SSCP or Associate ISC2(cissp)

magic19magic19 Posts: 13Member ■□□□□□□□□□
What it be better to get SSCP certified if I have the experience to do so or to get my associate CISSP and just work up to getting certified?

Comments

  • keatronkeatron Posts: 1,208Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    Tell me a little about your current situation and your future plans. Which is best for you depends on several factors.
  • magic19magic19 Posts: 13Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    At the moment I'm a network administrator. I'm in charge of the full backup and security for one of my sites. I was also a Cryptologic technician in the Navy for 4 years and I do have my military records to prove it. I don't know how much of the actual job requirements this will give me. But I've been at my current position for a year.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,473Admin Admin
    The SSCP is more oriented towards the technical InfoSec professions and technicians. I'm studying for the SSCP right now, and most of the domains are quite technically interesting. The CISSP requires much more understanding of administrative/managerial topics, such as security policies, incidence response, business continuity plans, and legal issues and ethics.

    If you have four years of verifiable crypto experience in the Navy, you don't need to stop at only CISSP Associate. However, with your current knowledge and experience, you might be able to achieve the SSCP sooner.
  • keatronkeatron Posts: 1,208Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    And I can tell you pretty much for sure, your Navy experience with cryptography will qualify you for the CISSP credential. The SSCP as pointed out by JD tends to be more interesting and definitely more of a "hands on, this is how it works" type of knowledge base. Are you doing this to get a better position somewhere or just for knowledge enhancement or both?

    Keatron.
  • magic19magic19 Posts: 13Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'm doing this for both getting a better position and knowledge enhancement. I'm aware of the serious salary advancement of the CISSP but I also love the hands on portion of my IT career.
  • magic19magic19 Posts: 13Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'm doing this for both getting a better position and knowledge enhancement. I'm aware of the serious salary advancement of the CISSP but I also love the hands on portion of my IT career.
  • keatronkeatron Posts: 1,208Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    magic19 wrote:
    I'm doing this for both getting a better position and knowledge enhancement. I'm aware of the serious salary advancement of the CISSP but I also love the hands on portion of my IT career.

    The salary increase that comes with the CISSP is heavily dependent upon the relevant experience you have to go along with it. For example, if you're a desktop support technician who happens to have a CISSP, don't expect to get 100k per year just because you have a CISSP. While it is a fact that you having the knowledge that comes from preparing for the CISSP is an obvious advantage to your company, your perception of it's value will usually be more than what the company or the "people in charge" might perceive it to be. If you work for a infosec consulting company or something along those lines, this dynamic improves dramatically to your advantage. So at this point, I would advise hitting which ever one interests you the most.
  • magic19magic19 Posts: 13Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks, you guys were a great help. I think I'm going to go with the CISSP route. I figure if I have enough experience from my military career I might as well go for the cert and then get a job as an infrastructure and security engineer like I've been trying for the past year and a half. I'll have my Network+ and CCNA by the end of July, then I'll be pushing for CCNP. After that I'm going for the security certs. I''m establishing my study plan and goals now that way I don't go off track or lose site.

    Also I was looking at my military records and found my orders, crypto school info, awards and other things proving my cryptologic career in the Navy.
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