unix or linux

jasonandashley1jasonandashley1 Member Posts: 15 ■□□□□□□□□□
do you think the tech world looks at a unix certification more than a linucx cert. Im curently using suse 9.3 and solarius 10, just wondering which one im gonna stick with
Brave, brave were the soldiers (high named to-day) who lived through the fight;
But the bravest press'd to the front and fell, unnamed, unknown.
..Walt Whitman..

Comments

  • goasakawagoasakawa Member Posts: 58 ■■□□□□□□□□
    just wondering which one im gonna stick with

    I have a Fedora CD collecting dust. So in reguards to jasonandashley's Questions ...In addition: I am wondering whats a good distro to practice on for a Linux+ cert?
  • Chivalry1Chivalry1 Member Posts: 569
    I always wondered which Linux distro do tech use to practice for the Linux + certification.
    "The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and
    content with your knowledge. " Elbert Hubbard (1856 - 1915)
  • lordylordy Member Posts: 632 ■■■■□□□□□□
    From my experience with LPIC either RedHat/Fedora or Debian are good distros for preparing.

    Regards,
    Lordy
    Working on CCNP: [X] SWITCH --- [ ] ROUTE --- [ ] TSHOOT
    Goal for 2014: RHCA
    Goal for 2015: CCDP
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,473 Admin
    Which UNIX/Linux cert you should get depends upon what you want to do with the cert. If you are looking to learn a particular flavor of UNIX/Linux (e.g., Solaris, Red Hat, etc.), get the cert for that specific OS.

    If you are looking to make yourself more attractive to employers, then you must know what kinds of UNIX/Linux certifications employers are now looking for. To find this, search the job postings on job boards (monster.com, dice.com, etc.). looking for specific certifications. The certs appearing the most frequently in the most current job requisitions are the "hot ones."

    If this is too much work for you, then check out certification info web sites, like www.certmag.com, and read their recent articles on UNIX/Linux certs.

    And remember, having a cert will mean almost nothing if you don't have the experience to back it up.
  • schwarztraderschwarztrader Inactive Imported Users Posts: 21 ■□□□□□□□□□
    My first thought would be to study RedHat if your going to go the Linux route as it seems to be the most prevalent. Now that I have thought about it a little longer I would suggest studying SuSE as it seems to have picked up some steam since Novell got on board with them. If your going to go the Unix side I would suggest Solaris as most customers I've spoken with seemed to have a higher number of Solairs boxes than say AIX (ugh), HPUX, etc.

    I'm still waiting for SuSE 9.3 to become available for FTP install. (how much better is .3 to .2?) I wish I could run Solaris 10 on my measily Ultra1, I guess I may have to eventually break down and get a little beefier Sun box. Or maybe run Solaris 10 x86?.... hmmmm, a thought to ponder.
  • jasonandashley1jasonandashley1 Member Posts: 15 ■□□□□□□□□□
    well i am running suse 9.3 now and I have solarius 10 on my 400mhz pII. Its actually running quite well. if you do dl solarius 10 from sun.com, be sure to dl the 5th cd also, this includes windowmaker,xmms,afterstep and all those nifty programs linux usually comes with. maybe on day I'll by a SPARC just to see what the big deal is. :)
    Brave, brave were the soldiers (high named to-day) who lived through the fight;
    But the bravest press'd to the front and fell, unnamed, unknown.
    ..Walt Whitman..
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,473 Admin
    Most distributions of Linux are available from www.linuxiso.org.
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