Landed a great new job... but terrible experience putting in my notice...

pamccabepamccabe Member Posts: 315 ■■■□□□□□□□
I was hoping I'd feel better about landing my first 'real' IT job. Today, I was offered, and accepted, my first position as a System Administrator/Engineer for a small company. I am VERY excited to work with VMWare, Citrix, Cisco, HP, Juniper equipment... the list goes on. I will be part of a team that is very welcoming and excited to have me on board. I am still a student, hoping to graduate next year, and they are happy to work around my schedule also. This is a welcome change from the large company I am currently at where I have to put in a request to a server team in order to have my password changed only to have it done two weeks later. I think I'll enjoy the small company feel because I'll get to work with many different platforms and implement changes as the team sees fit. No jumping through hoops.

That was the good... then there was the ugly. My current manager is just a beast. She is known to have mood swings that can only be characterized as unmedicated bi-polar. I called and talked to her as soon as I accepted the position. I told her the night shift was putting a strain on my family, I wasn't seeing my 10 month old son as much as I wanted, and my grades were hurting because I just couldn't put in the necessary time on studies. I just flat out was not adjusting to 3rd shift as I had hoped. I told her I was thankful for the opportunity to work for her and I learned a lot. I said I would stay on board for longer than 2 weeks if it would help to find a replacement. She let loose on me about how she always had to cover for me, adjust the schedule to suit my needs, and how I am nothing but a big let down. Mind you, I am an excellent team-mate, I helped train our entire staff even though I was one of the newest employees there and had nothing but glowing reviews. She ended up yelling at me and hanging up on me. I've never encountered anything like this before. I don't know what to think. Before she hung up, she said she wants my notice in writing on her desk by the morning.

Anyone ever have to deal with anything like this?? I was so happy about my new position, but am now nervous about what type of work environment I will have to deal with until my last day.

Comments

  • LarryDaManLarryDaMan Member Posts: 797
    Perhaps tell your new boss that you're available immediately and then leave the old gig now. No explanation is needed, but if asked, tell her that you did not appreciate her attitude and unprofessional behavior during that telephone call. Maybe (or maybe not), she'll learn a lesson and be better towards the next person. If you say nothing, she'll definitely continue the behavior.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Yeah I have and it's more normal than you might think. I've had a boss in the same conversation go from yelling at me to crying and asking me to go out for drinks. Sounds like she is hurt and doesn't know how to control her emotions. Good luck
  • ratbuddyratbuddy Member Posts: 665
    Don't let it get to you. Abusive a-holes tend to gravitate towards management positions, all the better to ply their craft. It's her problem, not yours. She wins if you let it piss you off. Give a nice big poo-eating smile every time you see her, and if that makes her lose her cool at work, great.
  • cruwlcruwl Member Posts: 341 ■■□□□□□□□□
    LarryDaMan wrote: »
    Perhaps tell your new boss that you're available immediately and then leave the old gig now. No explanation is needed, but if asked, tell her that you did not appreciate her attitude and unprofessional behavior during that telephone call. Maybe (or maybe not), she'll learn a lesson and be better towards the next person. If you say nothing, she'll definitely continue the behavior.

    This sounds like a good idea to me. You may want to prepare your self to be walked about tomorrow. I have had several friends who had bosses like this and as soon as they put in noticed they were walked out let go early.
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Member Posts: 1,104
    LarryDaMan wrote: »
    Perhaps tell your new boss that you're available immediately and then leave the old gig now. No explanation is needed, but if asked, tell her that you did not appreciate her attitude and unprofessional behavior during that telephone call. Maybe (or maybe not), she'll learn a lesson and be better towards the next person. If you say nothing, she'll definitely continue the behavior.


    ^ This!
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • The TechnomancerThe Technomancer Member Posts: 96 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Companies don't give you notice when going out of business, laying you off, or firing you. Why give them that courtesy? It never turns out well.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
  • pamccabepamccabe Member Posts: 315 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the reassurance and guidance everyone. This is one of the many reasons I love this community. I have a tendency to allow myself be walked on but I think I will stand my ground on this one. I'm going to speak with HR and start the new job as soon as possible.
  • iBrokeITiBrokeIT GRID, GICSP, GCIP, GXPN, GPEN, GWAPT, GCFE, GCIA, GCIH, GSEC, CySA+, Sec+, eJPT Member Posts: 1,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    A two weeks notice a professional courtesy. If she is not going to show the same level of professionalism towards you then I would not bother showing up tomorrow.
    2019: GPEN | GCFE | GXPN | GICSP | CySA+ 
    2020: GCIP | GCIA 
    2021: GRID | GDSA

    WGU BS IT-NA | SANS Grad Cert: PT&EH | SANS Grad Cert: ICS Security | SANS Grad Cert: Cyber Defense Ops
  • AkaricloudAkaricloud Member Posts: 938
    Companies don't give you notice when going out of business, laying you off, or firing you. Why give them that courtesy? It never turns out well.

    It's the professional, nice thing to do that helps maintain connections. Most of the time it works out very well and allows for life-long references.

    In the case that they are neither professional or nice about it then courtesy goes out the window in my opinion.
  • Santa_Santa_ Member Posts: 131 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm in the same boat as you pam. I'm trying to leave my current position now as the constant unprofessional behavior from my boss is getting to me. I can't handle the stress put on me by someone who just yells or speaks over anyone. It's been 7 months and I feel like I need to get out, plus its turned into a position that I lost interest with - system administration. I wish I accepted a network position earlier to jump start my career in networking.

    Best of luck to you pam and your future endeavors!
  • TheProfTheProf Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 331 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I personally don't know your situation but if you did everything right and were a good employee, you have nothing to feel bad for. I can understand the manager might be on the spot because it makes her look bad when people leave, but raising her voice at you is not good business conduct. I also know what it feels like to have someone raise their voice at you like that, I've been in a similar situation, but the best advice I can give you, is do everything by the books, submit your resignation letter and thank her and your colleagues regardless of the outcome. In the end, everyone is human, whether its your boss or the owner of the company, people make mistakes, take things personally, or even take it out on you when it has nothing to do with you.

    Keep your head up high and look forward to a new opportunity.
  • --chris----chris-- Member Posts: 1,518 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I just went through the same thing (quit for different reason though). My boss was unhappy, unprofessional and tried to guilt me into staying on board.

    It happens, don't feel bad! And congrats, I remember you posting before saying that you were having a hard time with the shift because of the family.
  • down77down77 Member Posts: 1,009
    I had a situation similar to yours a few years ago when I resigned from my previous position. My boss was less than professional and in the end I ended up being walked out the same day.

    Keep your head held high, contact your new employer and offer to start earlier if they are willing to allow it. Like others said, giving a 2 week notice is a courtesy more than a requirement unless you have a contractual obligation.

    Congrats on the new position!
    CCIE Sec: Starting Nov 11
  • J_86J_86 Member Posts: 262 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Sounds like you have done nothing wrong, I wouldn't waste the time or energy worrying about it. I worked for a company before where it was the policy to walk people out as soon as they turned in their notice. You've done your part, if they cannot be professional about it time to move on sooner then you thought you were going to!
  • PsychoFinPsychoFin Member Posts: 280
    Wow and over here we cringe about the 3 month notice that is mandatory by law... Good luck with your new job, I'm sure you will do great. It's always a gamble to start a new job as you don't know what to expect when it comes to the environment and people.
  • jvrlopezjvrlopez Member Posts: 912 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Who cares what they think? You're leaving anyways and they've shown their true colors so don't worry about burning any bridges. Heck, after her outburst, I'd say its time to skate.

    FIGMO
    And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high. ~Ayrton Senna
  • thenjdukethenjduke Member Posts: 894 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I would write your letter in such a nice way and at the end of it put a huge SMILEY FACE on it and say I have enjoyed working for you and it was a pleasure to meet you.
    CCNA, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCDST, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, Working towards Networking BS. CCNP is Next.
  • colemiccolemic Member Posts: 1,568 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Well if you really wanted to cause a stink... given that you have described an obscenely bureaucratic organization, you could file an HR complaint against her. (And more importantly, you would be ethically justified in doing so.) OTOH it may just be better to put your notice on her desk, effective immediately. I wouldn't want to stay the next two weeks in such a toxic environment.
    Working on: CCSP, definitely, maybe. On the twitters: @mcole1008
  • The_ExpertThe_Expert Member Posts: 136
    Don't let this get to you... you did the right thing. You were very professional with how you notified your manager. Now, she has to deal with it.

    I worked for a company for 16 years. Put in my 2 week notice and they immediately isolated and broke off all contact with me. It was the worst 2 weeks of my life. I got nothing done during that time - except cleaned out my office.

    If they owe you vacation time, you should be able to use it. If not, like others said - I would probably not go back, just because how you were treated. It's their loss!

    Now, move on and enjoy your new career!
    Masters, Public Administration (MPA), Bachelor of Science, 20+ years of technical experience.

    Studying on again, off again...
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,309 ■■■■■■■■□□
    It sucks to have to play the game, but I'd just go back with a smile on my face, you can tolerate anything for 2 weeks. Remember, it is your first job, people might call it for references at a point later. Although, if you have a person above your manager that you got along well with you might consider asking to use them as a reference later instead of your past manager.

    I had an interview the other day and they were asking detailed questions on why I left a job 12 years ago, so I figure they can technically check back as far as they want.
  • Legacy UserLegacy User Unregistered / Not Logged In Posts: 0 ■□□□□□□□□□
    LarryDaMan wrote: »
    Perhaps tell your new boss that you're available immediately and then leave the old gig now. No explanation is needed, but if asked, tell her that you did not appreciate her attitude and unprofessional behavior during that telephone call. Maybe (or maybe not), she'll learn a lesson and be better towards the next person. If you say nothing, she'll definitely continue the behavior.

    I agree with this ^ With a manager that sensitive she might try to make your last 2 weeks a nightmare.

    On a side note @LarryDaMan and @RouteMyPacket both of your avatars crack me up every time I see it.
  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    When I left the MSP I was with the head of sales did the same thing. He sent a very long email (including the Director of Ops and the owner of the company) saying how they bent over backwards for me, that my threats to leave had to stop, who did I think I was, and then ended with "now what do we need to do to get you to stay?" Mind you I gave them a month notice and stayed on to train my replacement. Most of the time management lives in a dream world and honestly I don't fault them for wigging out a bit. I let it roll off my shoulder and continue on my path because now more then ever you need to worry about number one. Take it in stride, do your two weeks, and go to the new job with an open mind.
    WIP:
    PHP
    Kotlin
    Intro to Discrete Math
    Programming Languages
    Work stuff
  • abramsgunnerabramsgunner Member Posts: 31 ■■■□□□□□□□
    The question has been answered.. but I'll throw in my thoughts as well..

    As others have said, two weeks is a professional courtesy, and I would suggest being as professional as possible..... you never know who will influence your future. You will be surprised when you find out who's father/wife/'cousin's best friend' has a direct influence on your future professional life. It IS a small world. I'm not a customer/supervisor is 'Always right' kind of person, but its never a good idea to burn a bridge.

    I would make an attempt to finish my two weeks... but you already have your next job, so if it turns for the worst, be polite and exit without drama... a simple notice that your schedule has unexpectedly moved forward and a smile is all it should take.

    It's true, if they wanted you gone, you'd get enough notice to put your junk in a box, so don't feel guilty if you must leave early, just be 'Adult' about it.

    Congrats on the new digs.... one day you'll find the perfect spot... and eventually you'll out-grow it and be on the lookout for the next!
Sign In or Register to comment.