they'd want you to be the person hired to help them.

    Exactly. They probably don't have IT staff which is why they are the ones interviewing you. Since they don't have technical backgrounds they are probably just looking to see if you can communicate well, and have a good work ethic.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • QHaloQHalo Posts: 1,488Member
    People skills are just as important as technical knowledge. Non-technical interviews are more about your ability to communicate and interact with the group dynamic. To some, that's way more important than knowing how to technically resolve an issue.
  • sambuca69sambuca69 Posts: 262Member
    You usually have a "technical" interview and then a "is this person crazy/social" interview. This looks like the social interview to see your personality.
  • jayc71jayc71 ■■□□□□□□□□ Posts: 92Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    sambuca69 wrote: »
    You usually have a "technical" interview and then a "is this person crazy/social" interview. This looks like the social interview to see your personality.

    Right, this has been the case for most of my interviews in the past. It's when the combine the two and try to be nice to you and ask personality types stuff WHILE asking tough technical questions at the same time that can be rough... icon_lol.gif
    -Justin

    Next up, CCSP.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,170Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    They need someone to look at you without the IT-tinted glasses that your technical interviewers used to see if you fit in. They need to make sure you don't come across as the type that would scare people or put people ill at ease.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCSA 7, learning Ansible
    Future: RHCE? VCAP6.5-DCD?
  • kurosaki00kurosaki00 Posts: 973Member
    I'm always around with a good attitude, not just for interviews.
    But I was kind of surprised that they didnt seem interested in the actual technical stuff for the position.
    Thanks for the advices guys.
    meh
  • earweedearweed ■■■■■■■■■□ Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    I had an interview like this once that at the end the interviewers put me on the phone for the technical interview. After a 45 minute non technical I then had a 30 minute technical interview.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • rhauser44rhauser44 ■□□□□□□□□□ Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    earweed wrote: »
    These people are interviewing you because you may have to interact with them. Treat it as a regular job interview. That interview was more to see what kind of person you are not your technical knowledge.

    I second Earweed. These are the people you will be supporting. They want to see if they will be comfortable with you supporting them. They are gauging your people skills.

    With everything you will do in IT support, there's fixing the technical part, and then there's the part where you are "fixing" the customer. The problem isn't solved until the customer is assured it is. Gradually, fixing and assuring the customer may be where you will need devote the most time.
  • hypnotoadhypnotoad Posts: 915Banned
    Tell them you're an alumni and you already took Hiring 101 so you want to skip their stupid empty questions and get down to some IP.
  • Paul BozPaul Boz ■■■■■■■■□□ Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    In situations like this there are several key points you want to emphasize:

    1.) these are non-technical people for a reason. A critical business skill being tested here is one's ability to convey complex technology statements to non-technical users. This can be done with well-crafted analogies, diagramming at a high level, or using transitional terms that relate to the field the interviewer works in.

    2.) Having the right mentality that IT / security exists to facilitate more efficient and effective business (or in your case learning). It is important to be able to convey the fact that you understand IT is a supporting piece of the organization and that involvement between IT and the business units or departments is critical.

    3.) teamwork with other business units / departments.

    These are "soft skills" that you can't get out of a text book and are usually the first thing you should check for, because if someone just doesn't get it they're not worth investing into the technical interview process.
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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