Creating a virtual network in VMWare?

wweboywweboy Posts: 287Member
Hi everyone,

I use VMWare workstation to do all my labbing but I feel I'm doing my self a disservice by not replicating a real world environment. Is there away to make a virtual network so I can put different locations on different subnets and still have them talk to each other?

I've read about VMware infrastructure but I can't afford it and I can't do ESX anything because I only have one desktop computer. I want a setup like this

Chicago location = 10.0.1.x
New York Location = 10.0.2.x
Minneapolis Location = 10.0.3.x

Then add a domain controller at each location and what not and get replication working and the ability to emulate that environment to get a real world understanding of what is required to perform the tasks while labbing. I have a sneaking suspicion that the anwser will be I need to purchase VMWares higher end products or invest in other computers or something but I thought it wouldn't hurt to help.

Current setup is Vmware Workstation 7 then all the workstations connect to VMWarenet 6 to a Virtual PFSense firewall.

Thanks for any help.

Comments

  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,806Mod Mod
    The feature you want is under Edit > Virtual Network Editor

    Here's a link that may help: VMware KB: Using the Virtual Network Editor in VMware Workstation
  • Fugazi1000Fugazi1000 Posts: 145Member
    Don't forget you will need something to route between those subnets. Various options exist, but the simplest might be another VM running Windows with IP forwarding enabled and a vNic in each subnet.
  • RTmarcRTmarc Posts: 1,082Member
    There are also several free routers available through the VMware Appliance marketplace.
  • MentholMooseMentholMoose Senior Member Posts: 1,550Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Fugazi1000 wrote: »
    Don't forget you will need something to route between those subnets. Various options exist, but the simplest might be another VM running Windows with IP forwarding enabled and a vNic in each subnet.
    This is what I did when going through the MCITP: EA track, except I used a VM with a base install of Fedora Linux as the router. I was using VMware Workstation 6.5 and had three internal networks (for three AD Sites), and a fourth bridged network. The Linux VM was on all four networks; it served as the default gateway for the internal networks and routed between them, and also did NAT to the outside. It just took a few iptables rules to setup and worked fine with 128MB of RAM.

    I was also interested in labbing more advanced DHCP server configuration, so I setup a DHCP relay on the Fedora VM, and configured the DHCP server on one Windows VM to do DHCP for all the internal networks.
    MentholMoose
    LFCE - MCITP: EDA7, VA, SA, EA - MCSA:S 2003 - CCA (PVS 5, XD 3 / 4 / 5, XS 5 / 6) - VCP 4 / 5
  • wweboywweboy Posts: 287Member
    Do you guys mind if you can explain more? the setup and what distro did you use? I'm stil very confused at how to go about this. I get some of it but its just not clicking for me.

    Thanks so much!
  • Fugazi1000Fugazi1000 Posts: 145Member
    There are many ways to get routing working - as suggested Linux would work well. Vyatta is another option - a virtual appliance router.

    But if you are playing with Windows and DCs and I assume looking towards MSCE/MCITP then I would go with a Windows Server in a workgroup to use as your router.


    A small footprint VM (256MB Ram) with 3 (or more) NICs - 1 in each virtual subnet you have created. Regedit to enable IP forwarding (IPRouterEnable=1). Add DCs to each subnet with the 'router' IP address as the default gateway. Ping to check connectivity.

    Here is a link that might help: How To Enable TCP/IP Forwarding in Windows Server 2003
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,170Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Fugazi1000 wrote: »
    There are many ways to get routing working - as suggested Linux would work well. Vyatta is another option - a virtual appliance router.

    But if you are playing with Windows and DCs and I assume looking towards MSCE/MCITP then I would go with a Windows Server in a workgroup to use as your router.


    A small footprint VM (256MB Ram) with 3 (or more) NICs - 1 in each virtual subnet you have created. Regedit to enable IP forwarding (IPRouterEnable=1). Add DCs to each subnet with the 'router' IP address as the default gateway. Ping to check connectivity.

    Here is a link that might help: How To Enable TCP/IP Forwarding in Windows Server 2003

    I agree with this... if you "just needed a network" than one of the free virtual appliances is the easiest way to go, to the point of being menu/wizard driven and taking only a couple minutes to set up for some of them. However, doing a Windows router would certainly be in scope for you since this seems like the learning track that you're on.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCSA 7, learning Ansible
    Future: RHCE? VCAP6.5-DCD?
  • miamikkmiamikk Posts: 1Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    For the same scenario (10.0.1.x, 10.0.2.x, 10.0.3.x) subnets:

    What should be the VMWare network type for subnets ? (Bridged, NAT or Host-only).?

    Should any of the subnet network type have "Connect a host virtual adapter to this network" checked in VMware Virtual Network Editor ?

    Also, what would be the gateway (will the same gateway work for all subnets or each subnets should have its own gateway) ?

    Ive setup a WinXP system with IP forwarding enabled and with 3 NICs (10.0.1.x, 10.0.2.x, 10.0.3.x ip addresses). I did not create the whole setup yet except for WinXP system.
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