Am I crazy for turning down free CCIE training?

techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
I currently have my ccna. At my current employer I installed a cisco isr router, catalyst switch, and asa firewall. After I installed and configured everything I just babysit the network and create vpns or add new firewall policies from time to time. My actual job responsibility is conducting performance tests or creating bundles on network equipment such as cisco, nexus, and juniper to make sure everything works. I do a lot of proof of concept stuff and configure test networks to test the cards and ports.

My boss approached me today and asked what it would entail to get a CCIE since having a CCIE on staff will provide discounts on equipment. He would provide with everything I need like equipment, videos, bootcamps etc. I told him I feel it would be a waste for me to learn all of that and not use it. Am I crazy for turning it down?
«1

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Yes you are! Why pass up free training? Unless you don't plan on working in the networking field I don't see any reason to pass this up.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Really?! I figured id just be a paper cert since im not working on extrnsive networks,just the one ibuilt at work. I would like to to go into a jr net engineer position im secretly going for my ccnp.
  • QHaloQHalo Member Posts: 1,488
    Considering you have to actually be able to perform the tasks to obtain the cert, I wouldn't consider it a paper cert.
  • Dieg0MDieg0M Member Posts: 861
    "CCIE a paper cert"
    Good one. Get the training as-long as they know it will take a lot of time and don't make guarantees that you will pass it.
    Follow my CCDE journey at www.routingnull0.com
  • techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    My whole thing is that i won't be using it. I guess he wants to be a gold partner but we just deal with equipment we dont provide support or deploy.. We test and resell. I know the hardware real well.
  • tjh87tjh87 Member Posts: 66 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Whether you end up with the cert or not, the free training can't hurt. While you may not use the knowledge on a day to day basis, your foundation will be strengthened. It could also open up future opportunities.
    2013 Goals: /COLOR][COLOR=#ff0000]x[/COLOR][COLOR=#0000cd CCNP, [ ] CCDA, [ ] VCA-DCV
    2014 Goals: [ ] CCDP, [ ] CCNA Security
    , [ ] CCNP Security
    2015 Goals: [ ] Finish BS in CIS,
    [ ] CCIE R&S Written
    2016 Goals:
    [ ] CCIE R&S
  • YFZbluYFZblu Member Posts: 1,462 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Honestly it doesn't sound like you want the training at all. The benefits of CCIE training are very straight forward, I'm sure you're aware of what they are - So why does it matter what people here think?
  • techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I would like too take the opportunity but i would like to put my knowledge to use. I just don't want to be douche bag that takes the training n decide to leave since i lknow advanced topics. The reason for this post is to gauge everyones opinion since i feel crazy for turning it down. But i feel its silly t o dedicate a year studyi on someones elses dime and not use a lick of it. I see it like my employer is paying for me to go school to become a dr. But all i do at work is check someones blood pressure.
  • ptilsenptilsen Member Posts: 2,835 ■■■■■■■■■■
    If there are certs that can't be all paper, it's the CCIE line.

    I really don't think I want to go that direction with my career at any point, but were I offered free training, it would be pretty hard to turn down. The equipment needed alone is pretty valuable.
    Working B.S., Computer Science
    Complete: 55/120 credits SPAN 201, LIT 100, ETHS 200, AP Lang, MATH 120, WRIT 231, ICS 140, MATH 215, ECON 202, ECON 201, ICS 141, MATH 210, LING 111, ICS 240
    In progress: CLEP US GOV,
    Next up: MATH 211, ECON 352, ICS 340
  • jamesp1983jamesp1983 Member Posts: 2,475 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yes, you are. I would attend the training even if I didn't have any desire to become a CCIE just for the knowledge you would obtain. I can't see a way that you could become a CCIE without the lab time and extensive understanding of networking in general when completed in the correct manner (no ****). You will pick up a lot of useful information along the way and it will make you a better network engineer. You won't understand this fully until you actually see your study time paying off in your career.
    "Check both the destination and return path when a route fails." "Switches create a network. Routers connect networks."
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    Oh my word. Having just spent £1800 on equipment, will have £1000 exam fees, approximately £500 in travelling (wife will be coming with me) without thinking about food/drink costs..

    Yes, you are nuts.
  • jamesp1983jamesp1983 Member Posts: 2,475 ■■■■□□□□□□
    QHalo wrote: »
    Considering you have to actually be able to perform the tasks to obtain the cert, I wouldn't consider it a paper cert.

    Well said.
    "Check both the destination and return path when a route fails." "Switches create a network. Routers connect networks."
  • nelnel Member Posts: 2,859 ■□□□□□□□□□
    i would def take the training! infact, i would tell them t fling in study time on works dollar and its a done deal lol!
    Xbox Live: Bring It On

    Bsc (hons) Network Computing - 1st Class
    WIP: Msc advanced networking
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Member Posts: 1,104
    techiie wrote: »
    Really?! I figured id just be a paper cert since im not working on extrnsive networks,just the one ibuilt at work. I would like to to go into a jr net engineer position im secretly going for my ccnp.

    lol...no such thing as a "paper" CCIE. Only the "CCIE Written" lovers fall into the paper category, you can't **** the IE labs.

    It makes no sense to take CCIE courses if you are at the NA level, I would ask him to support you in some CCNP R/S studies.
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    lol I completely used the wrong term I meant a lab CCIE not paper CCIE. A big oops on my part as I see many of you guys who are actually going for your CCIE's took it to offense my apologizes.. Everyone seems to have the same general consensus to take the training as it will better my networking ability. I completely agree but I was always under the impressions that employers and interviewing engineers frown upon someone with a high level cert that lacks the supporting experience. My question is how would I sell it to a prospective employer.
  • BGravesBGraves Member Posts: 339
    In response to your last comment techiie, consider how your current employer thinks of having a CCIE on staff. He certainly seems to perceive benefit from it, whether you are a PR0 or a lab CCIE. Wouldn't you then assume that some employers out there would generally also look at the title favorably, even if you still have some learning/experience to gain? I say go for the training and get as much hands on/experience as you can. Obviously the CCIE is a difficult written/hands on exam, so if you can pass it...what makes you think you don't deserve the title?
  • f0rgiv3nf0rgiv3n Connection Overlord Member Posts: 598 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yes, you are crazy.
  • QHaloQHalo Member Posts: 1,488
    techiie wrote: »
    lol I completely used the wrong term I meant a lab CCIE not paper CCIE. A big oops on my part as I see many of you guys who are actually going for your CCIE's took it to offense my apologizes.. Everyone seems to have the same general consensus to take the training as it will better my networking ability. I completely agree but I was always under the impressions that employers and interviewing engineers frown upon someone with a high level cert that lacks the supporting experience. My question is how would I sell it to a prospective employer.

    If you did the CCIE on your own, you weren't already working in some networking job capacity and then went looking for a high level job, then yeah it might be frowned upon and you may not get very far. But from what you state, you're not. However your employer is willing to front you to get it. You just need to make sure that he's going to use you for more than just your number to get a discount. If he does, then you'll get experience to help back it up. It's a win/win. I would just make sure they understand that you want to do more if you pass that helps back it up.
  • techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I assure you all he wants is the number. My new found knowledge wouldn't be used by him one bit or at least thats how it seems.
  • BGravesBGraves Member Posts: 339
    If it's completely free (no strings attached and no kidneys given as payment) then I would take the training with hopes that it improves your skills and understanding. Nothing wrong with investing in yourself, especially if someone else will pay for it. If he wants a few years of your life in exchange, maybe that's not the best choice.
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Member Posts: 1,104
    techiie wrote: »
    lol I completely used the wrong term I meant a lab CCIE not paper CCIE. A big oops on my part as I see many of you guys who are actually going for your CCIE's took it to offense my apologizes.. Everyone seems to have the same general consensus to take the training as it will better my networking ability. I completely agree but I was always under the impressions that employers and interviewing engineers frown upon someone with a high level cert that lacks the supporting experience. My question is how would I sell it to a prospective employer.


    You would never even come close to achieving a CCIE without a lot of experience under your belt so don't worry about it. I would still push for CCNP training because what sense does it make taking a course whose curriculum will be based on the idea that you be familiar with CCNP level topics?
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • QHaloQHalo Member Posts: 1,488
    Is he making you sign something saying if he fronts you, how long you have to stay with him to 'pay it back'? That's another key. Typically when employers do this, there's a period of time you have to stick around.
  • QHaloQHalo Member Posts: 1,488
    You would never even come close to achieving a CCIE without a lot of experience under your belt so don't worry about it.

    Given the amount of training material and vendors out there, I don't agree with this at all. Any exam you can study for, is passable by studying. Experiential information just makes it easier. Rare? Sure. Impossible? Not really.
  • techiietechiie Member Posts: 91 ■■□□□□□□□□
    @RouteMyPacket --regarding the CCNP level topics I've actually started my CCNP studies. I started studying for switch a few weeks back. My plan is to have the CCNP done by june/july 14 then off to looking for work. He originally did tell me he would pay for my certifications but with this guy if he does a favor for you expect him to ask for triple and he is the type of person that would throw things in your face. Thats why I chose to not include him in my CCNP studies and pay for the certs out of pocket.

    @QHalo - no I do not believe he will make me sign anything but I don't want to do things on his dime and just pick up and leave the day I do get my number. That would be a bridge forever burned..
  • QHaloQHalo Member Posts: 1,488
    I'm not saying do it and then bounce, but after a year I'd probably start thinking about getting out and on. That's what I'd give him. Mutually beneficial.
  • deth1kdeth1k Member Posts: 312
    lol...no such thing as a "paper" CCIE. Only the "CCIE Written" lovers fall into the paper category, you can't **** the IE labs.

    It makes no sense to take CCIE courses if you are at the NA level, I would ask him to support you in some CCNP R/S studies.

    So wrong about the cheating bit...
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Member Posts: 1,104
    QHalo wrote: »
    Given the amount of training material and vendors out there, I don't agree with this at all. Any exam you can study for, is passable by studying. Experiential information just makes it easier. Rare? Sure. Impossible? Not really.

    Yeah? Well good luck on your IE lab
    deth1k wrote: »
    So wrong about the cheating bit...

    Really? So I take it you know this from experience?
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • QHaloQHalo Member Posts: 1,488
    Why so rude? Can't you just agree to disagree instead of being condescending?
  • Roy4USARoy4USA Member Posts: 22 ■□□□□□□□□□
    techiie wrote: »
    I currently have my ccna. At my current employer I installed a cisco isr router, catalyst switch, and asa firewall. After I installed and configured everything I just babysit the network and create vpns or add new firewall policies from time to time. My actual job responsibility is conducting performance tests or creating bundles on network equipment such as cisco, nexus, and juniper to make sure everything works. I do a lot of proof of concept stuff and configure test networks to test the cards and ports.

    My boss approached me today and asked what it would entail to get a CCIE since having a CCIE on staff will provide discounts on equipment. He would provide with everything I need like equipment, videos, bootcamps etc. I told him I feel it would be a waste for me to learn all of that and not use it. Am I crazy for turning it down?

    Yes. If you are not passionate about continuously learning, you should find a new line of work.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I think if the boss ask for it you should give it some serious consideration regardless of what it is unless it harms you or hurts your career. However it sounds like he wants you to obtain the CCIE certification not just the knowledge. That is a major time consideration and unless he is going to allow you time to study at work I wouldn't do it. If you have other activities that will suffer outside of work I would be very cautious. If you are a person where work is everything then okay but for someone who has diversity in life unless YOU want to do it I wouldn't.
Sign In or Register to comment.