Job Offer

RTmarcRTmarc Member Posts: 1,082 ■■■□□□□□□□
I've been looking for a job for several months in my native city for some time now and finally got an offer of employment today. I'm having a hard time convincing myself that I made the right decision to accept the offer. The job market in the area has been extremely slow this year; much more so than last year. As I stated previously, I've been trying to move back home for several months now and until today I've been unsuccessful.

What is the cause for my concern?
The Bad:
The job pays right at $10000/yr less than the bottom end of my desired range.

The Neutral:
My new boss says he is big on raises and promotions. Even though I'm not within my desired range at this point, it's likely I could be there within the next few years.

The Good:
My new boss says he is more than happy to send (and pay for up front - not reimbursement) me to any type of training I desire so long as I present initiative. As I'm sure you all know this can be almost invaluable. It's very likely that I could have $20000 granted to me for training! Training opportunities like this don't come every day and I hate to miss this one. Health benefits are completely paid for by the company. They do the whole profit sharing, 401K, etc. that you would expect from a smaller company.

I can't decide if I made the right decision or not. On one hand, I would really like the extra cash included in my salary. On the other, it's nice to not have to worry about saving money for a training course or seminar. The new boss states the he is big on raises and promotions. I don't know this so I'll have to take his word on it. The decision I made was to go ahead and take the job but while I'm in the probation period, so are they. I decided that I would join up but if the manager was feeding me a load of crap about the training and raises and so forth I'm out; and quickly at that!

Did I make the right decision or should I have kept looking for another position that would have paid closer to my desired range?

Comments

  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Did I make the right decision or should I have kept looking for another position that would have paid closer to my desired range?
    You can still keep your eyes open, but based on the info you've provided, imo you made 'a' good decision. Sure pay is important, but there's more than money to a job. Especially once you've been in the industry for some years, things like working close to home (more time with family/friends) tend to become more valuable. 'Free' training is nice, but it becomes even more valuable if you also can apply the knowledge as part of your job. That would allow you to expand your list of certs, and at the same time have the experience to back them up, and vice versa. Your new boss seems to have some desirable characteristics more managers should have. Sometimes you have to take a chance and you may not know until years after whether it's been 'the right' decision, maybe never at all. You already accepted the offer, so make the best of it and keep moving forward. Regrets are futile.
  • sharptechsharptech Member Posts: 492
    I say you made the right decision as well!

    Free training is excellent because experience is very important. This will help you land those bigger paying jobs later on.

    He also said he is big on raises- work very hard and show a lot of interest and dedication to the job and im sure you will be right where you want to be soon enough.

    If this is a job you find out you do not like- well you have the experience and training to move forward.

    Good luck!
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    You did the right thing. It's hard to put a monetary value on free training because it can make you more valuable for years to come. And you're back home. Unless you really NEED the additional $10,000 right now, you'll be fine.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Do they have a written education/training policy? Look through the booklet from HR and see. If it is not in writing, you could be disappointed. My company has a written education reimbursement policy, right down to the dollar amount allowed, the kind of training allowed, and the authorization needed to approve the training/education.
    Without something official in writing, he could potentially use any sort of excuse he wanted to keep the "carrot on a stick" ahead of you, making you uncertain as to whether or not you will ever get the training.

    "We can't spare you for the week that the training is available, let's check again when the next class starts".
    "Well, that training doesn't really apply to your job here".
    "That's a lot of money for that kind of training".
    "I wanted to approve it for you, but my boss shot it down. Don't worry, we'll get the next one approved".

    Suddnely, a year has gone by and you received no training compensation. I hope I am wrong - but before your probation period is over, try to get some training in and see what the response is like.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • RTmarcRTmarc Member Posts: 1,082 ■■■□□□□□□□
    sprkymrk wrote:
    Do they have a written education/training policy? Look through the booklet from HR and see. If it is not in writing, you could be disappointed. My company has a written education reimbursement policy, right down to the dollar amount allowed, the kind of training allowed, and the authorization needed to approve the training/education.
    Without something official in writing, he could potentially use any sort of excuse he wanted to keep the "carrot on a stick" ahead of you, making you uncertain as to whether or not you will ever get the training.

    "We can't spare you for the week that the training is available, let's check again when the next class starts".
    "Well, that training doesn't really apply to your job here".
    "That's a lot of money for that kind of training".
    "I wanted to approve it for you, but my boss shot it down. Don't worry, we'll get the next one approved".

    Suddnely, a year has gone by and you received no training compensation. I hope I am wrong - but before your probation period is over, try to get some training in and see what the response is like.
    This is what I'm worried about and hence my suspicion. My supervisor is the CIO and claims that because he is senior staff he can get pretty much whatever he wants within reason. I've pretty much decided that I made the right decision. As I stated previously, I'm going to give them a shot to prove themselves and after a few months make the decision to stay or go.

    Thanks for the feedback everyone!
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,439 Admin
    Realize that the phrase "the boss says..." means absolutely nothing unless what is said is also backed up in writing in a form that can be used in arbitration or in a court of law. Unless you know from personal experience the word of a specific individual can be trusted, never count on what "the boss says" as a certain reality.
  • keenonkeenon Member Posts: 1,922 ■■■■□□□□□□
    jdmurray wrote:
    Realize that the phrase "the boss says..." means absolutely nothing unless what is said is also backed up in writing in a form that can be used in arbitration or in a court of law. Unless you know from personal experience the word of a specific individual can be trusted, never count on what "the boss says" as a certain reality.

    ain't that the truth icon_exclaim.gif

    been there and got the shirt.. give them a shot but next time get it in writing always in writing
    Become the stainless steel sharp knife in a drawer full of rusty spoons
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    RTmarc wrote:
    The decision I made was to go ahead and take the job but while I'm in the probation period, so are they.

    Well said. Ride this job out until you find something that pays more.
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Did you get a good explanation of what free training was included? I had a job that offered free training which included access to an assortment of mostly outdated books and videos.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • RTmarcRTmarc Member Posts: 1,082 ■■■□□□□□□□
    ajs1976 wrote:
    Did you get a good explanation of what free training was included? I had a job that offered free training which included access to an assortment of mostly outdated books and videos.
    I was told that it would be pretty much anything I wanted. In fact one of the other employees was being sent somewhere in Tennessee (I'm in Birmingham, AL) for training and he was going to send another out to San Francisco for a Veritas seminar or some such. It sounds to me that it's pretty much open-ended as far as training goes.
  • frankj1247frankj1247 Member Posts: 111
    I really like the free training and from your last post it sounds like your boss really does send his employees places for training, that in it's own right can be worth alot more than 10,000 considering the contacts that you can make in these training sessions.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    deleted
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • sweaversweaver Member Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Birmingham? I live in Tuscaloosa...out of curiosity, what company did you start with?
  • ngmtechngmtech Member Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
    You made the right decision but keep looking for other jobs. It's currently an employers market for IT people right now, that's why the pay is dropping and they'll lay you off at a moments notice.

    Take any job you can get but always keep looking for better. If you find a better job, take some personal time and interview! Or if you find you're getting great raises and bonuses and you really love your current job you can stay there, but I think in IT you should always be looking to ratchet yourself up the ladder. The cost of living these days is high and if there's a better opportunity out there go for it! Or you could ask your current employer for a counter offer.

    There's no reason to remain loyal to an employer that doens't pay you what your worth though. Stay professional though and try to give advanced notice if your previous employer was honest.
  • dan87951dan87951 Member Posts: 107
    At least you have a job!?! Don't take things for granted! If its a bigger company that allows you to move up the ranks than I think you made a wise decision. remeber always think long term! Good Luck with it! Im hurting hard for a job and im from Michigan, suprise?! probably not
  • dagger1xdagger1x Member Posts: 55 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I live in the UP, very rural and jobs in IT are damn near non exisitant. As soon as the wife graduates were leaving Michigan
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    dagger1x wrote:
    I live in the UP, very rural and jobs in IT are damn near non exisitant. As soon as the wife graduates were leaving Michigan

    I was just in Calumet for a week back in July. I live in E.Lansing, you should check out Tech and see what postings they have.
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